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How should a kitchen be organized for fermenting?  RSS feed

 
Xisca Nicolas
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Location: La Palma (Canary island) Zone 11
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I am in a renovating process, so I can still take some criteria into account!

For example, I have already planned the place for rinsing sprouts under the sink.
So I also want to take fermenting into account.
People stop sprouting when it is not quick and easy.
Same with fermenting?

I may not think about all the precise questions to ask, so this is opened.
I think that LF veggies needs nothing special, and they keep easy and long.
But many more things can be fermented.

I have a question about temperatures. I have read that this is an obvious issue.
So I think that 2 places are needed. What temperature are needed as warm and as cold?

About heat:
Someone spoke about the need of a "sitter" when going away during cold weather. The visit in Japan mention that temperature is maintained thanks to the koji fermenting process...
Well, I have no oven! An insulated little room?

About cold:
When the food is fermented, then you need a fresher place to slow down the process!
Well... I try to leave with no fridge... I can get a constant 16°C in a cave.

then, is humidity to be watched when you do thinks like tempeh, miso...?
Miso needs 1 year, where do you keep it and with what regular temperature?

Ever thought about conceiving a home kitchen that helps to be comfortable at making all this regularly?
Yes, it should be comfortable when you have to be regular for new batches.
 
Sandor Katz
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Different ferments have different ideal temperatures, and some are quote versatile. A cool zone is great for fermenting vegetables. In temperate climates, this has traditionally been an unheated cellar. A cave could be perfect for this, and caves are among the classic environments for aging cheeses. Some ferments need a warm environment. Yogurt is generally incubated at 43-46 degrees C; tempeh and koji at 30-32 degrees C. Tempeh and koji also need a humid environment. But most ferments can be done in a range of temperature zones, faster in warmer temps, slower in cooler temps. You could certainly design a kitchen with appropriate zones, but you would want an idea of what specifically you were intending to ferment.
 
Xisca Nicolas
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Location: La Palma (Canary island) Zone 11
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Sandor Katz wrote:But most ferments can be done in a range of temperature zones, faster in warmer temps, slower in cooler temps. You could certainly design a kitchen with appropriate zones, but you would want an idea of what specifically you were intending to ferment.


Thanks, very good information! I want koji, miso and tempeh.
Does tempeh need the same?

Greens too, but there is no problem for this. Normal kitchen + cave or cellar seem enough.
Then I want to age and ferment normal raw goat cheese. (I have made a specific post about it, as I have started to experiment, and the result is "strong"!).
Meat will come later... I would like to stay off-fridge...

In my kitchen, I can easily close one part and transform it into a little warm room, if 165cm x 90cm is enough.
(5' 5" x 2' 11")
 
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