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jerusalem artichokes

 
Jean-Sebastien Busque
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Can you ferment jerusalem artichokes ?
 
Brenda Groth
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Oh great question, I have read that you can..would like info as well ..have tons of JA's
 
Devon Olsen
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great question, i will definately be awaiting an answer as i have some sunchokes on the way

i think i may have shared my sunchoke source too much over the winter though, half the varieties i wanted to buy were sold out when i went to buy them
 
Sandor Katz
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YES! Absolutely. Jerusalem artichokes/sunchokes ferment beautifully, either raw or cooked.
 
tel jetson
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that might redeem them for me. not a fan of them fermenting in my gut, nor are those in my general vicinity.
 
Xisca Nicolas
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Tel, I understand you VERY well!
I just want to ferment all what has sugar in it!
I guess this could be the best way to digest starch and other sugar like JA much easier!
For our pancreas sake.

I also ferment cheese for this reason, we are not supposed to be good at managing well the lactose, which is a sugar...
As critters to some job for us in the garden, let some of these tiny critters also do some good tiring job for us too!
 
Robert Ray
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I have some fermenting right now, I moved a bed and kept out a few to try.
 
dj niels
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Robert, what are you doing with your JA? I have a bunch I need to use/store, but they don't store very long as they are.
 
Robert Ray
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The fermented pickles turned out great and it does appear to lessen the social effect. I have about a gallon of dehydrated slices that I've intended on turning to flour but haven't yet I'll be trying pasta and bread with that flour the garden has consumed most of my free time the last few weeks.
 
Jay Vinekeeper
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Location: Northwest Lower MI
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Back in the 70's and 80's Helianthus tuberosa was considered a serious energy crop.

Seemed to make some sense then. High production per acre which could be harvested every year or every other year and automatically replant itself from the many bits of tuber left in the soil after harvest.
It would then be fermented, turned in alcohol (fuel) and used to transport and work.

I personally knew an old farmer who had planted a seven+ acre field entirely to Jerusalem artichoke.

Don't know why it didn't take off. Anyone remember?
 
dj niels
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How do you make the pickles? Do you have a recipe or instructions you can share? I have seen several comments about making fermented pickles, but no details about how to do it. Unless I just missed that discussion and don't know where to find it. And I never thought of trying to make them into flour--gluten-free and all that. Sounds like a winner for someone like me who is gluten-intolerant. Do you just dry them in slices and then powder them in a blender?
 
Robert Ray
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I use 3tbsp of salt per quart of water and cover the Jerusalem artichoke slices in mason jar with an airlock. I usually have kefir or some kind of pickle working on the counter.
My other half is gluten i tolerant and I love making bread. I am always looking for flours that help with texture and flavor for GF recipes.
I sliced the jerusalem artichokes thin and dried them to the brittle stage I'll then run them through the blender or flour mill.
 
dj niels
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Thanks, Robert. But what do you mean by a mason jar with an airlock? sealed ina canner?
 
Robert Ray
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I use a lid that has an airlock like one would use when making wine of beer on a mason jar. I made my own though you can buy them. You just want to keep the future pickles under the brine or away from air. I've also used glass discs that are made for pickling in mason jars. It's no different than making sauerkraut.
Take a spin around this forum there are several threads about pickling in jars it's really very simple, many you tube vids too.
 
dj niels
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I guess I don't know what to search for--my search didn't turn up anything about how to pickle in jars. The only way I know to make pickles is to use vinegar and a canner.

I just did a search online, and found some sites, but I am very confused about the whole airlock and bung thing.
 
Robert Ray
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DJ here is how I do my pickles. I mix 3tbsp sea salt with one quart of boiling water. I pour the water over my sliced artichokes that are in a clean canning jar. What you want to do is keep the artichoke slices under the brine. You don't need an air lock or anything fancy. A regular lid place on loosely so fermenting gas can escape. I place my jar on the counter out of the sun. I check them after a week but find that 10 to 14 days depending on what I am fermenting give me the degree of sour that I like. Try googling fermented pickle or search here for fermented pickles.

http://www.wildfermentation.com/making-sour-pickles-2/
 
Ollie Puddlemaker
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DJ - Maybe this is what you are wanting to know more about, it is one way to ferment for some people...Pickl-It and Fido are dominate suppliers in this concept that have moved away from crocks and just submerging a ferment.

http://www.picklemetoo.com/2012/05/04/pickl-it-jars-are-they-worth-it/

http://www.pickl-it.com/faq/

http://www.pickl-it.com/products/

This is probably similar to what Ray does or he uses a metal lid with seal...

http://traditionalandnatural.com/2013/01/01/diy-all-glass-airlock-fermentation-jars/

 
Ollie Puddlemaker
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'similar to what Robert Ray does'...
 
Robert Ray
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I like the all glass ones Ollie.
fermenting lid.jpg
[Thumbnail for fermenting lid.jpg]
fermenting lid 2.jpg
[Thumbnail for fermenting lid 2.jpg]
 
dj niels
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Thanks everyone for the tips to help a newbie.
 
David Hartley
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Great to see you on these forums, Mr Katz

Glad to know you still have your health... Your Wild Fermentation book was the first dedicated fermentation book I purchased when first learning about this wonderful art
 
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