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Can anyone identify this leaf

 
Will LeSure
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This particular "plant is growing in my flowerbed. I removed some old shrubs and I can see the long stems growing underground. They spread like wildfire, chop them down they come right back.
leaf.JPG
[Thumbnail for leaf.JPG]
 
Dennis Lanigan
Posts: 171
Location: Philomath, OR
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Is it common mallow? Malva neglecta http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/crops/facts/ontweeds/common_mallow.htm I think I'm right. What do I win?
 
Ken Peavey
steward
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Location: FL
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Dollarweed aka Hydrocotyle umbellata.

 
chrissy bauman
Posts: 131
Location: Sunset Zone 27, Florida
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where is the garden located?
 
Denice Moffat
Posts: 30
Location: U.S.A.
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I vote for Mallow (it would be a really tough and deep root) or maybe a geranium. I guess the flower will decide mid summer!
 
Devon Olsen
Posts: 1062
Location: SE Wyoming -zone 4
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if it is mallow, it is edible, i quite enjoy the little cheese wheel-like things that come around in the summer
 
Samantha Lewis
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If it is Mallow it is lovely for paths. It can take heavy traffic and needs little water.
 
Chris Watson
Posts: 85
Location: North of Detroit (5b to 6a)
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If it's geranium, the leaf will have a distinctive smell (similar to tomato leaves) that you can't easily get off your hands.
 
dj niels
Posts: 177
Location: CO; semi-arid: 10-12"; 6000 ft
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There are several things to consider in order to arrive at a correct conclusion. Is there anyone near you who might know that plant? We might need to see the whole plant to know for sure. What size are the leaves?( I know that in different climates plants can be larger or smaller than in other places. Here, for example, most plants seem to grow slower and stay smaller than I have seen elsewhere.) Also, the habitat ( the second posting had a link to a plant that said it was aquatic--is there a lot of moisture in that bed?). In the class I took on botany of plants, we were told it was important to see flowers and fruits to get a positive id on any plant, because many plants have similar shaped leaves. Also, to see the plant in all seasons. Is it an annual? Does it come back from the roots? Does it have a woody stem? etc.

I have a lot of malva all over my yard. I actually encourage it, because it is great to add some leaves to a green smoothy.The leaves on mine are quite small, but the plant spreads readily so I just break off a stem and pick the leaves off of it. Dr. Christopher, a great herbologist from Utah, said malva and hollyhocks are all related to Marshmallow herb, and all are great medicinal plants that have been used for healing poultices, used to heal sores. He even used soaks of marshmallow root to heal gangrene in someone's feet. And he recommended marshmallow root, powdered, as a nourishing, soothing 'gruel' for someone who couldn't eat solid food because of digestive problems.
 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
Posts: 4434
Location: North Central Michigan
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looks similar to the mallow we have..but not exactly..but there are several types of mallow..the one that we have that has a super deep taproot goes all the way to middle earth.

it grows fairly tall and seeds prolifically everywhere..opportunistic. But yes it is edible the leaves, flowers and the "cheese wheels"as was mentioned above while sitll green..also the deer totally love it so it is probably great forage..

don't plant it where you don't want something taking over..and it WILL withstand some shade also
 
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