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web worms

 
Leah Sattler
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from my memory these nasty critters will be gone when it gets cold. usually they appear earlier. we seem to be getting a late wave of them. when we drove up north to tulsa it was much worse.....I'm guessing they are working their way south. any good tips? you figure nature will take care of this since it is so late in the season already? I fear that they will come back with a vengeance early next year.
 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
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Location: North Central Michigan
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well i'm not sure if web worms are tent and or army worms or some other type of worm, but here they came in june and july and were a massive outbreak..and worried me too about next year..

i destroyed any i found on my property as some areas were completely defoliated in surrounding neighborhoods and i didn't want that here..

unfortunately the adults fly..and can desposit their egg cases wherever they choose..

the kind we have attack first the fruits such as cherries and apples..but also oaks and maples and others such as the small shrubby trees and bushes
 
Joel Hollingsworth
pollinator
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Location: Oakland, CA
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So then, long term, a short hedge of sour cherries in one or more of the chicken paddocks might be an appropriate control measure?

Edit:

Based on the flyer, I guess a mixed hedge of honeylocust and crabapple, perhaps with some juniper, might be better. 
 
Gwen Lynn
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Helpful info for identification of bag worms, web worms, tent caterpillars. Sorry it mentions pesticides, but still is helpful for identification.
Filename: webtentbagworm.pdf
Description:
File size: 256 Kbytes
[Download webtentbagworm.pdf] Download Attachment
 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
Posts: 4434
Location: North Central Michigan
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judicious use of BT on the proper infestation is how i deal with them if they are bad..generally..this year we actually had to choose stronger measures..but generally bt will take care of them if it is put on early and often ..esp cherry and apple trees..

i would prefer that the birds could handle them..but the infestation we had this year was even overwhelming the birds..thankfully our property was easily taken care of..but the counties in the area were stripped
 
Jeremy Bunag
gardener
Posts: 231
Location: Central IL
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Wow thanks for the document Gwen!  I never knew what those things were on my spruces (bagworms).  I could never adequately describe them to find out what they were.

I hate 'em.  Nowadays (after it decimated one of my young spruces - it's trying to recover this year) I just pick 'em off whenver I see 'em.  Hopefully that's good enough to help.  I feel like I'm attacking them too late though, after reading the pamphlet.
 
Gwen Lynn
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You are welcome! Don't you just love the internet? We have so much access to information (good, bad, useful & useless, I know! :lol it's just amazing!
 
Jeremy Bunag
gardener
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Location: Central IL
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Not to steer this too far away from web worms, but I just read a cool way to control bagworms:  Plant Asters to attract ichneumonid wasps, which lay the parasitic young on the bagworms and don't care about humans.  Perhaps this would work on some of the other bad worms?

http://gardening.about.com/od/gardenproblems/qt/Bagworm.htm

Other controls include Bt, as mentioned by Brenda...
 
Joel Hollingsworth
pollinator
Posts: 2103
Location: Oakland, CA
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I had to look up BT.

Exciting stuff!
 
Leah Sattler
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well at least these look like fall web worms according to the pamphlet and are said to mostly be an aesthetic problem. boy they sure are ugly.
 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
Posts: 4434
Location: North Central Michigan
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well my asters are now just coming into their own..so i can see how a fall blooming plant would attract fall blooming parasites..thanks for the info but i have not noticed fall bag worms here.
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://richsoil.com/cards
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