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Is there such thing as an albino fava bean plant?

 
ivy young
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I recently planted fava beans as a cover crop. The seed was purchased from the bulk bins at a natural foods store but I do not believe it is organic. Anyway, one of the plants emerged yellowish white. I don't mean spotted or that the leaves started turning yellow after a while, but truly the whole plant is yellow/white. Has anyone heard of/ experienced this. I can not find any info on the web. Just curious. Maybe I'll save the seed instead of digging it in. Thanks.
 
Alder Burns
pollinator
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Location: northern California
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Just about any kind of plant can rarely throw a mutant without chlorophyll. The seedling will grow for a while until the nutrient reserves in the seed are exhausted and then die, since the green chlorophyll is necessary to extract energy from sunlight. I doubt your albino fava will survive to flowering size. If it does, it means there is at least a little green in there somewhere, but it won't be nearly as vigorous as it's normal kin. Might be an interesting curiosity. Most variegated plants with white patterning on their leaves started out as "sports" among all-green siblings, and they are usually less vigorous when grown side-by-side.....
 
ivy young
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Thanks Alder. I suppose that makes sense. At about 3 weeks it is as tall and vigorous as its neighbors but I will keep watching and see what happens. Thanks!
 
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