• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

milk - the other antifungal  RSS feed

 
Leah Sattler
Posts: 2603
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I need to file this away in the permanent part of my brain! i wonder if a back pack sprayer would clog with milk?

http://www.abc.net.au/science/news/stories/s667732.htm
 
                              
Posts: 461
Location: Inland Central Florida, USA
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hum.

That is interesting.  I actually trialed milk against powdery mildew a couple years back.  I did not find the milk to be very effective against the powdery mildew on pumpkins, squash or zucchini.

In my research I came across some info that the milk would be more effective against downy mildew because it changes the pH on the leaves which disrupts the downy mildew.  However, powdery mildew tends to attack plants suffering potassium deficiency so milk might not be effective there.  Sea weed extract might be more help for spraying to prevent powdery mildew.

I've also been told that worm tea is a great spray to prevent powdery mildew.

For me though, in the past few years I'm starting to figure that on the squash, zucchini, pumpkins and other plants in that family, I just kinda ignore the powdery mildew as something inevitable in my climate on those plants and I still usually get plenty of yield even with the sick plants.
 
Jordan Lowery
pollinator
Posts: 1528
Location: zone 7
12
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
good link, i have found by personal experiments that fresh raw milk works best. only problem is most have a hard time finding raw milk.
 
Leah Sattler
Posts: 2603
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
soil wrote:
good link, i have found by personal experiments that fresh raw milk works best. only problem is most have a hard time finding raw milk.


cool! so it worked for you! I don't suppose it would work somewhere or some year when it was an awful problem but maybe for those borderline times/places.
 
                              
Posts: 461
Location: Inland Central Florida, USA
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Well I can say I didn't use raw milk in my experiments (I don't think you can get raw milk here unless you are squirting it out of a creature on your own property.)

Also, I'm in Humid central Florida where fungal problems are rather normal.
 
Jordan Lowery
pollinator
Posts: 1528
Location: zone 7
12
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
leah it does work pretty good, but i still prefer to use preventatives like earthworm castings tea and the likes. building healthy foliar life helps fight off anything that might try and attack the plants imo. in rare occasions the milk is needed.

TCLynx yea haha its real hard to get fresh milk, luckily we have a friend with a cow locally.
 
Jennifer Smith
Posts: 715
Location: Zone 5
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I tryed fresh goats milk in Lower Alabama and it didn't seem to work.
 
Leah Sattler
Posts: 2603
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
darn. I suppose Alabama is just as humid as OK and Iwe would be just as prone to growing fungal problems on foliage. I have only had a few occasions to use it....except for peach trees, but then I have all but given up on peaches. 
 
rose macaskie
Posts: 2134
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
  thanks i have midew on my vines. Cool, i just have to give them potassium and maybe fertiliser and a milk spray.
paul wheaton i woudl have thought you would have to rinse out the spout of your sprayer after spraying milk or you would block it up with milk.    rose .
 
Jocelyn Campbell
steward
Posts: 4220
Location: Missoula, MT
395
books food preservation forest garden hugelkultur toxin-ectomy
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Wow, how now brown cow!? 

I wonder how milk compares to chamomile tea (which I brought up in another thread)?

Maybe mixing the chamomile with TCLynx and soil's idea for compost tea? Not as likely to clog any way.

Ironically, I heard that simply spraying with water helps wash off the powdery mildew. Seems you'd want to dry it out, but I guess washing off the stuff helps.

Wish I could remember that baking soda recipe, too. That worked for me here in the damp Pacific NW, but I'm just not sure how the bicarbonate affects soil microorganisms and ph...
 
Jordan Lowery
pollinator
Posts: 1528
Location: zone 7
12
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
i use the chamomile method too. it would fall under my last post as
"but i still prefer to use preventatives like earthworm castings tea and the likes"

its also a good source of soluble nutrients for the plants.

there is one other method that works pretty good. rock powders. simply dust them on infected spots. wait a little bit then wash it off. cant really say what role is at play, im guessing the mineral rich dusts are not favorable to the PM, as well as the plant getting an extra boost to help itself.
 
Jennifer Smith
Posts: 715
Location: Zone 5
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I see it now,

not
"earthworm castings tea and the likes"

but
"earthworm castings, tea, and the likes,"

I had misread it also.
 
Jordan Lowery
pollinator
Posts: 1528
Location: zone 7
12
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
im sorry i should have been more clear.
 
Jennifer Smith
Posts: 715
Location: Zone 5
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
No apology necessary, I am easily confused.
 
paul wheaton
master steward
Posts: 22365
Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
bee chicken hugelkultur trees wofati woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I saw something at WSU that said that in their dairies they were looking at replacing bleach, as a disinfectant, with lactic acid.  Apparently, they were having really good success.

 
Leah Sattler
Posts: 2603
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
thats cool! I have thought about using vinegar as a teat dip and wash for the goats. I wonder if it would have similiar reasoning behind it?
 
Sarah Pope
Presenter
Posts: 49
Location: Tampa, Florida
2
 
We noticed he had no friends. So we gave him this tiny ad:
Thread Boost feature
https://permies.com/wiki/61482/Thread-Boost-feature
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!