• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Seeds germiating in mulch - what to do?  RSS feed

 
Jp Learn
Posts: 80
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
So, I noticed some seedheads in my straw mulch that look like they are germinating..pic below (with some pine needle mulch as this picture was close to where some blueberry bushes are planted...


What to do now? I was thinking of removing it, which wouldn't be horribly laborious or costly, since it is relatively fresh, and just replacing it with fresh straw...seed free (ugh!)
 
Leila Rich
steward
Posts: 3999
Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
88
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Unless the root can make contact with the soil, the seed should use up all its energy germinating, and die.
With seeds that reach the soil and 'take', I find lifting wads of mulch to pull the young plant's roots out, then replacing it, generally does the trick.
 
Saybian Morgan
gardener
Posts: 582
Location: Lower Mainland British Columbia Canada Zone 8a/ Manchester Jamaica
8
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
If you think there rank offenders in your mulch just fluff it with a pitch fork and they'll uproot if they have rooted. I try to have conditions where nothing green is an enemy even creeping buttercups, but hitting then early and simply can save you back if your in the mood to do something. I've put 100 bales on my garden but the ducks haven't let me see more than a tuft of grass here and there that's not a mouthful for a rabbit.
 
Jp Learn
Posts: 80
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Wow.

I'm shocked that neither of you thought it wise to just remove the mulch.

Seems like it could prevent quite a headache later if the seeds were to get growing.

I remember reading they can be a major pain to get rid of if they are given the opportunity.
 
Leila Rich
steward
Posts: 3999
Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
88
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Jp Learn wrote:I'm shocked that neither of you thought it wise to just remove the mulch.
Seems like it could prevent quite a headache later if the seeds were to get growing.

Don't be
In my experience, seeds in mulch are pretty easy to deal with in the ways described, wheres finding weed-free mulch is pretty rare.
Weed-free and cash free? Nigh-on impossible!
 
Robert Ray
gardener
Posts: 1351
Location: Cascades of Oregon
12
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
One thing I'm cautious about is "weed free" straw and hay, which sometimes means that it is a herbicide resistant crop and there is a danger of introducing material that has been treated with a herbicide in the field and now introduced to the garden.
Even with manure from animals that have eaten treated hay it can affect beds that it is applied to. Weed free doesn't always mean a good thing.
A good scuffle of the mulch when you see a germinating seed is all you need.
 
Jp Learn
Posts: 80
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks so much for taking the time to write, y'all.

There's so many seed heads though...hundreds probably....still no worries?
 
John Polk
steward
Posts: 8019
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
289
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Unless those sprouts can work their way into the soil, they will quickly perish.
If you have chickens, let them wander around the mulch.
They will gladly do your weeding for you.
(Just get them out of the garden before you plant anything that you do want. LOL)

 
Jp Learn
Posts: 80
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Cool...thanks all!
 
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!