• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Wanting less meat now - grass-fed  RSS feed

 
Renate Howard
pollinator
Posts: 755
Location: zone 6b
9
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I've noticed this odd thing and was wondering if anyone else has noticed it as well - now that we have our 100% grass fed bull back from the butchers, I only want meat about once a week. I'm thinking maybe humans don't need that much meat but need certain nutrients in it that we aren't getting from CAFO meat, leaving us craving - get good quality meat and the cravings are satiated and the meat-hunger goes way down.

Has anyone else observed this?

I don't think it's anything wrong with the meat, it is delicious and I enjoy it when I eat it. But at this rate the 320 lbs in the freezer is going to last a very long time!
 
Leila Rich
steward
Posts: 3999
Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
88
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We don't have CAFOs. That's not to say our cattle are raised particularly well, just less badly
I've never eaten a lot of meat, so I'm not a great judge.
Also, when I went in with friends on half a beast, I took the 'secondary' cuts which I find waaay more delicious, but take a lot more time: no last-minute meat at chez Leila!
 
John Polk
steward
Posts: 8019
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
289
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
... but need certain nutrients in it that we aren't getting from CAFO meat, leaving us craving -


I think you've hit the nail on the head.

G. F. Heuser, a leading researcher in poultry feeding in the middle of the 20th century, makes reference to this.
As he states in "Feeding Poultry", with the trend in poultry feeding at the time, the poultry were getting primarily by-products of the human cereal industry, and most of those were raised on depleted soils. Many of the minerals were missing from the plant matter that was being fed to both the humans, and the livestock.

I don't believe that a 'balanced diet' can be achieved from plants and animals raised on deficient soils.
I believe that this probably has a direct bearing on the obesity trend in the U.S.
People are craving nutrients which are lacking in mass produced foods. They eat more, trying to satisfy those cravings.

 
Denis Huel
Posts: 92
4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I know when my family eats wild meat we definitely eat less. I believe this because it is nutritionally "denser" than store bought industrially raised meat.
 
R Scott
Posts: 3351
Location: Kansas Zone 6a
32
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
If you look at what people used to eat and what they did, even less than 100 years ago, you know there has to be something missing.

A big part of it is the nutrition deficient empty calories of modern diets IMO.

Grass-fed beef from GOOD grass makes a difference. I personally think the intact bull (vs. steer) makes a difference, too.

When we went to grass-fed, we gorged on it initially because there was a craving for something it had but then tapered down to less than we normally ate. Same for fruits and veggies, too.
 
wayne stephen
steward
Posts: 1793
Location: Western Kentucky-Climate Unpredictable Zone 6b
104
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Perhaps a part of this satiety has to do with avoiding the addictive nature of the S.A.D. . It is an established fact that Industrial food producers manipulate the effects of fat/sugar/salt on the brain leaving you wanting more when you should be full . Everyones metabolism is different . I believe when you settle into a dietary approach that matches your metabolic needs -paleo . vegan , mediterranean - that you will find satisfaction at the end of a normal sized meal. I can plow into a 16oz CAFO T-bone and still have to fill up on potatos and dessert. I can eat a 4oz Grass fed steak and a side dish of tomato and cuke slices and push the plate away afterwards. The denser meat is more satisfying to chew and has more real flavor that does not need amendments. So part of this satisfaction may be sensorial and not just tied to micronutrients.
 
Joseph Fields
Posts: 174
Location: Berea, Kentucky
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I agree, I raise my own small flock of grass feed only sheep, and it hits the spot.
 
Attractive, successful people love this tiny ad:
FT Position Available: Affiliate Manager Who Loves Permaculture & Homesteading
https://permies.com/t/69742/FT-Position-Affiliate-Manager-Loves
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!