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Seeking help in acquiring dogbane or Indian hemp to help draw hummingbird moths.

 
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Hello! I am looking for more folks who have plants or seeds of dogbane or Indian hemp to help attract hummingbird moths year after year. I've heard a lot of great benefits for Native American use of the plant since I have an ethnobotany garden. I've seen hummingbird moths a few times at my community gardens a couple of years ago. Please reach me if you all need me. Peace!
 
gardener
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Dogbane is a common roadside wildflower around here. The blossoms attract lots of butterflies and moths. I am a bit cautious about introducing it into my garden though because it may spread and take over.
P5297521.jpg
Large patch of dogbane
Large patch of dogbane
 
Blake Lenoir
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How we keep the plants from spreading to secure a balanced habitat?  How many of them we need in our gardens to reduce spreading?
 
pollinator
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I find that dogbane only inhabits poor or thin soil and doesn’t grow at all on rich soil, at least in the wild, so I wouldn’t be terribly afraid of them spreading, though if I lived near such poor soils I would appreciate it. There is a patch nearby with very nice tall stalks, beside a gravel driveway in the mountains and overhung by pines, that I have been gathering from for fiber, and so I have some seeds. It might be worth looking at a local wildflower seed company or dividing from a wild patch first. I have found it very hard to start wildflowers from seed. But if you can’t find any and you’re in a relatively similar climate so that they have a better chance of success, you can PM me about it—I should be able to send a few.

I hope your growing goes well!
 
May Lotito
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https://www.illinoiswildflowers.info/prairie/plantx/dogbanex.htm
Illinois wildflowers website says dogbane can spread through rhizomes in moist area. If that's a concern, maybe someone can harvest the materials for fiber like Maieshe does.

I went by the area where the dogbane patch grows and took a picture.
Resized_20240312_134259.jpeg
Dogbane
Dogbane
 
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In my garden this last season Dogbane was supporting a diverse population of flies, bees and wasps- before you go eeyew!, I'm talking tiny, 1/4 inch and smaller species known for eating pests (usually in the larval stage: watch "The Alien") So I'm keeping it around. You can tell the difference between Flies/Dipterans ("two wings) because unlike the Hymenopterans ("membrane-winged") they can fly backwards, due to the missing wings being modified into little "drumsticks" that balance things out with a counter-beat. Most of them were flashing black and yellow warning colors, even if they were "flying liars", or is that "lying fliers"? The seeds for dogbane are like tiny milkweed seeds- a close relative, and also have silk "parachutes" even though the pods are very skinny.
 
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