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Anyone ever cooked a boston pork roast with the skin on?  RSS feed

 
Kevin MacBearach
Posts: 213
Location: Beavercreek, Oregon
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I butchered the pig myself and purposely left the skin on for the "crackling". Never cooked one before and I just bought a regular stainless steel roasting pan. I guess I could just look on youtube but any advice here would be helpful.
 
Kevin MacBearach
Posts: 213
Location: Beavercreek, Oregon
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Also, I have some side ends of the boston butt that I'm not sure of what to do with. Maybe slow cook in a crock pot?
 
Adam Klaus
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gardener
Posts: 946
Location: 6200' westen slope of colorado, zone 6
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I have cooked pork roasts that still have the skin on. It works great, no problem.

I like to sear the entire outside of the roast in a hot cast iron, and then put it into a roasing pan with a little liquid in the bottom to slow cook. Searing it seals in the juices, and putting a little liquid in the roasting pan keeps the drippings from scorching in the oven.

Cooking the smaller trimmings in a crock pot will work great- taco time!

Enjoy your pork!
 
John Elliott
pollinator
Posts: 2392
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Carnitas!

This is the classic Mexican recipe for what to do with a big piece of fatty pork that has skin and bones with it. Put your spice marinade on (salt, pepper, chili powder, cumin, coriander, etc) and let it sit for a while. Get your frying pan good and hot (on an electric one, I set it at 250F) and add the pork. There are two objectives to this first step in the cooking process: sear the outside of the meat, and render most of the fat off of the pieces. This may take 45 minutes to an hour, turning the pieces every 10 minutes or so. Next, transfer the pieces to a baking dish and add chicken or vegetable stock until the dish is at least half full. Bake it in a slow oven (~300-325F) for 2 or 3 hours, until the meat falls apart when tested with a fork. You don't want it to dry out completely during the baking process, so this may require the addition of more stock during the process.
 
Leila Rich
steward
Posts: 3999
Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
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I've never dry-roasted butt.
In my experience, it is generally best with slow, wet cooking: pot roast, barbeque etc.
If you leave the skin on with these kind of cooking methods, it's nigh-on impossible to get it crisp at the end,
it just goes sticky. It's still really yummy though!
In restaurants, we'd take the skin off before cooking the meat, score it, salt it, and roast it separately.
Bit of a fiddle for home cooking...
 
Ken Peavey
steward
Posts: 2524
Location: FL
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I use boston butts every now and then, lots of meat in there, plenty to be done.

Roasting whole with the skin on retains moisture. Under the skin is a layer of fat. This will melt down if slow roasted, smothering the roast with flavor and making the fat easy to eat. The skin will be tougher than a bag of hammers. I'm sure one could eat it, but I don't have any teeth.

If I remove the skin prior to roasting, I want to leave the fat in place, plus add a rub: a mix of garlic (no such thing as too much), thyme, rosemary, oregano, basil, cracked black pepper. Run it into the fat-gets the flavor from the fresh leaves into the fat before they are burnt to a crisp. The fat will melt with a slow roasting. For the last 15-20 minutes I turn the oven up to broil, give that fat a crispy surface.

I've carved up boston butts.
Remove the skin. This I slice/chop for the chickens.
Cut out the bone. I believe it is called the H Bone.
Select a side to cut off for a small roast. I live alone, I'll get a couple of roast cuts.
The other side is sliced into steaks. Pack a couple in a bag, store in the freezer.
Sections too small a roast and steaks are cut up for stir fry.
Fatty meat parts are cut small for use in beans/soups/stews.
Excess fat gets rendered for lard.

I'll bake the roasts, get a couple of big meals out of each. Sometimes I'll bake one off, let it cool, then slice it up for sandwiches.
I'll easily get a dozen meals out of a butt.

On some projects with the right sized crew, I'll toss a boston butt into the slow cooker, slather on the BBQ sauce, add about an inch of water, let er go all night.
Tongs will tear it apart. Take it in with some bread or rolls, the fellers tear into it. I can feed the whole crew lunch for a $10 bill. Nothing these guys like better than a hot meal.

Baking dishes used: cast iron skillet, pyrex baking pan, cast iron dutch oven.
 
William Bronson
Posts: 1413
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
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I am planning on doing one of these in my oiless "fryer" gor thanks giving
Did it before, it was great! I will be brining it this time, and adding a "tomy" ring to add smoke flavor.
 
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