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guinea fowl and chickens together?

 
Natasha Bailey
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Do they mix? We want the chickens to mostly free range (thinking about getting a temporary/movable fence to transport them around within borders...not sure what kind of fencing for that, need to research), we have 12 (no rooster because we've been in an urban environment so haven't been able to keep the roos, so need to introduce one to our flock, I digress). So we would love to bring guinea fowl in (frankly I'd rather have pea fowl, but it seems guineas are far superior at keeping the bug population down), but can they co-mingle and free range together? Would there be issues with parasite/worms/etc or aggression? Should I introduce them as keets or could I even put a few keets under our broody hen (she's a wyandotte if it matters)??
 
Natasha Bailey
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Natasha Bailey wrote:Do they mix? We want the chickens to mostly free range (thinking about getting a temporary/movable fence to transport them around within borders...not sure what kind of fencing for that, need to research), we have 12 (no rooster because we've been in an urban environment so haven't been able to keep the roos, so need to introduce one to our flock, I digress). So we would love to bring guinea fowl in (frankly I'd rather have pea fowl, but it seems guineas are far superior at keeping the bug population down), but can they co-mingle and free range together? Would there be issues with parasite/worms/etc or aggression? Should I introduce them as keets or could I even put a few keets under our broody hen (she's a wyandotte if it matters)??


I'm sure there's a thread already on this and that's why no one is commenting? Anybody care to link me to it?
 
Adam Klaus
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Location: 6200' westen slope of colorado, zone 6
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Hi Natasha-
Welcome to the life! It's a good one, harder than you can imagine and more rewarding than your wildest dreams.

On this, and your other questions, I would really reccomend seeking out nearby small farms that you can visit. Offer to help out for the day, and while you work, talk and ask a million questions. It is great that you are so excited for your venture, enthusiasm is a key attribute. There are just so many specifics about your site and situation, that it is pretty hard to tell you which breed of goats, or how to fence your poultry, etc. Local factors like climate, ecology, predation will be the biggest deciders for you. Visiting lots of nearby small farms will give you ideas of what is working well, and what isnt. You can pick and choose as you design your project.

The practical experience of local people, even though maybe not cutting edge in the permacultural world, will be a great asset to sound planning. Start simple, build from your successes, and then aim for the stars. good luck!
 
Leila Rich
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Natasha, unless I wasn't searching right, there's not much in the way of Guinea/chicken threads.
Here's one that talks about Guineas bullying.
 
Natasha Bailey
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Leila Rich wrote:Natasha, unless I wasn't searching right, there's not much in the way of Guinea/chicken threads.
Here's one that talks about Guineas bullying.


Hmm... have you (or anyone on here) tried putting them together. Just wondering if there's experience on this.
 
John Polk
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Jeannette S. Ferguson, author of "Gardening With Guineas" raises them together.
Hers share the coop at night, but each morning, the guineas fly over the fence, to 'work' the outside.

Her book is a great guide to raising the little noise makers.
She also has a site that has tons of information.

(If you buy the book from her site, not only will she make a couple of bucks, but will also sign it for you.)
She only makes a few pennies if you buy it elsewhere.

 
Burra Maluca
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John Polk wrote:Her book is a great guide to raising the little noise makers.



As an aside, the Portuguese word for guinea fowl is fracas. I think it's highly appropriate!
 
Thomas Onderlan
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Location: south texas
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I have guineas and chickens in a Salatin style chicken tractor and my thinking now, after more than 3 years are: Pros- 1. guineas are far better at ticks and fleas and chasing off predators, 2. guineas are great watchdogs for chickens. Cons-1. guineas harass chickens and each other 2. don't put guineas in same tractor with chickens and you're better off.
My plan now is to introduce new keets to a separate tractor in my 'chuck-wagon' train and enjoy the guineas for thanksgiving and christmas
 
Miles Flansburg
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Brother Thomas, welcome to Permies!
Great first post, please tell us more about your experience with Guineas.
 
C Lamson
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Location: western Washington
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Put into a search owning guinea fowl. They can be noisy.
 
Dave Fink
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I've had them together before. They were slightly harassing to the rooster at first but down the road, when he was challenged by a new rooster, they actually defended him...he didn't have to lift a finger, wing or whatever. The hens and the Guineas always got along. Because of their flight, they were able to come and go as they please, even if the chickens were kept in the pen for the day. They are noisy, especially as darkness falls. During the day, they alert to anything out of the ordinary. In late evening, they alert to anything that moves. Their demise came at the jaws of Jack, my chicken protecting dog, who would never harm a feather on a chicken...he just refused to tolerate their insolence. Consequently, they've never been replaced.
 
Katy Whitby-last
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Location: North East Scotland
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I keep them together with no problems. however, they fly pretty high so keeping them penned in the same area may be difficult. If you want them to stay together more then do hatch them under a broody hen - I have one GF who was hatched in the incubator with some ducks and is now inseparable from them. It has no interest in the other GF and just hangs out at the edge of the pond.
 
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