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Broomsticks and baskets

 
Burra Maluca
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I found this guy at a market a few weeks ago.



According to the advert behind him, he's an esparteiro, which, when I googled it, came up with another picture of him, from this site.



Esparteiros make things out of esparto grass, which according to wikkipedia looks like this...



I'm pretty sure I've seen that stuff growing around the place, and am going to have to investigate it a bit more.

I couldn't resist that broom, so it came home with me.



I'd never really thought about it much before, but I guess there must be loads of ancient crafts utilising natural fibres, so I thought I'd start this thread to encourage everyone to share what they know about which fibres to use, broomstick lore, how to make things.

Any takers?
 
Judith Browning
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Beautiful baskets/coils of fiber? and broom/basket maker!
Here, craftspeople make traditional baskets from locally harvested and prepared oak splits, grape vine, ratan vine, hickory bark, coral berry; chair seats from hickory bark; corn husk and white oak splits; broom handles from sassafras (because it holds its bark) they are often carved with spirit faces, the broom maker down the road from us buys their broom corn because their business got too big to grow enough...but they can grow it here.
Did you mean just plant fibers or any natural materials? animal fiber...spinning and weaving? we are in a county that is known for it's craftsmen and women so I could go on and on.


this is a link to our broom maker neighbors..... Grassy Creek Brooms
 
Ludger Merkens
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Well here is a nice tutorial with pictures: How to Weave a Wicker Basket



A practical guide by Jonathan Ridgeon
 
Peter Ellis
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Peter Follansbee's blog has some nice stuff on making baskets. His "day job" is joiner at the Plimouth plantation, but his blog covers spoon carving and some basket making along with making amazing furniture, all with hand tools and human power.
 
Hans Quistorff
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My fathers childhood native friend stayed with us in 1980 while he was passing on traditional techniques to the Puyallup tribe. He explained how the hallow reeds that grow in swampy areas around Puget sound were woven into cooking baskets. They were woven very tightly to be water tight and hot rocks were added to the water to heat it to cooking temperature.
 
Judith Browning
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Peter Ellis wrote:Peter Follansbee's blog has some nice stuff on making baskets. His "day job" is joiner at the Plimouth plantation, but his blog covers spoon carving and some basket making along with making amazing furniture, all with hand tools and human power.


here is a link Peter Follansbee
....... beautiful work!
 
John Polk
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Traditional brooms here in the U.S. were made from 'Broom Corn', which is actually sorghum stalks.
They lasted for years.
 
Sue Rine
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Here in New Zealand the traditional weaving is done mostly using Harakeke which is also, incorrectly, known as flax. It is not related to the linen flax but does contain a fibre which can be used in similar ways. Mostly though, it is split into strips and used to weave baskets, bags, (kete), flowers, (putiputi) etc. I love weaving although my hands have given out somewhat but I really love making and using items which, when they are worn out, simply compost. Nothing destroyed, simply borrowed for a time. There are protocols around the gathering and weaving of harakeke which ensure the resource is not overused and depleted. Skilled weavers are true artists and produce some stunning work. I'll have a go at adding links.
 
Sue Rine
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Hmm, dunno how, but if you search 'raranga harakeke' it brings up some good websites.
 
Judith Browning
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Sue Rine wrote:Hmm, dunno how, but if you search 'raranga harakeke' it brings up some good websites.



RARANGA HARAKEKE
Here is a link to one of the sites....beautiful work....thanks, Sue

 
Sue Rine
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www.matapihiartgallery.com/raranga-hand-weaving.html
 
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