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Chicken had a stroke?

 
John Elliott
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So a couple of days ago, I hear some unusual squawking from the chicken tractor and I go to investigate. One of my Barred Rocks is lame on one side, can't stand up on that leg, and the wing on that side is drooping. Thinking it might have taken a hard fall off of the roost, I decided to just observe. This is a young bird, not more than 2 years old. Next morning, bird is not much improved, but can hop on one leg and keep the other chickens from getting her scratch feed by laying on top of it and pecking. So by this time, I'm thinking it wasn't a fall, but maybe the bird has a neurological problem -- can chickens have strokes? I guess anything with a brain (even if it is a chicken size brain) and a circulatory system can have something go haywire. I don't want to give up and put the bird in the stew pot, she is a good egg layer. Even through all this she is still laying, although on the ground, because she can't jump up to the nest box.

This morning, bird was pretty much like yesterday, no worse, but no better. Then I came up with an idea -- natto! I had 3 little single servings of natto in the freezer and wondered if nattokinase would work on chickens. I know it's been three days or so, should I have thought of this earlier, would it work on neurological damage or a clot after this length of time? So I tried it, a dose of one teaspoon of natto beans this morning, one hand feeding the lame chicken and the other hand shooing the others away. A few hours later and chicken is noticeably better! Knowing that the chicken digestive system is much faster than the human one, I'm thinking maybe I need to give it more often. For humans, natto persists for about 24 hours in the system, but it usually doesn't take more that a couple or three doses for the nattokinase to do its clot busting magic.

Any comments? Have I lost it completely?
 
S Bengi
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Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even distribution
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I really like your post. I dont think I would have thought about giving the chicken natta.
I am glad that the natto did help.

Personally if my chicken is sickly/dying I would not eat it, due to the harmful hormones that they are releasing.
And the possible that I am now ingesting whatever chemical/biological agent that got them that sick.
If the chicken is a pet then keep it otherwise cull it from your flock. (I have been told that I am cull happy though)
 
John Elliott
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You sound like it -- cull happy, that is. Are you sure you aren't part weasel? Fox maybe?

Chicken is doing much better this morning, walking around, but still limping a bit. It was the kind of injury that, in the wild, would have led to her being culled by the next predator to come along looking for an easy meal.

I've been telling myself that I should learn to prepare natto in a way that hides the revolting taste, since it's supposed to be good for me. Now I have visible evidence that it works. Well, maybe just anecdotal evidence, since my sample size is 1 in this experiment. And actually, if you chop up pickles and onions and stir them into the natto, it hides a lot of the taste.
 
I agree. Here's the link: https://richsoil.com/wood-heat.jsp
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