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Fly worms (undesired, probably parasitical)  RSS feed

 
Paulo Carvalho
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Hello, long time reader, new time poster.
First of all, i live in brasil

My mother asked me to make a composting bin to fertilize her garden, but she didn't follow the instructions of piling earth and leaves on top of the organic matter, and as I live in another city there was no way to take care of it.

This weekend I came home to find some weird worms, that look like this
that I researched as the house fly. It also may be Dermatobia hominis, called here as Mosca Varejeira, or Varejeira Fly wich parasites humans, dogs and cattle.

I was utterly disgusted by this, seeing my sweet earth-smelling composting bin into a vermin-riddenfoul-smelling trash bin.

Is there any way to properly take care of them without poison or wasting all my compost? what should I do? i'm worried about the flies hatching and getting to the dogs.
 
John Elliott
pollinator
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Chickens.

If you throw the maggot infested compost in the chicken coop, it shouldn't take more than 5 or 10 minutes for them to scratch out and eat all the maggots.
 
Leila Rich
steward
Posts: 3999
Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
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Welcome to permies Paulo
I don't know the fly species, but in my situation, flies only lay in compost if it's too wet/nitrogen-heavy, and the maggots die if it dries out.
Does the compost smell bad at all, or feel a bit wet?
if so, are you in a position thoroughly mix in something high carbon to balance it and dry it out?
Much easier if you can do it as you move it to another area....
What you use is entirely dependent on your local situation, and I know nothing about Brazil!
I'm comfortable using paper products over here. Dried leaves, dried grass, even wood chips if you're ok with it taking a while to break down.
Make sure your mother is digging a hole in the compost, adding the new stuff and covering it up with broken-down compost.
I also cover my compost pile with old carpet-keeps the critters out, lets air and moisture in, but makes it easy for me to add stuff into the pile.
 
Michael Cox
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Location: Kent, UK - Zone 8
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Might they also be Black Soldier Fly? BSF are a totally different beast from ordinary flies - they are not a disease vector and can prevent other fly species from egg laying by out competing them.

Many people deliberately create bins of BSF because they break down organic food wastes incredibly quickly and are themselves first rate food for chicken and other birds and fish. What size are the grubs you are seeing?
 
Paulo Carvalho
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thanks everyone for the answers!

i have no chickens at home to eat the grubs and worms, but as i couldnt move the bin (kinda heavy to move alone) it has been left in place. There seems to be less worms, and local birds might be eating those that leave the bin.

I piled about 10cm of leaves up to the top of the bin, but since it's summer here and it's been raining, i doubt i'll be able to dry the composting.

The smell is less worse (i wouldnt say better), but still not the pleasant earthy smell of the first week when it was well cared for.

The liquid drained at the bottom (on another bucket) was used to fertilize plants in the front yard, wich resulted on a not very pleasant smell but oh well...

maybe i should've taken some pics, but its still not possible, so i'll do my best to post some updates, hopefully until i'm able to recover the composting, or quit this bin it it comes to that (i dont want to)
 
S Bengi
Posts: 1357
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even distribution
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If there was some way you could make a lid made of pliable "cloth" filled with dirt, shredded newspaper, leaves, it would be awesome then it could just be lift off maybe with a pulley under a tree branch.
 
Paulo Carvalho
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love the idea of the new lid. i understood the purpose would be to have a dry leaf cover (maybe add a few dry sticks below the leafs) over a cloth, wich would allow for more air on the composting?

i'm guessing half the problem on the composting was bad management, but the other half was poor planning, wich lead to both a bad managed bin and a bad designed bin

this was my first experiment, and i expect all my first experiments to fail miserably, both to not be dissapointed (well, i still was a little...) and to aim for a second better designed try



thanks again for all the feedback, as soon as i check on it again (this semester was brutal on me, trying to finish my undergrad life) i'll update the post with how the 'thing' is...


on a sidenote, a old wall fountain/spring was refurbished as a vase new compost bin. maybe this stucture will be better managed and produce compost. documenting this is added to my to-do list =)


happy holydays everyone, and may yout bins be ever healthy and happy!!!
 
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