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Caroline Baines
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Location: South Florida
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What is everyone's favorite way to preserve quail eggs?

Caroline
 
tel jetson
steward
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Location: woodland, washington
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can't say I've ever preserved any, but I did eat my first quail egg a couple of weeks ago. raw on some grated yam and rice. there was a language barrier involved. not bad, though.

with quail laying so reliably, why do you want to preserve the eggs?
 
Caroline Baines
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Location: South Florida
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Because I have too many to eat myself. It would be nice to have some stored for the winter months when they slow down - I'm also looking for new ways to incorporate them into my diet.

Raw? I haven't tried them raw and don't plan to. Both my nieces ate a raw one last weekend and they said they didn't taste that good...
 
tel jetson
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apart from water glass or dilute lime putty, I'm not much help for preservation ideas. but back to raw eggs: cocktails are a great way to use eggs. your favorite liquor, an egg (or four if they're quail), something sweet, something acid, maybe something creamy, ice, shake it all up real hard and strain. lovely.
 
Jennifer Jennings
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Location: 39.720014, -74.875139 - Waterford Works, NJ
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You could try the ancient Chinese approach to egg preservation - century eggs. Says Wikipedia:
The traditional method for producing century eggs is a development and improvement from the aforementioned primitive process. Instead of using just clay, a mixture of wood ash, quicklime, and salt is included in the plastering mixture, thereby increasing its pH and sodium content. This addition of natural alkaline compounds improved the odds of creating century eggs instead of spoilage and also increased the speed of the process. A recipe for creating century eggs through this process starts with the infusion of three pounds of tea in boiling water. To the tea, three pounds of quicklime (or seven pounds when the operation is performed in winter), nine pounds of sea salt, and seven pounds of wood ash from burned oak is mixed into a smooth paste. While wearing gloves to prevent the lime corroding the skin, each egg is individually covered by hand, then rolled in a mass of rice chaff to keep the eggs from adhering to one another before they are placed in cloth-covered jars or tightly woven baskets. The mud slowly dries and hardens into a crust over several months, and then the eggs are ready for consumption.

Even though the traditional method is still widely practiced, modern understanding of the chemistry behind the formation of century eggs has led to many simplifications in the recipe. For instance, soaking the eggs in a brine of salt, calcium hydroxide, and sodium carbonate for 10 days followed by several weeks of aging while wrapped in plastic is said to achieve the same effect as the traditional method. This is because egg-curing in both the new and traditional methods is accomplished by introducing hydroxide ions and sodium into the egg.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Century_egg

They don't look appealing, but they say they are tasty...
 
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