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Poisonous plants for worming

 
Posts: 71
Location: Tennesse, an hour west of Nashville, zone 7
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hunting chicken
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I know Sepp doesn't worm, but observes the animals eating poisonous plants when they need it. What kind of plants have been found to be the most helpful in this regard?
 
steward
Posts: 7926
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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There are numerous plants that have worming abilities. Some, but not all are regarded as poisonous.

A few plants which are well known for their worming abilities:

* Garlic
* Cayenne
* Wormwood
* Cinnamon
* Quassia
* Slippery Elm
* Thyme
* Peppermint

Quassia, and cinnamon are tropical, but the rest should grow in the US.



 
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Monkshood, Lupine, Digitalis as a free choice from the field.
 
pollinator
Posts: 304
Location: Montana
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This is where native medicinal come into play. Diversity is the key, the animals will find the plants they need. In many cases rather than using the same plant Sepp is observing as successful, we should be finding our own native medicinal plant that fills the same role.

Potent medicinal plants used to be wide spread everywhere in the Americas. There are still pockets of this great diversity and potent medicine but it is drastically reduced from what it used to be. We need to start cultivating this diversity to preserve the integrity of our environment, the ecosystems that support us.

Judith, Johnny, Zach, and Chad - Team Holzer AgroEcology
 
pollinator
Posts: 755
Location: zone 6b
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Black walnut hulls are also good dewormers. As are things high in tannins like acorns. And pumpkin seeds. And copper-accumulating plants like spurge (tho they can overeat them and get copper poisoning so you have to keep an eye out).
 
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This article is about Lespedeza, a forage plant that keeps worm load down in goats. It is, however, a pasture pest plant if allowed to get tall and woody. Some states list it as a noxious weed.

http://www.extension.org/pages/19420/goat-pastures-sericea-lespedeza
 
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