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paul wheaton
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I wish to express my position.

I want more people here. Of many flavors.

I want people that have their own business plan living here doing their thing.

I want people that don't know what they want to do, so they become part of what I'm doing.

I want people that have excellent skills and will be paid to do stuff - and I will then try to leverage that into some sort of income.

I want somebody that wants to be the rocket mass heater person and will do the shippable cores. I feel like if there is a person that is willing to do that, we can get that person rolling with a good business.

I know we have been here just a few weeks, but I really want there to be 20 people here all moving all projects forward. Some are their own projects and some are my projects. And when we get together at the dinner table we swap info on what all is going on and figure out how to move forward.

I just want to express that I want more people here. Now.

So far we have had poor luck with people that have listened to only a handful of podcasts. And I want good luck. But there do get to be times where we just need to get more done.

I want this. And I want to win the lottery. And I want a lovely piece of pie.

 
fiona smith
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Good luck I hope it goes well this time!

(i'm in UK so I can't make it)
 
Rebecca Holman
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In all fairness, I did come and bring you TWO pies..I am happy to come bring you more..LOL

I hesitate to come out more often cause I don't want to be in the way..I am up to Podcast 63..

I must admit, I dream about coming to the land and making a stake in this great process and experiment..but my partner does not want to live such a life.
So unless I ditch him, after 20 years of breaking him in..my dream will be just that for a while longer.

 
Ken Peavey
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And I would love to be one of them!
Unfortunately I have commitments and stuff which leave me emulating rather than joining.
 
Julia Winter
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The pie I can help with, but not until later this month.

It's tough. Like many other people, I find what you are doing fascinating, but I've invested years of my life in becoming a pediatrician. While I know you have at least one little child (mr or ms jam-faced) on the farm, plus Kristie's kids, that's just not going to comprise a pediatric practice for me. My husband works via the internet, so he can live almost anywhere, but how many people are like that? My daughters love children's theater, a difficult passion to pursue in a rural setting.

If I hadn't been laid off in February, I'd be the sort of person who could buy a deep roots share, but I still haven't been able to register for the Permaculture Voices convention (not until I've worked a while, and I will FINALLY start working again, in a new state, in late September). I'm just praying that I'll be able to ask for the necessary time off at my new job.

You know, for so many people, Montana is like another planet--somewhere they've heard about, but have never seen. It's not a place you just casually pass through, at least not in this midwesterner's experience.

Hey, that suggests to me that it would behoove you to put out some more videos with recent footage of what's going on at Base Camp and the Laboratory. (As if you don't have enough to do!) Somehow video makes things seem a whole lot more real to many people. It might help in recruiting. I agree though, that you want to be careful about who you let in. Many of the people most looking for community are most lacking in themselves. I think I heard Jocelyn say once "it's cheaper than therapy!"

Which brings to mind that as far as podcasts go, I'm just about done hearing them all. By the time I've driven through Minnesota, South Dakota and Wyoming, I will have heard them all more than once, I'm guessing.
 
Danette Cross
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Location: St. Ignatius, Montana, zone 5b
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I was there. I am still in Montana, but not THERE. I am selling my house near the University in Missoula and we have bought a place up in St. Ignatius. So though I am still here, I am no longer there. I have more space, a 3/4 acre garden area we are building up with "hugel-lasagna-Back-to-eden-beds", 1.5 acre "sheep space" and 3 acres across the creek that will be growing forage, corn, wheat and flax (etc) and future location of "Beetopia: The land of the hive, and the home of the Bee".

40 miles in to Missoula isn't that far, but now Polson is closer! I still have a job in Missoula, so am there 5 days a week, and sometimes 6 when we need to come in for things we can't get up here. Like stuff at Axemen's!! But even though Missoula is my home town, and really an awesome place, it feels like a big city to me now! How crazy is that!?! I guess going from a town of 90,000 to one of 845 people might have something to do with it....

We did build 3 raised beds at the house in Missoula, reclaimed a lawn that hadn't be loved on for decades, and bricked a sweet patio area that was hard pan and rock. So we always try to improve where we are, or have been.

So I am still here, even though I am not there. Hammering in stakes to mark off where we want the greenhouse and filling our compost bins, just in a lot bigger space than the 1/4 acre we had in town. Makes 5 1/2 acres seem huge.

Build it and they will come. People that used to laugh at me for wanting to be more self sufficient aren't laughing anymore, they sense what's going on.

 
Adam Moore
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Hey Paul, Willy Wonka had the same problem. Fortunately he gained the favor of a race of bluish, plump, peace loving, short people who had high morals and loved to sing about them. I'm sure you will find your own group of Oompa Loompas, or Smurfs. Permaculture loving Smurfs would also work I suppose, you would just need more of them.
 
Rebecca Holman
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Adam Moore wrote:Hey Paul, Willy Wonka had the same problem. Fortunately he gained the favor of a race of bluish, plump, peace loving, short people who had high morals and loved to sing about them. I'm sure you will find your own group of Oompa Loompas, or Smurfs. Permaculture loving Smurfs would also work I suppose, you would just need more of them.


Paul's Oompa Loompa OOmpa Band.. hahaah..now that is funny. They do have green hair after all.
 
Danette Cross
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Maybe, butt oooo - look at those eyebrows!

But Paul is right. He is on a mission and needs people to jump in and get some things done.
 
Alex Love
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Forgive me if this has been addressed, but my concern with joining Paul's community is not the benevolent dictatorship aspect (with apologies to Churchill and credit to Plato, democracy is overrated), but in the lack of security. And I'm not even talking about how only Paul has any property rights. Assuming Paul is what geoff lawton would call an ethical angel, my question is: what happens in the event of Paul's death? Most people leave their property to their ungrateful children, who then promptly turn around and sell the property to the third party buyer with the most cash. I see it constantly as a probate attorney. The upshot in this case being that those who have given to and become dependent upon the land are up a creek without a paddle (to put it politely). I don't know whether Paul's child(ren) is/are ungrateful, but the vast majority of kids are. Plus, it might be nice to know that one could ensure that one's own ungrateful children could carry on on the land (assuming they weren't actually ungrateful and were equally committed to the project). I think that Paul will find that unless there is some provision made for these eventualities, and for giving people some sense of buy-in/ownership/security, the higher caliber recruits will sit it out (and I say that as someone who wakes up every day and ask himself how he can responsibly move toward a homesteading lifestyle).
 
Danette Cross
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Alex Love wrote:Forgive me if this has been addressed, but my concern with joining Paul's community is not the benevolent dictatorship aspect (with apologies to Churchill and credit to Plato, democracy is overrated), but in the lack of security. And I'm not even talking about how only Paul has any property rights. Assuming Paul is what Geoff Lawton would call an ethical angel, my question is: what happens in the event of Paul's death? Most people leave their property to their ungrateful children, who then promptly turn around and sell the property to the third party buyer with the most cash. I see it constantly as a probate attorney. The upshot in this case being that those who have given to and become dependent upon the land are up a creek without a paddle (to put it politely). I don't know whether Paul's child(ren) is/are ungrateful, but the vast majority of kids are. Plus, it might be nice to know that one could ensure that one's own ungrateful children could carry on on the land (assuming they weren't actually ungrateful and were equally committed to the project). I think that Paul will find that unless there is some provision made for these eventualities, and for giving people some sense of buy-in/ownership/security, the higher caliber recruits will sit it out (and I say that as someone who wakes up every day and ask himself how he can responsibly move toward a homesteading lifestyle).


I, personally would never move on to someone else's property either. But what I take away from this is that I share with him the desire to move myself and others who want to, forward towards more self sufficiency and responsibility to ourselves and our planet.

So though you may not actually, physically move to Paul's place, doesn't mean that you can't emmulate what he is doing and follow your own path in kind.
 
Adam Moore
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I would love to move to Paul's land. If I was only 20 years younger or 10 years older I could do it. Too many family responsibilities take priority over my dream right now in this stage of my life. I'm sure that's an excuse Paul hears way too much. Paul is a smart guy and he wants this experiment to be generational. I'm sure he has thought things through in case of his early demise. I'm really surprised though that more young people, who don't have the responsibilities, are not showing up in droves. This is an amazing opportunity Paul is offering. To trade hard work for knowledge and community is an amazing deal. I wonder if advertising for college aged interns would work?
 
paul wheaton
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I have a will. My kids get nothing.

I think a key component is: courage. Right now, the only people showing up and participating have courage. Later, this might be some sort of posh thing with all sorts of re-assurances and amenities. And then we will charge real money.

So you can pony up courage now, or money later.

 
Adam Moore
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Cowardly Lion: Courage! What makes a king out of a slave? Courage! What makes the flag on the mast to wave? Courage! What makes the elephant charge his tusk in the misty mist, or the dusky dusk? What makes the muskrat guard his musk? Courage! What makes the sphinx the seventh wonder? Courage! What makes the dawn come up like thunder? Courage! What makes the Hottentot so hot? What puts the "ape" in apricot? What have they got that I ain't got?
Dorothy, Scarecrow, Tin Woodsman: Courage!


 
Coralee Palmer
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I think a key component is: courage. Right now, the only people showing up and participating have courage. Later, this might be some sort of posh thing with all sorts of re-assurances and amenities. And then we will charge real money.


I can only share our experience with getting people to help and interested in Permaculture. Our plan is not necessarily designed to be a persons ultimate permaculture location; however, it could be if they choose. Our offer is posted on Permies.com at:

Our offer

We have the money and equipment to do all our projects. We just need labor. We have full hook ups (include internet) and do not charge for anything, but do not plan on having any permanent residences built. People must have an a 5th Wheel, travel trailer, Yurt or RV. When they have learned what they need, they take their home and move on or they can stay if they choose. There are a lot of livable trailers on Oregon Coast Craigslist in the $2000 - $4000 range.

Our results after two (2) years of trying are that we have only been able to attract 4 groups of permies. The only expense the permies have is their food and most of the permies are on food stamps or we grow it. We only expect an average of 2/hours of labor per day they are fully hooked up to our sewer, water, electric and internet.

I have come to the conclusion that people are not interested in the work it takes to get a Permaculture farm set up and get going. Even with
some sort of posh thing with all sorts of re-assurances and amenities
I do not believe the world will not beat a path to our door.

Of course, we do not have 18,690 registered users to draw from, but I think it will take a long time for us to get the ideas that Paul talk about up and running.

nextday@vol.com
 
Kenzie Greenwood
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Hey Paul,
I've been listening to some of your podcasts, though admittedly only a few so far, and I got the email you sent out.
My partner and I have been searching for land to start our own community, or an established community to become a part of.
He is a dry stone mason, and I'm a gardener and soil enthusiast, and we are a jack-and-Jill-of-all-trades pair, with a general comfort using tools of various kinds. We have great interest in natural building and primal/primitive skills. We are also both fairly decent cooks, and I know my way around various computer systems.
My questions are simply: do you have want/need for these skills? And, What kinds of stone are native to the Missoula area?
 
Adam Mackey Smith
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Alex Love, as a probate lawyer, perhaps you could offer some basic ideas of how someone like Paul might create a legal structure which could outlive him. A trust? A corporation? Are there others? How would you create a place secure enough that you might consider living there?

(Also, this is my first official post after lurking here for literally years. Thanks Paul and members for creating such a great resource.)
 
Jocelyn Campbell
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Kenzie Greenwood wrote:Hey Paul,
I've been listening to some of your podcasts, though admittedly only a few so far, and I got the email you sent out.
My partner and I have been searching for land to start our own community, or an established community to become a part of.
He is a dry stone mason, and I'm a gardener and soil enthusiast, and we are a jack-and-Jill-of-all-trades pair, with a general comfort using tools of various kinds. We have great interest in natural building and primal/primitive skills. We are also both fairly decent cooks, and I know my way around various computer systems.
My questions are simply: do you have want/need for these skills? And, What kinds of stone are native to the Missoula area?


Hi Kenzie - hm, do we ever have stones here at base camp! Here are a couple pics of what could be a quarry, if you ask me. My hand is large for a woman, and is reaching toward some of the rocks that are at the bottom of the first pic.

If you haven't already, see also the paid positions thread - though of course, people could be here and do their own thing/not be in a paid position - and food and drink at the project for those who are working for room and board.
20130824_111728.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20130824_111728.jpg]
base camp "quarry"
20130824_111823.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20130824_111823.jpg]
base camp rocks at base of "quarry"
 
Jocelyn Campbell
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Kenzie Greenwood wrote:Hey Paul,
My questions are simply: do you have want/need for these skills?


I realize that I did not answer this question directly - though I think the paid positions link, etc., will help quite a bit. Yes, I think Paul would say we could use your skills and in general, we can use jack- and jills-of-all-trades. And yet there are some issues and caveats involved, including:
--listening to most or all of the podcasts - Paul really, really, wants this for anyone coming out
--trial periods - currently, an option to try things out might be the super weeks - pm or e-mail me if you're interested
--distance/travel issues - it can be expensive for some to travel here. We are not providing travel costs to anyone interested in being a part of the project here (paid or otherwise), nor are we bartering or trading for this ahead of time (sorry to have to point that out, though it's been asked, so I wanted to clarify)
--plan b - money or resources to exit, which we've been calling a parachute package. Because, as Paul wrote in the do we get along thread:

I like to think that everybody that comes to the land will have a parachute and then things will be so awesome that they will stay forever - thus never using their parachute. But my track record says that that thought is too optimistic.


The last one might be stating the obvious again, though we really want to be sure folks aren't stuck here for lack of a parachute.

For the super week starting Tuesday, 8/27, we have a handful of people coming out. Some of these might decide to stay full time - at least one of them wants to consider that. We have two coming to live full time in October, and probably one coming to live full time in September. In winter months, we could be limited by the housing here, until we build more; and until the project generates more income, we are limited on the number of paid positions (says the accountant ) we can offer.

I'm a detail and categories and calendar dates person - occupational hazard - and listing off caveats and boundaries like that can sound a bit like a wet blanket <insert apologetic smile here>. The thing is, it's still fairly loosey-goosey on who would/could/should be here and in what capacity.

So....did that help answer the question at all?
 
Josh Shwa
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I would be interested in this. I am purchasing land in South America. I will be working on that a lot. When I am back home though I would love to be a part of an important project like this.

Where can I find these podcasts?
 
Jocelyn Campbell
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Josh Shwa wrote:Where can I find these podcasts?


If you use iTunes, or another podcast app, search for Homesteading and Permaculture by Paul Wheaton, and your app will take care of it for you. Though I think only the most recent podcasts are available through some of those apps.

Alternatively, there are two places to download the podcasts:
http://www.scubbly.com/store/permaculture/ - Paul's scubbly store where big gobs of podcasts can be downloaded for an average of $4.50
http://www.richsoil.com/permaculture/ - Paul's podcast blog.

For summaries and discussions, see: http://www.permies.com/forums/f-88/podcast.
 
paul wheaton
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I spent a fair bit of time visiting with Jocelyn about this yesterday. And then again with Jesse and Jocelyn.

We are currently hiring about three people to come and help with construction. And we have hired a kitchen commander.

I thought we would set the bar high and there would be a dozen people here full time by now. Clearly the bar was too high.

So for many things, the bar will stay just as high as it is now, but we are lowering the bar for the next two months on the requirement for having listened to a majority of the podcasts. Partly because some people are just not podcast listening people - but have enough experience with videos and forums to compensate. Partly because we think that this could be an avenue to infect more brains with more stuff. And the construction people have probably never heard of permaculture.

I guess my primary concern is people coming out that have heard just enough about permaculture to say "you're doing it wrong." So I've already talked to Tim and Jocelyn about this and the response will be "if you have ideas about a different way, then you need to present those at the table at the next meal. In the meantime, we are going to continue doing it this way."

Part of the concern was that if we have people here that are not familiar with my stuff, they will slow the group down rather than speed the group up. But we are now coming up with strategies to mitigate that.

Another thing is that when Jesse was here on this more recent visit, he says it was well worth the trip and that he learned a lot. At the same time, I think that if there were 2 jesses and 10 noobs, then the exchange of information would have been greater, plus the projects would have moved forward faster and Jesse would have been able to have more experiences and more knowledge.


 
paul wheaton
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I feel like right now is a really good time for people to come who have not listened to podcasts. I would like to think that in the future our position will be "we have lots of people here now, so we are freaky picky."

People that we are now seeking:

1) pod people. They have listened to at least half the podcasts so they know what is going on and why. Having these people here will do a lot to help with conveying knowledge to others.

2) minions. People that are not very familiar with what we are doing here, but are willing to throw their shoulder in and learn while they are here.


People that we don't want:

A) people that will tell us that we are doing it wrong when they have not read the articles or forums; have not listened to the podcasts; have not watched the videos. These people impede the whole group.

B) people that want a tour

C) people that want to be here for just one day (the costs of ramp time and feeding you do not outweigh your contribution)

------

The longer a person is willing to be here the better. Because then those people can be relied on more and more. And if we have people coming for just a weekend, a long term person can help them personally come up to speed.

I think the food here has been quite good and all organic. Now that we have a kitchen commander, I think the quality will be even higher.

For some of the pod people that have put a lot of time in here and really moved us forward, we have given deep discounts to workshops. I could see doing something similar for the right kinds of minions.

I have mentioned it in this forum in the past: if somebody comes here and puts in a lot for 18 months, I can see expressing my gratitude with something that smells like a deep roots package.

As mentioned in a previous podcast: I think that there will be a lot of business opportunities evolving here as the months pass. And there will be opportunities for real work, or for real businesses.




 
Jocelyn Campbell
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Key points and further links on how to make this work are in the new how to volunteer, visit, or apply for a paid position thread.
 
Annie Sires
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I would guess that more information to the general public would help. Here I am a "certified Master Gardener" and yet I hear over and over from the County Extension that IPM along with it's pesticides and nice neat rows of plants spaced 3 feet apart are the way to grow things.

I would love it if we could sponsor a class at a state or national Master gardeners meeting on Permaculture. Heck, just teaching a class on the east coast so I don't have to go to Missoula (I'm a soon to be Paramedic in Maryland) here on Rocket stoves and permaculture would be AMAZING.

I think that if more people knew what you could do and how and how to do it in small spaces... well that would get you those volunteers, possibly. Also, what about contacting various alternative colleges?

People want to know "What's In It For Me" and until you address WIIFM for the masses, you won't get more than the fringe (yes, I am including myself in the fringe, surrounded that I am with 200 year old tobacco and beef farms and massive conventional farming.

Heck, if I could get you to show the Amish the benefit of this, they would jump on it like hot-cakes. Granted, you won't get many volunteers from among them, but they might show it to enough people to spread the word.

I don't know, throwing stuff out there and see what sticks.
 
Jocelyn Campbell
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Annie Sires wrote:I would guess that more information to the general public would help. Here I am a "certified Master Gardener" and yet I hear over and over from the County Extension that IPM along with it's pesticides and nice neat rows of plants spaced 3 feet apart are the way to grow things.

I would love it if we could sponsor a class at a state or national Master gardeners meeting on Permaculture. Heck, just teaching a class on the east coast so I don't have to go to Missoula (I'm a soon to be Paramedic in Maryland) here on Rocket stoves and permaculture would be AMAZING.

I think that if more people knew what you could do and how and how to do it in small spaces... well that would get you those volunteers, possibly. Also, what about contacting various alternative colleges?

People want to know "What's In It For Me" and until you address WIIFM for the masses, you won't get more than the fringe (yes, I am including myself in the fringe, surrounded that I am with 200 year old tobacco and beef farms and massive conventional farming.

Heck, if I could get you to show the Amish the benefit of this, they would jump on it like hot-cakes. Granted, you won't get many volunteers from among them, but they might show it to enough people to spread the word.

I don't know, throwing stuff out there and see what sticks.


Ernie and Erica have taught RMH workshops on the east coast. I bet they could be convinced to do so again.

Lot of folks have been commenting that Paul's recently published keynote from the S. California Permaculture Convergence gives an excellent overview of permaculture. Maybe it could be shown in a class, or to a group.



We're currently (today even) trying to work with people who don't know much about Paul's stuff. Frankly, it is time consuming. So while we have reached out a little beyond permies, and are opening up to people who haven't listened to very many podcasts, we are just doing that in small steps for now. Even locals from alternative colleges would mean lots of ramping up time because Paul's version of permaculture is rather unique.
 
Elizabeth Criscuolo
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Where are you located? My boyfriend and I are looking for an intentional community where we can simply tend the land and work/live outside in nature with like minded intelligent people. We're coming from the Atlanta, ga area and are pretty much willing to relocate anywhere. We are looking to do this ASAP. We are in a good position to move right now. I am a vet tech and I've worked with all types of animals for years. That is my passion. He is an artist. He makes money as a graphic designer but his personal art is amazing. Oil, acrylic, and charcoal/pencil are his best mediums. We want to learn to be self sufficient. To live in harmony with the earth Instead of leeching off of it. Please let me know if this is what you are looking for and a bit more ab yourself and your property. Thanks! Elizabeth
 
Jocelyn Campbell
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Elizabeth Criscuolo wrote:Where are you located? My boyfriend and I are looking for an intentional community where we can simply tend the land and work/live outside in nature with like minded intelligent people. We're coming from the Atlanta, ga area and are pretty much willing to relocate anywhere. We are looking to do this ASAP. We are in a good position to move right now. I am a vet tech and I've worked with all types of animals for years. That is my passion. He is an artist. He makes money as a graphic designer but his personal art is amazing. Oil, acrylic, and charcoal/pencil are his best mediums. We want to learn to be self sufficient. To live in harmony with the earth Instead of leeching off of it. Please let me know if this is what you are looking for and a bit more ab yourself and your property. Thanks! Elizabeth


Hi Elizabeth, we are near Missoula, MT. Did you see the following post just a little further up?

Jocelyn Campbell wrote:Key points and further links on how to make this work are in the new how to volunteer, visit, or apply for a paid position thread.


If you're still interested after following that link and reading through things, then I'm the contact.
 
Valerie Acquard
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After reading some of these (I didn't make it through everything) I have a few things to say.

As a youngish person, with no kids, my own tiny mobile house and chicken coop, no land (we are renting).
I honestly weep that I can't just join Paul, or anyone else making the same kind of offer.
I just can't bring my self to leave this town, because I'm madly in love with it.
I love Minnesota, like I've never loved a place before in my life.
I work at an organic diner that specializes in locally grown food, and is currently putting in a hugelkultur swalle in the back parking lot. (We call it unpaving paradise) How could I walk away from this job?
My pay is excellent. And My bosses fully support and back my idea of going full time farmer, eventually.
And that eventual goal has to include children.
The goal is to create a self sustaining permaculture farm that will support a foster home full of children.
Having survived my childhood. I really want to be able to help others out of their own child-"hoods".

BUT!
I would LOVE:
The community
The knowledge
The experience

And would I be acceptable?
I have some very strong political views (if anarchy can be called a political view)
I want to care for foster kids.
For these two reasons I feel like I would never be accepted in any community/co-op house/commune/anything.
My dream will have to be carried on my husband and I's own shoulders.
I really truly wish I could be some of the people you need.
 
paul wheaton
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Rufus,

Your post contained stuff which was borderline enough that the staff needed to delete it. But I think you ask a good question.

Yes! I think you are correct. When we have enough pod people here full time then we can in more people that are not pod people. The noobs can then ask questions of the pod people.

As is, for the next two months we are taking in more people whether they are pod people or not.

 
Jocelyn Campbell
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Valerie, your post is poetic - I'm glad you've found a town that you are in love with. I imagine there could be a place for foster children in the right community, and with the right foster parents.
 
R Scott
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Location: Kansas Zone 6a
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Jocelyn Campbell wrote:I imagine there could be a place for foster children in the right community, and with the right foster parents.


I wish that were true, Jocelyn. As a former foster parent I can say the system here would probably not allow foster kids into a community, and unequivocally say that if I had a community there would be NO WAY would I let foster kids into my community. Paul though pot was a vector, he has seen nothing like the department of "for the children."

Valerie, I love your post and attitude. Don't take my cynicism personal. I have been burned by the system and am convinced it is not repairable. But many of the kids still are so I am not giving up on doing good, I just won't do it through the system anymore.
 
Jennifer McMann
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These are my personal opinions, please take them for what you will.

I think this statement condtradicts itself:

A) people that will tell us that we are doing it wrong when they have not read the articles or forums; have not listened to the podcasts; have not watched the videos. These people impede the whole group.


Reading up on a topic gives you just enough confidence to think you understand it but not the required experience to actually know what you're talking about. It's the pefect storm of "you're doing it wrong" with also not being able to help at all. I don't think you need people who hve read articles and forums, you need people who have their hearts in the right place. You need excited, driven people who want to make a positive impact in this world, and I don't think they need to know what Permaculture is ahead of time. I think that if you portray it as a learning experience, almost a live-in PDC, you'll get just the people you want. "Hey, everyone! Who wants to learn about a way to live closer to nature in a sustainable way that actually heals the land too? It's called Permaculture and if you want to learn about it come to my farm!"

My second point is about the podcasts. Frankly, they're below average. They're not engaging, they're typically not organized, and the worst part is they're usually not informative. To use a specific example, the recent podcast about residual income streams was about 30% interesting and informative. That 30% is worth listening to and I did learn something. Unfortunately the rest of the podcast was so saturated with whining and complaints it was very off-putting. Jocelyn even commented that "this is therapy for him" during some complaints. If Paul wants to use podcasts to educate people then he needs to eliminate this theraputic but non productive whining and condense the information. If Paul wants to continue to use pocasts to talk about personal feelings then that's fine, it's his podcast and he can and should do whatever he wants with them. Until then the value of listening to the podcasts should be rethought.
 
Mike Leo
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I think I understand what you mean about a shippable RMH core, but aside from the fact that there isn't someone offering to do that now and it's a niche that needs filling is there some other problem preventing this from moving forward?

I feel like that should be something relatively easy to troubleshoot especially if there is someone actually fabricating the cores and just unwilling to ship them.

Is this an issue with production, distribution, participation or all of the above?
 
Tom OHern
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Jennifer McMann wrote:My second point is about the podcasts. Frankly, they're below average. They're not engaging, they're typically not organized, and the worst part is they're usually not informative. To use a specific example, the recent podcast about residual income streams was about 30% interesting and informative. That 30% is worth listening to and I did learn something. Unfortunately the rest of the podcast was so saturated with whining and complaints it was very off-putting. Jocelyn even commented that "this is therapy for him" during some complaints. If Paul wants to use podcasts to educate people then he needs to eliminate this theraputic but non productive whining and condense the information. If Paul wants to continue to use pocasts to talk about personal feelings then that's fine, it's his podcast and he can and should do whatever he wants with them. Until then the value of listening to the podcasts should be rethought.


I thought seriously about coming out to join the group at the farm. I've listened to all the podcasts. I enjoy the podcasts, even the parts where I am driving in my car talking back to the Paul in my stereo telling him to get to the point and stop complaining about everything. But then I thought about trying to get my wife to listen to the podcasts so that she would be ready to go out too, and I just couldn't do it. I also, avoid sending the podcast out to others because they are not focused enough. I don't mind the lack of editing, the bad sound quality, or the complaints about the departments of making you sad. I will continue to listen to every podcast and I hope paul keeps making more of them. But I agree that because they become "therapy", I do not suggest to others that they should start listening. I think they are a great tool for talking to people already in the Empire, but they are a bad tool for bringing more people into the Empire.
 
Jay Vinekeeper
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Jennifer McMann wrote:These are my personal opinions, please take them for what you will.


Thoughtful and insightful criticism and feedback ... brave ... you should be a valuable member of any serious endeavor, community or business. I bet you could help PW improve many elements in the p-casts. Hope you are taken up on the task.

Stay strong and truthful. Keep the feedback coming.

be well

jv
 
Rufus Laggren
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> post deleted...

Paul

I appreciate your note. Thanks.



Rufus
 
Rufus Laggren
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Jennifer

I tend to agree sorta about the podcasts, but....

But I'll point out that this endeavor of Paul's is a big deal with lots on the table and work enough for 10 times as many people 25/7 (no typo). That likely means: 1) Paul himself probably needs 48 hour days and has to let a lot of stuff go that he would really like to get on top of. 2) The wagon train needs to roll on the wheels it has _now_ (lots of podcasts being one of them). 3) You mentioned "learning experience" and boy oh boy soooo right! For _everybody_. I bet there's lots of "next time we'll do it..." going on around the dinner table... And looks like you might have stepped up and become a teacher for the moment. <g>

Too much to do implies not enough time to teach and explain (over and over again). I think that's one of Paul's hopes re. podcasts - a bit of on-ramp leading to fewer lane changes on the highway. In that light the 'casts may actually be quite valuable just the way they are - a short intro into the mind of the Big Guy. That might help a lot of people decide their own feelings about joining the effort right now - saving time and "misunderstanding" later. Until there's a clearly better way, the 'casts as-are may actually serve pretty well.

Besides: No living thing in this world looks pretty while it's climbing out of the mud to the next level. The deal is to keep scrambling moving and in the right direction. The Empire can hose off and straighten it's tie when it's got the beach head secured.

Rufus
 
Hey, sticks and stones baby. And maybe a wee mention of my stuff:
Composting Chickens Comic (e)Book - The Ulitmate Guide to Compsting with Chickens - Digital Download
https://permies.com/t/66064/digital-market/digital-market/Composting-Chickens-Comic-Book-Ulitmate
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