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That is some serious rototilling

 
Erika May
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So a few months back my pig decided she wanted to be free range. She had waited for 3 months for us to put up some fences/paddocks and we never got it finished in time. So she just busted out of her pen. Then busted a hole in the barn (RIP barn.) Since *my* nagging wasn't enough to get the then significant other to finish the outlying fence, she decided to help a sister out in the matter. Amazing how quickly one can build a fence when you have a raging 600 lb pig strolling through the neighborhood!

The problem now is I am trying to divide the area into paddocks and Ms.Rosie has tilled up a significant amount of grass to the point the "pasture" is totally lumpy and ankle twisting....also not easy to lay a fence on. She likes to tear the turf up, then make a huge mound leaving a hill next to 3 foot wide swath of bare ground. Sound pretty typical? Once pigs finish tilling, does one typically leave the lumps assuming they will eventually rot away or some how bother to smooth it out some? She seems to have focused much of her ire on former landscape grass which i was planning on reseeding with pasture grass, turnips, clover, ect. It is a very neglected pasture that is thatched over so theres not even much grass for her to munch on yet. I am hoping to get her to till up the quack grass for me.

I'm mainly concerned that the sheep don't break their ankles later when I reintroduce them to the reseeded pasture. The ram was chasing the new girl and finally stopped when he twisted his ankle in one of the Rosie hills. I've taken a few plunges, too.
 
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