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Used Cedar Siding

 
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I picked up some used (slightly abused) cedar siding. It's tapered, lap siding, maybe 7" wide, 14 foot lengths, 12 pieces and other small pieces. There is well-weathered stain on the surface. No idea what stain it was years ago when it was applied. It was free. I suppose Paul wanted me to post this to determine if it would be OK to use on TL.
 
pollinator
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Rather than mess with old stain, the stuff can usually be put on backwards if drippings haven't made it there. The thick edge can be shaved by a 16th to get rid of stain there.
Now you've got reasonably new looking raw wood.
 
Tim Skufca
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Is the presence of the old stain an aesthetic or a toxic issue?
 
Dale Hodgins
pollinator
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I think it's mostly a looks thing. Turned backwards, it will stay put for the life of the product. So if it never gets composted there's no issue. Often, old stain presents a flakey or powdery surface that buggers up the new finish. It can be easier to start with plain wood.
 
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Tim Skufca wrote:Is the presence of the old stain an aesthetic or a toxic issue?



Gosh, I do know that Paul does not want any conventional paints or stains used in the areas of the lab that will be beyond organic and even beyond most permaculture standards. So I think to Paul it would be a toxic issue though Dale has some great ideas to help with the aesthetics.

Currently, at base camp, there is a pile of some old wood with paint on it (from the previous owners) that I overheard Paul ask Tim to take to the dump instead of burning it.
 
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I don't think stains have near the toxic gick potential as paint--no lead or other heavy metals in stain, is there?

My view is I would rather sequester mild gick in a way such as Dale suggests than let the landfill release it into the air or groundwater.
 
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