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Japanese Blueberry Tree

 
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Hi all,

Does anyone have experience growing Japanese Blueberry Tree?

I found this http://www.worldofblueberry.com/japanese-blueberry-tree-all-you-need-to-know/, and it made me very curious..


Thanks in advance
 
steward
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Location: Zones 2-4 Wyoming and 4-5 Colorado
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hugelkultur forest garden fungi books bee greening the desert
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Wow, "These trees mature to a height ranging anywhere between 30 to 50 feet and spread equally to the height, as wide as forty to fifty feet."
Looks interesting Bispo.
I probably couldn't get them to live up here in the high country, wrong zone.
 
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If you notice, the article doesn't talk about its edibility and they show a photo of a blueberry plant, rather than this tree. This tree is for ornament not for some blueberry edible use. If you want blueberry tree 30' or so, grow one of the tree species of juneberries that are out there, they could be more realistically called a blueberry tree than this thing.
 
Miles Flansburg
steward
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Good call Lance .
 
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OSU is trying the grafting of blueberries onto sparkleberries, the latter of which isn't edible but in the same family (?):

http://oregonstate.edu/dept/NWREC/programs/berry-crops/grafted-blueberry-trial
 
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J.D. Ray wrote:OSU is trying the grafting of blueberries onto sparkleberries, the latter of which isn't edible but in the same family (?):

http://oregonstate.edu/dept/NWREC/programs/berry-crops/grafted-blueberry-trial


Well, good as an ornamental but harder to harvest.  I think shrub types are fine.  I guess a mechanized (using saskatoon harvesters) monoculture with deer trouble, or a silvopasture, might benefit by getting the leaves and fruit more out of reach, but usually the main pests are rodents gnawing winter bark and birds stealing berries, which will not be stopped by this at all.

Does silvopasture even work for acidophyllic plants?  Won't the manure bring the soil closer to neutral pH?

Same genus, actually.  I grew up in sparkleberry country and they are in fact "edible" (but better for wildlife: deer, certain butterflies, birds), just not very eatable.  We called them "farkleberries" because they make you fart.  Boys use them for practical jokes, not flavor.
 
Something must be done about this. Let's start by reading this tiny ad:
Heat your home with the twigs that naturally fall of the trees in your yard
http://woodheat.net
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