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Vegetables You Can Eat and Replant

 
Travis Philp
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To regenerate the following all you have to leave is an inch or two of the base of the stem which is attached to the root, bulb, or root base depending on which plant it is. I've had success with the following veggies

leeks

onions

cabbage

lettuce

celery
 
Leah Sattler
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great idea for a list.

I suppose tubers could go on this list too. at least some of them. regular potatoes and sunchokes.
 
                                  
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Haven't done it myself, but I heard of a person who ate the same exact carrots for several years in a row by replanting the top every time they ate one!
 
Chelle Lewis
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I would add Pineapple in hopes... have got a top to re-root... and hoping it will produce fruit.
 
Chelle Lewis
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rosemary wrote:
Haven't done it myself, but I heard of a person who ate the same exact carrots for several years in a row by replanting the top every time they ate one!
I have been trying to do that... the monkeys think it's monkey hotel... I pop it into the ground... and they pop it into their mouth.

One thing... the leaves are good eating too.

Chelle
 
Travis Philp
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Yeah I was going to add the carrot idea to the list but my one attempt at it failed. The carrot did sprout but it rotted. I tried the Mollison-recommended paper towel method though. Maybe I'll give another go with direct placement in the soil this year.
 
Jennifer Smith
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I have carrot tops growing all over my house.  Simply cut off top 1 inch or so and put in soil...it may take a bit to see anything but then she is off and growing.  I mean I have them in glass jars with no drainage and they are still growing, but I try to not over water but they are very pretty and well behaived house plants.  If I was home I could get photos
 
Travis Philp
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Then I wonder if similar root crops would do the same...parsnips, salsify, parsley root, beets, turnips, swedes? Has anybody tried these?
 
larry korn
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It would seem that the next great permaculture frontier would be perennial vegetables.  How about adding asparagus and garlic to the list?  There is also the book, Perennial Vegetables, by Eric Toensmeier (Chelsea Green Press).  He's got a lot of good ideas and spotlights many vegetables that are grown as perennials.  I hadn't heard of many of them and I understand availability of some of these "oddballs" is limited.  If someone is successful with some of these please let us know and save the seeds.
 
Jennifer Smith
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I often recommend asparagus.  It has grown readily for me from seed, all over the country.  It takes a few years to establish but well worth it.  I have planted the all male roots and may again, but seed is cheap.  I mean growes super well for me, grows wild in many parts of the country even.
 
Travis Philp
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larry korn wrote:
It would seem that the next great permaculture frontier would be perennial vegetables.  How about adding asparagus and garlic to the list?  There is also the book, Perennial Vegetables, by Eric Toensmeier (Chelsea Green Press).  He's got a lot of good ideas and spotlights many vegetables that are grown as perennials.  I hadn't heard of many of them and I understand availability of some of these "oddballs" is limited.  If someone is successful with some of these please let us know and save the seeds.


I agree that perennial vegetables are the way to go. I just thought that I'd let people know about the annuals that you can regrow from small parts of the often unedible/unpalatable parts of the plants.

I have Erics book but found that its species list was too geared towards warmer climates than mine. I already knew about most of the species that were aclimated to my region. That being said, I think its a good book and would recommend it to those further south than myself.
 
rose macaskie
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  all new to me. whats the paper towel method.: I planted whole leeks because i saw some that had flower and they were neorouse an dbeautiful but i didnt imagine planting stube of vegetabes that is wayout. agri rose macaskie.
 
Jennifer Smith
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I will buy beets next time I go to the store and try to grow them.  I will do them like carrots and cut the tops off as well as the bottems.
 
Travis Philp
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rose macaskie wrote:
 whats the paper towel method


The paper towel method goes like this:

-Take a carrot top stub and place it on a wet paper towel until the carrot sprouts and the leaves grow to about 2 inches (Could be wrong on the two inches because I'm going from memory)

-Then plant it into the ground

But this is all apparently a waste of time as there are those who bypass the paper towel part of it and simply plant the stubs right into soil.

 
larry korn
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Yeah, that's a problem with many books.  They are often geared to one climate or the other.  Many of the books listing ornamental, for example, are geared to the East Coast of the United States and are pretty useless to us near the West Coast.

It's true that there are perennial vegetables and then there are many annuals that sort of act like perennials because they reseed themselves so readily.
 
Jennifer Smith
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Some of my carrot tops from the grocery
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I have bulb fennel in the house all winter. I keep it in a wide mouth mason jar (half pint) so just the bottom is in water. I take cuttings and it continues to grow. In the spring, I'll plant it outside. This fennel bulb is two or three years old. I plant way more to eat when I plant out but this one is my "pet" fennel. 

I also keep herb pots indoors and cut all winter and then put out in spring but thats not anything new.
 
Scott Reil
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My horseradishes fit this description and of course the aspargus beds as well...

LOTS of culinary herbs too...

HG
 
tel jetson
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larry korn wrote:
It would seem that the next great permaculture frontier would be perennial vegetables...  If someone is successful with some of these please let us know and save the seeds.


haven't tried enough of them out yet, but I've had good luck with groundnut (Apios americana), crosne (Stachys affinis), crambe (Crambe maritima), chufa (Cyperus esculentus), and a handful of others that I'm having trouble recalling just now.  I bought some air potatoes (Dioscorea bulbifera) a couple of years ago, but managed to kill them all.  when I tried to order some more, they had been made illegal to sell or ship.  I really badly want some more air potatoes.
 
tel jetson
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and ramps (Allium tricoccum).  delicious.
 
Chelle Lewis
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Jennifer Smith  "listenstohorses" wrote:
I have carrot tops growing all over my house.  Simply cut off top 1 inch or so and put in soil...it may take a bit to see anything but then she is off and growing.  I mean I have them in glass jars with no drainage and they are still growing, but I try to not over water but they are very pretty and well behaived house plants.  If I was home I could get photos
  Definitely monkey proof. I must admit to having done that too... but kept forgetting to water them. They do look nice though .... when watered.

Chelle
 
bunkie weir
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great pics jennifersmith!  i do the same thing. right now i have the end of a Boc Choy and one of a Romaine lettuce in dirt. i first put them in water till they started producing leaves, then potted. handy way to get greens in the winter.
 
Leah Sattler
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do things that will happily regrow after being cut back belong on this list? not only do you get to eat part of the plant but you don't even have to "replant" anything, it just stays put. 
 
Jennifer Smith
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This is a great thread.  If everyone just keeps saying what they know there will be lots of information here for all to share.

I think my roomie has romaine for her bunnies, I will check and see, if so I will plant it too, thanks. 

If I knew what to do with fennel I would grow that too.  I have seen it and it is pretty to me.
 
Travis Philp
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Leah Sattler wrote:
do things that will happily regrow after being cut back belong on this list? not only do you get to eat part of the plant but you don't even have to "replant" anything, it just stays put.   


I dunno, the thread is kinda branching off a bit from the subject which might muddy the waters for people doing searches. My intention was to simply get a list of things you could eat and replant because I didn't think there was much awareness of this. For later search engine purposes I think it should stay that way with Perennial Vegetables and 'regrowers' aka cut-and-come-again crops having their own thread. I think I'll start a perennial vegetables thread (if there isn't one already)


I say all this and sound heavy with it but I'm grateful for all the contributions at the same time. So look out for the Perennial Vegetables and cut and come again thread
 
Jennifer Smith
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Leah,

I would like to know please.  Maybe copy the list to, or from the new threads, if you don't mind.

I do not always get notified of new stuff and only every so often have time to look for new topics/threads to follow.

I know I miss out on stuff I know, but I have things to do.
 
Jennifer Smith
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How about Ginger or sweet potatoe that one can plant half and eat half?  I have ginger in now, we will see if it sprouts.
 
larry korn
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I was just thinking about sweet potatoes when I saw your last posting.  Remember when you were in the first grade and stuck half a sweet potatoes in a jar of water supported by toothpicks?  Next thing the vines and leaves were all over the kitchen walls and ceiling.

In southern California where I grew up we grew avocados the same way.  I'm going to post this quickly before we get sent off to another forumland.
 
Jennifer Smith
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I have never gotten anything to grow that way, with toothpicks in water. 

I have, I think, 3 perenniel beds of sweet potatoes in Alabama (zone 7) but will have to winter (roots and/or vine) indoors over the winter here in zone 5. 

I have a sweet potato in soil in my front window now.  It has not sprouted yet.  We will see how it goes.  It is from grocery.  If it does not sprout I will get a start from down south.
 
                    
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Well, I thought I posted this here, but it must have been another thread?

We ordered some cuttings of Tree Collards from Bountiful Gardens in Oregon.  The description from their website:

Tree Collards are much like regular collard greens except that they are 5-6 feet tall with purple-tinted leaves growing up a single tall stalk. They are perennial in zones 8-9. In other zones, cuttings may be taken as winter begins and rooted indoors for planting out the following spring. Their history and biological identity seem to be shrouded in mystery, but they are reputed to come from Africa and have been preserved and passed on within African-American communities in this country. They do not normally flower or make seed, and when they do, the seed does not breed true. Instead propagation is by cuttings, which are passed along from gardener to gardener. Tree collard greens are tender and delicious in cool weather, so they are a good choice for a low-maintenance winter vegetable in mild climates. (They're pretty good in warm weather also.)

Let you know how ours take, and will offer cuttings when and if they do. 
 
jeremiah bailey
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I learned about doing this with onions when I was a boy. Has anyone tried taking the stub that you'd replant and cut it radially into pieces like a pizza? I have sneaking suspicion that it'd propagate this way. Make sure you have some rootlets on each piece.

Actually, after looking around, I found this: http://www.instructables.com/id/Grow-Onions-from-Discarded-Onion-Bottoms/ Which describes sprouting the bottom and then cutting the separate stalks away from the root section. I think I'm going to try both ways with the next batch of onions we cook with.
 
Jennifer Smith
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I grew several onion bottems, just planted them shallow, root side down. They grew into pretty onion plants that my goat very much enjoyed...end of onion experiment for now.  Each bottem grew into about 3 plants.
 
Chelle Lewis
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larry korn wrote:
I was just thinking about sweet potatoes when I saw your last posting.  Remember when you were in the first grade and stuck half a sweet potatoes in a jar of water supported by toothpicks?  Next thing the vines and leaves were all over the kitchen walls and ceiling.

When I see a Sweet Potato has sprouted in the bag I just chop off the sprout.... cook the rest... and plant the sprouted piece in my Food Forest. Takes off like crazy. I do that with Potatoes too... but want to do that in a Potato Tower now.

I have an avo tree from toothpick sprouting.

Chelle
 
                    
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I was a bit confused as to why there were two threads for "cut and come again" and veggies you can replant, because sometimes plants are sort of in both catagories.  The tree collards I mentioned, for instance, can be harvested all season and they'll regrow, but in order to make them grow again, you have to save some of the leaves to replant the next year.    So that's why I posted them in both threads. 

I do agree that there's an important difference between "replanting" and true perennials.  That deserves its own thread. 
 
larry korn
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Chelle, So good to hear that you have an avacado from a toothpick planting!  They usually need a pollinator to fruit
 
Jennifer Smith
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My cousin near SanDiego CA has 5 acres of avacodos and he grows like 5 kinds for good pollination.  I really do not know much about it though.  He is the principal of Escondito High School. 
 
Jocelyn Campbell
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Travis, when growing from the base or stem is the plant as robust, or perhaps more so, than starting from seed?

I'd read about doing this with beets - planting the beet tops in damp sand or a pot of earth under the sink and then having beet greens to eat all winter.

I think the under the sink was both for protection from winter frost and for a fairly cool spot in a heated home, but wouldn't the leaves be pale or sickly without sun?

I love beet greens--maybe I'll have to try this in my window sill...
 
Joel Hollingsworth
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Mint works.

I've also seen strawberries grow from discarded stems: enough of the skin was left hanging, that a few viable seeds must have been included.
 
Jennifer Smith
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My carrot seed never made such a nice plant, set of plants realy, as the carrot tops make... but I don't think they will regrow a carrot, just seed.  Several plants come up from one carrot top.

I plan to buy beets next time I am in town... I don't think I have ever had beet greens.  I like pickled beets.  I agree that is seems sun is needed for greens.
 
Jennifer Smith
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I planted a romaine heart today.  Carrots grow almost before my eyes...farther from light grow as fast (or faster) but are lighter green.
 
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