• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Mike Jay Haasl
  • Burra Maluca
garden masters:
  • James Freyr
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Dave Burton
  • Pearl Sutton

Composting algea and other "pest" aquatic plants

 
Posts: 26
Location: Missouri
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I was thinking about this when I was driving around the countryside today and at the number of ponds nearby I thought if all of the stuff that accumulates in ponds is not harmful to compost piles it would be not only a good source of nitrogen but also moisture for the piles of leaves and cardboard. Not to mention I bet some people would even be willing to pay for the removal. Which is the tenant of permaculture right? Knocking out 2-3 birds with one stone? My only question for you is; what would be the negatives, the things I'm not thinking of?
 
steward
Posts: 4618
Location: Zones 2-4 Wyoming and 4-5 Colorado
441
hugelkultur forest garden fungi books bee greening the desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Take this with a grain of salt cuz I am not sure if it would be a real problem, but I would wonder if any pesticides , fertilizers or other polutants that are carried to the ponds by runoff would end up in the aquatic plants and then end up on your garden ?

Maybe someone with more knowledge will chime in on that.
 
pollinator
Posts: 1523
Location: northern California
150
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Any relatively active compost process is an excellent way to break down most organic chemicals, including pesticides. I think the bigger challenge would be how to gather together enough of the stuff to provide a worthwhile volume. I'm thinking of algae. Other aggressive water plants are a lot more bulky and might be easier to gather....
 
Tim Luden
Posts: 26
Location: Missouri
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Alder Burns wrote:Any relatively active compost process is an excellent way to break down most organic chemicals, including pesticides. I think the bigger challenge would be how to gather together enough of the stuff to provide a worthwhile volume. I'm thinking of algae. Other aggressive water plants are a lot more bulky and might be easier to gather....



I think one average to smaller pond would produce quite a bit. Think about any time you've been fishing and gotten snagged, how heavy it is to pull up a mess and hope your bait is still there after getting the mess off the hook.
 
Posts: 135
Location: Sunset Zone 27, Florida
forest garden trees rabbit
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
as long as it was a really well-managed hot compost pile, you shouldn't have any problems with the few water-borne pathogens (pseudomonas comes to mind). overall, sounds like a great plan!
 
Trust God, but always tether your camel... to this tiny ad.
A rocket mass heater heats your home with one tenth the wood of a conventional wood stove
http://woodheat.net
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!