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Gardening and Composting Indoors...and pie  RSS feed

 
Tyler Hoff
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Hello, I am new to the website and am very eager to learn all this awesome knowledge!

I recently started up a window garden with about ten varieties of food and herbs. I have very limited space otherwise I'd be shooting for a big ole garden plot.
I am growing Aka Takana (Red Leaf Mustard), Purple Basil, Danyelle Lettuce, Kale, Miniature Greek Basil, Thyme, Oregano, Garlic Lemon Chives. Very Small Scale, plan to get as big as possible!

I will post pictures soon! As of right now Im looking to build some sort of composter that will work inside or a small one that I can put up outside my door. I work at Scotty's Table in Missoula and we use mostly organic materials, unfortunately comes scraps. I have been wanting to save them for personal composting or donation to someone who will use them. I just hate seeing perfectly good organic scrap fill up our landfills and not be utilized .
I have very limited space and if anyone has had luck with any indoor composting or on the small scale. Please let me know. If not does anyone know of anyone accepting food scraps by the pound. I got lots!
 
Judith Browning
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Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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Welcome to permies, Tyler!
 
Miles Flansburg
steward
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Location: Zones 2-4 Wyoming and 4-5 Colorado
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Howdy Tyler, have you heard of vermicomposting ? I had a crawlspace in one house that I lived in, and I put a 55 gallon drum, that I had cut in half long ways, down there and got some worms . They did a great job. I have seen some examples of folks building really nice wooden boxes covered with cutting boards that they kept right in the kitchen.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vermicompost
 
Josh Chance
Posts: 20
Location: Fort Collins, CO, E of Rockies, semi-arid, zone 5, elev. 5K ft, precip. 16 in, snowfall 54in, clay
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Wanted to add to Wyomiles vermicompost recommendation that worms roughly eat about a pound of food per square foot of bedding surface area per week.

I don't remember how many worms you need, unfortunately. My experience is the worms will regulate themselves based on space, food, and quality of bedding. This way you can weigh your organic waste after a week of collection to get a rough estimate of how much surface area you need.

Another option is bokashi, but you need to be able to bury the "bokashi'd" compost after it has fermented.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bokashi_composting#Bokashi_composting
 
Betty Montgomery
Posts: 52
Location: Lone Oak, TX
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I agree with Mr. Hogan, Tyler. However you don't need to start with big drums if you don't have the space. You can get one of those ubiquitous plastic bins that will fit under your kitchen sink. Preferably recycle one. That, some old news paper, some red wrigglers and those yummy scraps would have you in business in no time as a worm rancher. If the bin happens to be opaque all the better as worms prefer it dark and it doesn't even need a lid. Just something to lay over it to keep it moist enough for the worms.
Oh, and I know where of I speak as I have my own little worm ranch under my own kitchen sink. You will need a larger bin than mine though as you have more scraps.
Ever consider talking your bosses into expanding their business? With that much scrap they could grow lots of worms to sell to farmers or gardeners, some fine fertilizer for them as well as, fish food/bait. Be sure to mention extra income sources a lot when you mention it to them as well as possibly cutting down on disposal costs.
 
Clara Florence
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I composted in my apartment with worms in a large storage tub that was utilised as a coffee table. It really is smell free. Composting vegetables will produce a fair amount of liquid in the tub. Rather than having holes in the bottom of my tub I just drained the excess liquid off periodically or topped up the bedding with coconut fibre to absorb it. Nothing composts faster than worms, they make the best pets ever.
 
julian kirby
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Dont forget you can use 5 gallon containers, cut into the side, and have more space to garden! also there is a very nice modular DIY flow through Vermicomposting bin plan on Google that uses 5 gallon buckets and is adaptable to any plastic container.
 
julian kirby
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Michael Milligan
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Where ever you are getting these scraps, look around and see where you can pile them up there! Even just punching holes in a 5 gal buckets and putting your scraps in there at the edge of the property or by the dumpsters.

The reason I say this is that food scraps are currently useless and of very very low value. BUT, if you fill buckets on site, after they have rotted and drained out most of their water you can just take the bucket full of compost home.

OR make a worm bin on site. I'm just into using the least effort needed, and waiting a while then taking home compost seems like more reword for the calorie input, imho.

PS... I bet you can even get the buckets on site, right?
 
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