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"Tuning in" and talking to animals

 
Linda Sefcik
Posts: 72
Location: Central Oklahoma
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I believe that animals have a capacity for intellect, and not only do they
communicate with each other... and with other species... but they ALSO
talk to us...... we just haven't learned how to listen.

I believe that the indigenous American tribes of America understood.
I remember a story that... until the tribes were invaded by Europeans
their version of war was... touching the enemy... taking the enemy's
head dress... NOT killing and mauling each other.

I think animals do this to a certain degree, as well.
I had a cat once, and had her trained to come to me, and she was
well-behaved and polite. We had a visitor and what did she do... ?
she hopped up on the person's lap and walked all over him like he
wasn't there. She was boss. (I looked at her with a fierce, stern look
without a blink in my eye, (not hateful nor angry, just stern)
and when she got near me, I gently pushed her right off of the
furniture and onto the floor.) She was being uppity and rude.

I have also noticed that animals let you know that they are in your area.
They will make a noise... often a timid sounding noise.
When we react with outrage... "get out of here you raccoon you !!"
we are showing that WE are really the one who is impolite... not the raccoon.
The raccoon did what a polite animal should do... we... did... not.
And so... animals react to our insanity... with further rudenes. They do not respect.

I can see our human RUDENESS and IGNORANCE all the time.
I have figured that... this comes from our assumption that animals are stupid...
and have the mentality of... a human 5 year old. I think it is on the contrary...
I think animals are like our great-grandmothers... very wise... speaking with their eyes...
making clicking noises with their tongues... tearing up our messiness...
being brave enough to come into our space and SPANK US for our rudeness.

And to top it off... our pets play this game with us ... like...
"Sure, I'm stupid... but I also wiped my nose on your leg."

 
Ernie Schmidt
Posts: 81
Location: Olympia, Washington
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Hi Linda,
I have always said, "The people that don't think animals can talk to us, aren't listening." With a life time of observing and paying attention on my little farm I can point out to visitors what is happening by the sounds and actions of the different animals. I can tell you by the sounds coming from a brooder full of chicks what is going on without looking in to the brooder. I know the sound of a hen in a coop that is upset that she can't get into her favorite nest box to lay her egg because some one else is in there first. It doesn't always have to be a sound. Watching the body language of our "old man" pony, I can tell the children, "Don't pet him, his ears are laid back, he's in a grumpy mood." It is funny sometimes when people ask me how I know all these things about the animals and I answer, "Because I listen."
 
Jon Kennedy
Posts: 26
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Hi, just a quick though on something i have tried and used over the years is something I read about someplace in the distant past, is that animals dont speak english , so when you try to communicate think of what your trying to communicate in picture language, or by visualizing what your thoughts are,instead of talking to them. I believe it works. A picture is worth a thousand words!
 
Linda Sefcik
Posts: 72
Location: Central Oklahoma
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"animals don't speak English" -- sounds funny to say it --
Spanish?? German ??

I suppose a lot of communication is done with their eyes.
Most all animals have keen eyesight, hearing, and smell --
thus slight movements and sounds have immense depth.

When we don't see these and understand them...
they must think we are quite ignorant...
and so, you can imagine that they would be afraid of us
because by their standards... we are ignorant and rude.
 
Burra Maluca
Mother Tree
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Posts: 8791
Location: Portugal Zone 9 Mediterranean Climate
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bee bike books duck forest garden greening the desert solar trees wofati
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My current donkey is intelligent, supremely confident, and considers herself superior to any other creature. She treats me like a stupid foal, but is fairly tolerant of my lack of brainpower. Before we had her, we think she had never been free in a paddock but always tethered, so we wanted to train her to understand an electric fence so that we could let her run free. We set up a short section of 'live' fence where she could reach it from her tether but without getting tangled up around it. The boys kept an eye on her for a few hours. She considers anything male to be too stupid to understand anything, and took no notice of the boys the whole time, but they carefully observed her jumping out of her skin the first time she touched the fence, and then cautiously testing it first with her nose, and then with just her whiskers until she felt that she understood how it worked. When I turned up (I'm female, and, by donkey's definition, capable of understanding basic communication) she approached the fence, lined her body up at right angles to it, turned her head to face me and fixed me with a steely gaze, with her long white ears pointing straight at me until I noticed her. She does something similar if she sees something she thinks might be a predator, then turns her gaze to where she thinks it's hiding when she has our attention. When she was sure I was looking at her, she turned her head to the electric fence, stretched out her nose towards it, pretended (!) to touch it, and then jumped out of her skin again, before turning to me to see if I had noticed. Trying not to laugh, I went over and repeated what she had done. When she was happy that I'd learned about the new danger and knew how to handle it, she turned her back on me and got on with the serious business of grazing, leaving me to explain it to the men.

 
Linda Sefcik
Posts: 72
Location: Central Oklahoma
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Beautiful donkey story.
 
Kitty Hudson
Posts: 33
Location: SW KY--out in the sticks in zone 6.
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LOVE the donkey story!

Several years ago I had an experience with animals communicating that surprised (and saddened) me.

One of our 3 cats met a sudden death. 10 year old Linda had never been more than tolerant of the 2 year old Pete and Ollie, starving littermates that we had taken in, and for their part, they stayed out of her claw reach. A couple days after her death, Pete 'communicated' his concern to us over her absence. He normally trotted very quietly through the room, but this day he kathumped loudly through the room, coming to a sudden thudding halt right in the middle. He bounded noisily over to the TV and checked behind it where Linda sometimes slept, then equally noisily thundered over to the couch, leapt on the back and looked behind it to check her other preferreed nap area. Then he leapt to the floor, thumped over to the end table at my husbands elbow, jumped up on it (something he knew was not allowed) and stared at my husband with widened eyes. He had made enough noise to make sure we were watching, made it clear he was looking for Linda, and came to one of us for answers. He could not have said "Where the Hell iIS she?!?!" more clearly than if he had spoken the words.
 
Rion Mather
Posts: 644
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I had a dog that would smile when she was happy. She picked up that expression of communication as a young pup watching us. My current dog hates when I talk on the phone to someone else and will do everything to get my attention in order to communicate with her.

The Seneca believe that every life is sacred. I agree.
 
pato van ostra
Posts: 30
Location: 0deg lat, 1100m elev. Choco-Andean bioregion
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This documentary blew my mind on what was possible as far as communicating with animals goes:

culture unplugged - The Animal Communicator
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