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compost tea smell

 
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Im making some compost tea for the first time and it stinks

I put fresh cut clover dandelion plantain and grass into a large tub and filled with water and covered it, ive been stirring it once a day and now after four days it smells exactly like cow manure. Is this how it should smell or should i remove the cover or what else could i do
 
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Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even Soil:SandyLoam pH6 Flat
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I have no ideas how to make compost tea.
However I do know that to make worm compost tea, you leave the cover off in fact you go so far as to put a bubble making tube in the "water".
So as to encourage good oxygen loving bacteria, not the bad disease ones
 
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^ What he said

You'll want to set up a bubbler in the container. Strong enough to overcome the pressure of the water, but not so vigorous as to harm the developing fungi and bacteria... Depending on ambient temperatures, it should only take 1~3 days; assuming temps are between 60~80degF.
 
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If I may ask, what is your intent in making compost tea?

From my experience... For you to be making compost tea, there should be a source of humus (compost, earthworm castings). I didn't see any in your post, so that's definitely something to include in your mix if its not in there already. I use 1 cup/ 4 gallons of water with tremendous success. That said, compost tea is intended to be an aerobic process, and when something smells bad, it indicates anaerobic conditions. Like the other folks indicated, you could run an air pump through the bucket. This will feed the microbes and allow them to multiply. They consume oxygen and expel carbon dioxide, just like humans. For this multiplication to happen, unsulphured blackstrap molasses is also beneficial to the reproduction of these organisms. You could use 1 tsp per gallon of water, just don't over due it otherwise it will turn your soil crusty.

If you wanted to keep it simple, and omit the air pump, don't "brew" your tea for more than 24-36 hours. Add some molasses and a humus source and consistently agitate the solution. Also, chopping up the plant material as finely as possible will ensure a quicker break down of the material. Your nose will tell you of the success of your brew. If it smells like sweet earth, it will give you sweet earth. If it smells like baby puke..

Anyways, this is an extremely comprehensive guide to compost teas and much, more. I have followed this advice with great success. I would encourage you to look into this site if you are really interested in properly making "teas".

http://www.microbeorganics.com

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