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Looking for info on the best design for a rocket Pizza oven  RSS feed

 
john dooley
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I'm wanting to build a rocket oven for making pizza. I want the temp inside to get to about 900 degrees. I am a total noob and need all the info I can get. Does anyone know if the dual chambered cob oven plans are for a rocket oven? I saw the video of it on youtube and know that it burns cleaner than a regular brick oven. Maybe the plans they sell for that oven are all I need
 
allen lumley
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John Dooley : I added the Cob Forum Thread to your search field, to help you get good answers ! Please post which U-tube video you saw and liked - Big AL !
 
john dooley
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Here is the youtube address http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TvrUrnEIQoo
 
allen lumley
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John Dooley : Depending on what you have for a skill set the double chamber cob oven from ernieanderica.info are all that you will need, Ernie is a fanatic about testing
his builds for a least a year before releasing any plans, and I know he has more than a couple of cob ovens to his credit !

Again depending on the skill sets that you bring to the job you could look at the "rocket type'' bread oven from Aprovecho- To see that build go to You tube and enter
'Aprovecho Research Center' and Hunt for the Video Aprovevecho Rocket bread oven. This is a faster heating bread oven and can be used for small pizzas with about
the same amount of fuel as the cob oven from E + E. This model might work better for people with different skills! Hope this helps you make up your mind, G'Luck !

For the Craft, as always questions / comments are solicited and Welcome! Think like Fire! think like a Gas, Don't be the Marshmallow ! PYRO - Logically Big AL !
 
B Henderson
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I watched both of these videos...questions I have on both of them...
1. The double chamber - While it certainly burns cleaner, the appearance of that flame from the top seems like there is still a lot of energy wasted out the top.
2. The Aprovecho oven is great for everyday cooking, if you are only doing 1 or 2 items and then walking away. If it still uses the same amount of fuel as the double chamber, and the double chamber can cook for 8 hours, that seems like a lot of wasted fuel in exchange for a quick heatup time.

What I'm inspired to do is create a "hybrid" oven that marries the efficiency of a rocket oven (quick heating, cooks with air convection) with an option of an extended cook time (a stone oven, cooks with retained heat). I realize that a "hybrid" oven wouldn't be excellent at any one item (may require slightly longer firing, won't stay as hot as long), but I would like to have some flexibility so I can use it as a more of a primary cooking tool, rather than heating it up only on the weekends (at best) because I can't spend 4-6 hours during the week to heat the oven for a 60-90 minute cook time. Has anyone experimented with that concept?

Key items I am considering in my design:
1. rocket stove for quick, intense heating for shorter burn and cooking sessions
2. No floating floor to maximize oven space and flexibility. Plus, I would prefer to heat the cooking surface of the oven rather than heating the bottom of the cook floor and relying on circulating air to get the job done.
3. An option to direct fire the oven over a longer time to allow for a longer cooking session.
4. Creating an environment for a clean burn while capturing that additional heat and using it to heat the oven surface or air.


allen lumley wrote:John Dooley : Depending on what you have for a skill set the Double chamber cob oven from ernieanderica.info are all that you will need, Ernie is a fanatic about testing
his builds for a least a year before releasing any plans, and I know he has more than a couple of cob ovens to his credit !

Again depending on the skill sets that you bring to the job you could look at the "rocket type'' Bread oven from Aprovecho- To see that build go to You tube and enter
'Aprovecho Research Center' and Hunt for the Video Aprovevecho Rocket Bread Oven. This is a faster heating bread oven and can be used for small pizzas with about
the same amount of fuel as the Cob oven from E + E. This model might work better for people with different skills! Hope this helps you make up your mind, G'Luck !

For the Craft, as always questions / comments are solicited and Welcome! Think like Fire! think like a Gas, Don't be the Marshmallow ! PYRO - Logically Big AL !
 
allen lumley
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B Henderson : There are entire food cultures that have evolved around the bakers oven, in France Kids would drop of their Mothers prepared "pot pie'' pot-au-feu
on the way to school, picking it up on the way home, this worked because the internal temps of the oven had dropped down to the point that the dish wold slow cook
all day long !

Boston Baked Beans were a required or regimented dish of the Puritans/residents of old New England who were not allowed to light a fire on SUNDAY *until after
church, their hot meal came out of the bakers oven and was picked up after church on the way home !

As Ernie says With a properly fueled cob stove you can cook all day long, The Aprovecho oven will use a little less fuel and do its job a little faster,whether it makes better
bread I leave to the foodies, ether one of these will proof Bread dough for instance !

A third choice covered by Leslie Jackson in Ianto Evans ' "rocket mass heaters'' is the use of a stone slab, or a cooling rack, or a spider, on the Rocket Mass Heaters
55 gal barrel top with a simple inverted bowl, or even one made out of several layers of Aluminum foil shinny side down !

I was attempting to explain to John Dooley that within or outside of ones own skill set many different solutions are possible, Thank you for pointing out the part I missed !

*Heaven help the Young house wife / good woman who failed to bank the fire sufficiently in her hearths ashes, so there were still some glowing coals to allow her to rebuild
'the home fires', she would have to go to her neighbors to borrow some hot embers, and be exposed as a slattern ! Hope this helps You ! A. L.

For the Craft! As always, your comments and questions are solicited and be Welcome, think like fire, flow like a gas, don't be the Marshmallow ! PYRO - Logically Big AL !
 
B Henderson
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Allen: good points...however, here's my issue...I am not a baker with a need for an oven that I will fire at 2:00 AM, be ready for baking temps by 9:00 am when I leave for work and then pull dinner out of the oven at 6:00. I'm looking for an oven to substitute for the heat-spewing indoor electric oven that heats up my kitchen during the 9 month long period of summer we get here in FL.

I'm really looking at an oven that I can use on an 'often' basis (I don't bake every day), that heats up reasonably quickly (my charcoal grill takes ~1 hour to be cook ready...that would be good goal) for quick use but has the flexibility to take a large amount of heat when I get a wild hair and want to bake off some pizza, bread, cookies, meats, veggies, dry some herbs/fruits/veg on any given weekend when I have the time to keep an eye on a long firing. I am also in an urban(ish) environment with not a lot of room for wood storage, although I do have a fairly ready access to supply.

In my mind, a traditional wood oven/rocket hybrid could meet my needs. Maybe it's just my ignorance of the nuances of a wood oven...I am trying to avoid firing an oven, even a small one, for a couple of hours for a 1-2 hour bake and then waste the remaining 6 hours of stored heat. I don't know...maybe that will make me a better, more creative cook but I am basing my plan on what kind of a cook I am today, not the kind I might be down the road.
 
R Scott
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Small basic cob dome oven of proper geometry will heat up fast, an hour is possible (but two is easier), on not much more wood that a low-mass stove. Start the fire, then go make the dough and you all will be ready about the same time. The low-mass stoves need feeding and stoking during the baking process.

Yes, you are not using all the efficiency of the heat--but you are still more efficient than you were!
 
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