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Eggs and dogs...Keeping dogs out of Coop?

 
Tawny Crawford
Posts: 6
Location: Texas
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Our Chickens, geese, and ducks all share a common coop. The chickens mostly lay up high in nesting boxes or in duck/geese nest basically on the ground of the coop. We have a Buff goose trying to sit. Unfortunately we have a young pup who has discovered just how yummy those eggs can be! I have seen many put cattle panels in the door to the coop to keep dogs and bigger animals out, But I am not sure my geese could fit. Any ideas on ways to keep the pup out of our eggs?
 
Jay Green
Posts: 587
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You can put a PVC "Y" shaped yolk around his neck until he learns and gets big enough to stay out of the pop door. Some people use these on LGDs to keep them from going through pasture fences and taking a walk about. It doesn't hurt them and it's lightweight but it keeps him from getting his front end into the space.

Some chain dogs to a chunk of wood or similar bulky weight to keep them from going through spaces and openings. I'd be leary of this for a pup...I could just see one hanging himself in one way or another with a contraption like that.

Some folks bait an egg...blow it out and fill it with something the dog will remember, like hot sauce, citronella oil, etc. You can even hang a citronella oil soaked rag over the opening of the pop door and most dogs won't go near it. Ever. It's best to use the citronella essential oil to get the best deterrent power.

Shock collars work well and it doesn't take much of a charge for a pup...more like a strong vibration.
 
Walter Jeffries
Posts: 1085
Location: Mountains of Vermont, USDA Zone 3
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Train them. Start with basic obedience training and work your way up from there. In time they're valuable help mates on the farm and homestead. They want to work with you and do the right thing. It's a pack mentality. They need to learn what is right and what is wrong.
 
Scott Farmer
Posts: 11
Location: Nevada County, CA
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Walter Jeffries wrote:Train them. Start with basic obedience training and work your way up from there. In time they're valuable help mates on the farm and homestead. They want to work with you and do the right thing. It's a pack mentality. They need to learn what is right and what is wrong.


Yes! Rules, boundaries and limitations are of utmost importance, especially at this stage. I learned everything I know through The Dog Whisperer and friends and family have been Seeking my help with their pups for years now. My pup chased chickens the first time I brought him to the farm I'm working, but after that first day he lives in harmony with all the domesticated critters!

A vibration collar (shock is WAY overkill) can be a wonderful tool for teaching farm dogs their boundaries, as they are often not right next to you at the moment correction is required.
 
Lyvia Dequincey
Posts: 45
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Rules, boundaries, limits for dogs - I definitely agree! It takes a lot of time the first year, but you end up with a wonderful dog.

Here's my two cents on dog training, for what it's worth.

Every normal dog knows/learns that somebody leads the pack. The leader controls all the food, the doorways, and the beds. The leader has the right to call "Mine" on anything, and the underling dog will drop it/ leave it/not go there.

So first you have to be the leader by controlling the food, the doorways, and the beds. Say excuse me, and push your puppy out of a doorway with your toe. If he doesn't start to move when you say excuse me, get more firm. Find a level of non-violent non-painful correction that works for you and your dog, and be extremely consistent. No relenting because they are so cute when asleep. Remember that correction only applies for a few minutes at most. When it's over, it's over. But once the pup will vacate a door or bed for you, and allow you to mess with his food, then you should be able to make him leave anything else alone. When you first ask, be harsh in your voice, soft in your touch. If you were three years old, and telling another three year old to leave your toy alone, what would your voice sound like? A reminder can be less harsh, once the dog has learned words like drop it, excuse me, or off. But initiallly it is the harshness of your tone (and eventually the dog's name) that tells the dog this is a command and not just human blah blah noise.

Then put something tempting of yours, like your hamburger, in the doorway, and when he shows interest, let him hear "mine!" Let him approach and be warned off a few times. Push him away when he gets too close. Praise him if he shows you his belly, or licks you while looking away, or sits. This is acknowledgement of your leadership. Then when he can relax and let it be, remove the food, take him somewhere else, and let him sit for a treat or a rub. Because you own the dog, and the food, and he should know that sitting is good behavior that goes along with the happy voice and treats.

Hope that helps.

 
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