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What is it.... the game! Post unknown objects to ID... and to stump others!

 
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We think there's cutters, or partitions, or something inside (if it doesn't store onions or garlic), probably hooked to the underside of the lid.

 
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It’s 2:00am here, so one last post before changing shifts to yo’all over there.

Update:

1. Nothing to do with a coconut or fruit whatsoever, but something to do with a bar and drinks. Yes, those segments are functional in its use.
2. I like the Chris Kott’s ‘structural’ comment but, no, not structural from a strength viewpoint.
3. The nipple does protrude but is a solid part of the ‘lid’ – it doesn’t move independently.
4. It’s not insulated – painted metal, probably aluminium … er … I’ll translate that to American, it’s probably aluminum.
5. It doesn’t get heated, quite the opposite.
6. The inside of the ‘lid’ is shown in photo 3 of 3. What you see is what you get, nothing hidden … except for it actual function of course!
7. No cutters or partitions inside
8. Onion or garlic storage? My, how desperate people are becoming!
 
Pearl Sutton
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#3 is the inside of the lid?! I thought it was the inside bottom of the jar  thing. Unless the jar thing HAS no bottom... ooooh... thinking on it while I clean out the chicken coop...
 
Pearl Sutton
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So if the "lid" is actually the bottom, and the bottom is actually open... Then we have a cup, that has a few small holes in the bottom, and hooks to something that maybe spins...? and is part of a bar. I am the cook at parties, I tell the bartenders what I want and they magically make it happen, just like they tell me what food they ant and I magically make it happen... Not up on bar stuff.
 
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Something about it reminds me of ice and ice cream.

Which makes me think of a butter churn.

 
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it is a food cover with holes on the 'black nipple' so that it air flows!
 
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Do you place it over a cup so the "nipple" thing with the holes is towards the cup, put ice in it and pour a mixed drink through it into the cup so the drink gets chilled, but there's no ice in the final drink? Sort of like a strainer? I with something like absinthe you do something similar with ice, and a sugar cube.

No idea what it would be called though.

Or does it somehow crush ice?

Or is it part of one of those cool old cigarette holders that fan them out when you lift the top off?

No idea, haha.
 
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light fixture/shade??
 
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1. Nothing to do with a coconut or fruit whatsoever, but something to do with a bar and drinks. Yes, those segments are functional in its use.



I spent some time browsing 'bar supplies' and didn't find anything likely.  There are quite odd tools of the trade there though...'salt rimmers' and 'jiggers' and 'muddlers'.

I'm just not seeing how the segments can be useful other than to measure something?  to grip in order to twist off a lidded something placed in the canister?




 
F Agricola
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Some more clarifications:

1. The black thing with the nipple and segments is the TOP, the other end (the BOTTOM) is open. What you can see in the BOTTOM view is the inside of the black top.
2. The top does NOT spin, and the whole thing is NOT part of a bar … though it could sit on one.
3. Nothing to do with ice-cream, making butter or making ice – either the frozen stuff or the illegal stuff! It is involved with the cold though.
4. Not a food cover of any type either.
5. Nothing to do with cigarettes, cigars, or smoking of any kind – legal or illegal!
6. Light fixture or shade – nope
7. Bar supplies? No exactly, more for domestic use – consider the swinging 60’s and 70’s = lots of specialised, somewhat novelty party/kitchen things.


Jeffrey Carlson: RE: ‘Do you place it over a cup so the "nipple" thing with the holes is towards the cup, put ice in it and pour a mixed drink through it into the cup so the drink gets chilled, but there's no ice in the final drink? Sort of like a strainer? I with something like absinthe you do something similar with ice, and a sugar cube.

Close, but no.
 
bernetta putnam
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desert cover, or a mold?
the top ridges mark out where the slices are to be cut?
 
F Agricola
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bernetta putnam wrote:desert cover, or a mold?
the top ridges mark out where the slices are to be cut?



Sorry, no.

 
Judith Browning
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7. Bar supplies? Not exactly, more for domestic use – consider the swinging 60’s and 70’s = lots of specialised, somewhat novelty party/kitchen things.



I had an aunt who was having cocktail parties in the 60's and 70's...she probably had one as she was very into gadgets and 'modern' things.  Maybe I'll ask her daughter and see if she recognizes it.



 
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OK, I went back and read all of the clues...

wild guess...a cover for dry ice for 'atmosphere' at a party?
 
F Agricola
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Judith Browning wrote:

OK, I went back and read all of the clues...

wild guess...a cover for dry ice for 'atmosphere' at a party?



Quite close, along the lines of cold but, no.

Perhaps ask a relative? (Sounds like a game show option!)

 
Ben Gorski
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it's a wood-splitting jig!
 
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Is it an ice reservoir so you can cool a drink without watering it down?
 
F Agricola
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RE: '... Wood Splitting Jig'

No -


RE: '... Ice Reservoir ...'

It has something to do with cold, drinking glasses, and it is a reservoir to hold something.


 
Pearl Sutton
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Wine bottle chiller?
 
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Is it to make frosty glasses?

Like this but not exactly?

https://www.wikihow.com/Chill-a-Martini-Glass
 
Judith Browning
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It has something to do with cold, drinking glasses, and it is a reservoir to hold something.


And the divisions on the 'lid' serve a purpose?

 
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The divisions on the lid look like structural ridges to me, adding rigidity

-CK
 
Pearl Sutton
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Judith Browning wrote: And the divisions on the 'lid' serve a purpose?


Chris Kott wrote:The divisions on the lid look like structural ridges to me, adding rigidity  



F said earlier they are functional, more than just structure, re your previous comment to that effect.

I like the Chris Kott’s ‘structural’ comment but, no, not structural from a strength viewpoint.  

 

I think we need to go find a bunch of party types from the 60s and 70s and interrogate them :D
I'm not ready to give up yet, but have no good ideas at all
 
Chris Kott
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Oh wait, is it some kind of jello mould?

-CK
 
Alex Riddles
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It looks to me like maybe some variation on  a cocktail shaker.  What is the approximate volume of it?
 
F Agricola
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Anne Miller wrote:Is it to make frosty glasses?

Like this but not exactly?

https://www.wikihow.com/Chill-a-Martini-Glass



SNAP, WE HAVE A WINNER!

Glass-Chiller_2-of-2.jpg
[Thumbnail for Glass-Chiller_2-of-2.jpg]
Glass-Chiller_1-of-2.jpg
[Thumbnail for Glass-Chiller_1-of-2.jpg]
 
Pearl Sutton
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An apple for Anne!! WHOO!!
That was a hard one!!!
Good game F Agricola!!!
 
Anne Miller
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Judith Browning wrote:

OK, I went back and read all of the clues...

wild guess...a cover for dry ice for 'atmosphere' at a party?



This is what gave me the idea, so Judith gets an apple!
 
Judith Browning
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Anne Miller wrote:

Judith Browning wrote:

OK, I went back and read all of the clues...

wild guess...a cover for dry ice for 'atmosphere' at a party?



This is what gave me the idea, so Judith gets an apple!



thank you Anne!

I'm really glad this one is over

and thank you F Agricola for all of your patience with 'clues', etc...it's been fun!
 
Pearl Sutton
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Reading during breakfast today, and found this picture. WITHOUT looking it up,can anyone identify it? No cheating, y'all!!! :D
I was fascinated. Hadn't thought about it before....

 
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Well ;  First off Happy Holiday's to all !

It is a ratcheting lift.   I'm guessing  for raising a horse .... ?
 
Pearl Sutton
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Close! Closer than I got till I read about it! :)
 
thomas rubino
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Maybe an Ox or a bull ?? Those sure look like belly straps.  No doubt its a lift but for what...
 
Pearl Sutton
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Apple for you, sir!!
It's to sling oxen so they can be shoed. You don't have to pick them up off the ground, but they can't lift one foot and balance like a horse does, they fall over. So you sling them up, and can lift feet one at a time to shoe them. Oven have split hooves so they get two shoes per foot.
Stuff I learn while I eat breakfast...

I was trying to figure out what the difference is between oxen and cows. None, really. Any cattle that has been taught to work is called an ox, generally the bigger breeds are used, but any can be, generally castrated males are used, but any can be. Saw a picture of a pair of milking oxen. Interesting!!
 
thomas rubino
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Hi Pearl;  
Thanks for finding a new object. And thanks for my shiny apple!  I have been looking for new objects as well but haven't come up with one yet.
Milking oxen ... who knew !

Happy Holidays to you and Mom !
 
Pearl Sutton
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Oxen Fueled the Westward Migration Picture right at the top, milking oxen!

That was in my email,I have been wondering about the difference between oxen and cows, and have asked several people. It was a fun little rabbithole for t he morning!

I want zebu, after reading all of this :D I looked at my lightweight little trailer that hitches to my truck, would be easy to make an oxen hitch that lets them pull anything with a ball hitch...

A lovely holiday season to you, your lady and all of yours too! :)
 
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Pearl Sutton wrote:Reading during breakfast today, and found this picture. WITHOUT looking it up,can anyone identify it? No cheating, y'all!!! :D
I was fascinated. Hadn't thought about it before....



Its a lift for shoing oxen, or clipping cows' hooves. If you use oxen for draft, they need shoes, just like horses do, and cows that don't walk on stoney ground fairly often need pedicures every couple of years. The problem is, cattle can't stand on 3 feet for any length of time, so you put them in a frame like that, tie their halter tothat front bar, use the belly bands to get the weight off their feei, ant then tie down the foot being worked on (and the other 3, if they're kick-y) and go to it.

EDIT I really have to start going all the way to the bottom of these before posting....
 
Daniel Schneider
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Pearl Sutton wrote:Oxen Fueled the Westward Migration Picture right at the top, milking oxen!

That was in my email,I have been wondering about the difference between oxen and cows, and have asked several people. It was a fun little rabbithole for t he morning!

I want zebu, after reading all of this :D I looked at my lightweight little trailer that hitches to my truck, would be easy to make an oxen hitch that lets them pull anything with a ball hitch...

A lovely holiday season to you, your lady and all of yours too! :)



Hej Pearl!

I looked at the article you linked to, and I think you may have misunderstood the caption: 'milking shorthorn' is the name of the breed. Looking at the pictures, as far as I can see, those are all boys. I can't speak for the rest of th US, but in New England ( and old England, as well, from what I've read), oxen are *always*  castrated bulls which have attained their full growth (before castration they're bull calves, after castration, but before they're fully grown , they're steers). You can train cows to pull, but they're still called cows, not oxen.
 
Pearl Sutton
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Daniel Schneider wrote: Hey Pearl!

I looked at the article you linked to, and I think you may have misunderstood the caption: 'milking shorthorn' is the name of the breed. Looking at the pictures, as far as I can see, those are all boys. I can't speak for the rest of the US, but in New England ( and old England, as well, from what I've read), oxen are *always*  castrated bulls which have attained their full growth (before castration they're bull calves, after castration, but before they're fully grown , they're steers). You can train cows to pull, but they're still called cows, not oxen.


Thank you! I read that they use females, including milking females for draft animals sometimes (although it lowers the milk production) I assumed those were multipurpose girls. Thank you for clarifying. I admit, I did not look close to see gender. Cool!
I like learning stuff!
 
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saw this at the flea market today

 

the circle is a loosely latched lid about 1' in diameter.
 
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