• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Pistachio, egg shells, etc.  RSS feed

 
Bryan John
Posts: 32
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Anyone put pistachio shells in their compost? Any use for them? Also, i've read that egg shells aren't too useful there, but better around plants to keep critters from getting to them. Lastly, I can't seem to get my compost too hot. Any tricks to getting it hotter?
 
John Polk
steward
Posts: 8019
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
287
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
If it is a part of something that once lived, it will decompose.

The secret to getting it hot is to try to keep your C:N ratio near 30:1.
Too much N, and it just rots.
Too much C, and it sits there like a clump of coal.

The microbes that are breaking it down need both; C = calories (energy), while N= protein.
Think of sitting at the dinner table with a 10 pound bowl of pasta. It would take all day to consume it.
Pour a pound of good spaghetti sauce over it, and you have a meal.

 
James Slaughter
Posts: 94
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Burn them, along with any other woody type material (coconut shells, pips, tree prunings, etc) and bones. Use the ashes (potassium and calcium, alternative to lime, etc) sprinkled around garden beds, especially fruit trees.
 
Bryan John
Posts: 32
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks. What about things like avocado peels?
 
John Polk
steward
Posts: 8019
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
287
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Any part of anything that once lived will decompose.

The harder parts (peels, beaks, hooves, etc.) will take longer to decompose than the softer parts (flesh, offal, etc.)
If the harder parts are ground/chopped finer, it will speed up their decomposition.

Human hair is the same as chicken feathers, ie 15% Nitrogen. 100 pounds of hair contains 15 pounds Nitrogen.

 
David Hartley
Posts: 258
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Pistachio shells have been composted or used as fire tinder. Avacado peels are composted; but take a zillion years (give or take a year) to break down. The shells of hardboiled eggs and "hen stopped going broody midway" eggs are composted. The majority of eggshells are stored in papaer grocery bags, to be later ground down by an old oster blender, for soil amendment.
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!