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Stone Baerm Adventures

 
pollinator
Posts: 193
Location: Stone Baerm Permaculture Homestead
90
goat dog gear books bike building
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Today was nice and busy. It started with chores as usual, then I got the scythe out and cleared a bunch of stinging nettle out of the horse paddock. I think I might take some of the fallen nettle and give it to the horses and goats tomorrow for a nutritious snack.

After that I watched a farrier work on Snoopy and Midnight, two dwarf horses. It is a neat trade and it sounds like there is a shortage of good workers so any of you who like horses, this could be an option for you!

Following that I helped build a bit of road. We took the excess sand that I dug out from my hugel beds, and moved it over to another spot and put it all there. There are no little tractors around here, so it was a serious workout. I took a break afterwards, then headed back out to watch the fire that was started to fry up some burgers. We got the fire burning nice and hot, then moved the coals into a mini barbecue to cook the burgers. So tonight we're having a nice dinner of burgers, followed by some cake (I turned 23 yesterday, I know I am getting up there).

Finally I did a bit more scything. Now I am pooped for the rest of the day I think.  

Oh and this morning I officially milked over a quart of milk, and got the badge bit! I also finished up a mallet for one of the roundwood badges. So overall this was a busy day and I am tired, but it is a very satisfying kind of tired.
nettle.gif
Cutting that nettle right up
Cutting that nettle right up
cheerleaders.jpg
It's good to have moral support when scything
It's good to have moral support when scything
 
Cam Haslehurst
pollinator
Posts: 193
Location: Stone Baerm Permaculture Homestead
90
goat dog gear books bike building
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Another busy day today. My big project was dismantling an old trellis that was starting to fall apart. We're going to put another one up in its place, but a little less 'busy' I think. I took photos and made a gif but the angle isn't the greatest. Oh well. The structure was screwed together and tied together with wire. So lots of unscrewing and (careful) untwisting of rusty wire. I didn't burn but I definitely got some sun out there.

Following that we started to get the fence up! We took the panels from the inside of the pillars, then attached them to the outside. See the second photo to see what I mean. We're getting there, and we're getting closer to the goats being allowed to roam free once again

On the subject of goats still being fenced in, I gave them a treat tonight. I brought them some of the stinging nettle I scythed yesterday, along with some fresh stuff I cut today. Needless to say they enjoyed it. I felt like that cool cafeteria supervisor who would help pay for a student's lunch if the student forgot their lunch money. You know, the one everyone liked. I think the goats are going to like me more now - I'll be the guy who brings nettle. At least until they're out roaming free, then I'll go back to just being the new guy.

I also brought some to the three horses and they all munched on it too. I don't know if they're just seriously tough or what but I sure as hell am not going to start snacking on some raw stinging nettle.
trellis.gif
[Thumbnail for trellis.gif]
fence-in.jpg
Progress!
Progress!
goat-feast.jpg
Yum
Yum
horse-feast.jpg
Midnight, Snoopy and Wishaw getting in on the action
Midnight, Snoopy and Wishaw getting in on the action
 
Cam Haslehurst
pollinator
Posts: 193
Location: Stone Baerm Permaculture Homestead
90
goat dog gear books bike building
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Today was seriously toasty. We got up to 29C (84F for the americans reading). That paired with some high humidity made everyone sluggish. For you folks further south this probably sounds like nothing, but after 6 months of chilly stuff it takes some getting used to. I still got stuff done, just at half my usual pace. I gathered up all the wood from the old trellis first. I peeled the fiberglass off some pieces, because they were originally blank rejects from a nearby hockey stick manufacturer (very canadian form of reusing). Once it was off I broke everything into smaller pieces, then tied the pieces into little bundles for the rocketstove in the outdoor kitchen.

Following that I helped build some more box frames to go around the last post. We are getting very close to the goats running free! I brought them some nore snacks today, to cheer them up in this heat. I gave them more nettle, some motherwort, some grass, and some other grassy flowers. It was fun to watch them eat. The more experienced older ones ran straight over to me and munched away, but the little ones hesitated more. It was good to see how cautious they were. They'd watch their mom eat it right up, then they'd start slowly nibbling away.

Oh and almost forgot. We did some chicken processing this morning. The other guy living here has a good set up with a local small food mart. He collects the scraps that would other wise be tossed, and they get put to use here on the farm. There was a lot of chicken he picked up recently that was past due. So he boiled it on the fire box yesterday, and we all picked the meat from the bones this morning. The meat will be food for Remi, the great pyrenees who lives here. The bones were boiled again, and will be crushed then put into the garden. Now I really gotta get going on the bone crusher tool.

rocket-stove-bundles.jpg
I forgot to take a pic while I was doing this so this is from my bedroom, didn't feel like going back outside
I forgot to take a pic while I was doing this so this is from my bedroom, didn't feel like going back outside
wood.jpg
State of the art wood processing facility
State of the art wood processing facility
meals-on-wheels.jpg
The goat salad mix
The goat salad mix
chicken.jpg
Chicken processing this morning
Chicken processing this morning
 
Cam Haslehurst
pollinator
Posts: 193
Location: Stone Baerm Permaculture Homestead
90
goat dog gear books bike building
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Whoopsie doo I missed another day. Yesterday I was very tired. I stayed up a little later than usual the night before, then we had another real scorcher of a day. I laid down around 9:45pm to read and cool down. I read until around 10:45pm then 'rested my eyes' for what I thought would be 10-15 minutes. I ended up waking up at 1:00am realizing that I had slept through evening chores. Oops. Apparently they did try to wake me up but I am a rather heavy sleeper so I continued snoozing.

Needless to say I had a good amount of energy this morning. It was another real hot day at 32C with high humidity that gave things that tropical feeling. Still got some work done on the fence though. We edge closer by the day to being done.

Other than that, I collected some more salad mix for the goats and horses. I got more nettle, some dandelions, mint, grass, and some small purple flowers too. They all munched happily on the mix. I was working very slowly when doing this, but I still had beads of sweat on my forehead by the end. It looks like we're getting rain tomorrow though, and that will bring some welcome relief from the heat. I'd rather hot and rainy than hot and humid.

Finally, yesterday I started another roundwood BB. I'm making the two coat hooks. I finished one, but then I lost it :( So I finished the other one and now I've got one complete. Oh well, I'll get another one done.
investigating.jpg
One of the curious babies
One of the curious babies
feast.jpg
I brought more spring mix to the goats and horses today
I brought more spring mix to the goats and horses today
weed-burning.jpg
Keeping the skitters away with green smoke - worked well
Keeping the skitters away with green smoke - worked well
soon-hooks.jpg
Hooks before I started removing the bark
Hooks before I started removing the bark
 
Cam Haslehurst
pollinator
Posts: 193
Location: Stone Baerm Permaculture Homestead
90
goat dog gear books bike building
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Taking a midday break so I thought might as well do the post now. We're waiting on the lime to mix for the fence, so none of that today. Instead I'm starting on some other smaller projects. The first one is the bone crusher tool that I've mentioned several times now. It's a very simple project but should be pretty useful when done. Just an 8lb sledge head with some tubing welded on for a handle. That way two hands can be used with much less fatigue than trying to grip the head by itself. Gonna do some test welds on the tubing but I think I might do tacks with the 1/8" 6011 and do the rest with the 7018. The tubing has a relatively thin wall and I don't want to burn through, so I'm going to try to focus the heat on the hammer head and let the puddle flow onto the tubing instead of the opposite (which may burn a hole in the tubing). That's the master plan at least we'll see how it pans out.

The next small project is the handle on a scoop from the kitchen. The weld that was there came undone, so now the cup sags when it's full of liquid. My job is to weld it back together. Most of the work will be grinding, the welding will take about 10 seconds after set up if all goes to plan. I think I might use a chainsaw file to remove the enameling from the groove because it's too small and fragile to get my grinder in there. Following that all it basically needs is a little more than a tack weld with the 7018 rod I think. Or if that's too hot we can buy some 1/16" 6013 rods and try those out. Too cold will make things kind of ugly, but the pot will still function. Going too hot though might actually make the pot useless if I burn right through, so I'm gonna lean towards the cold side.

Finally we've got a milk pot with a tiny hole in the bottom of it. The metal is so thin that I think I'm going to need some sort of heatsink if I'm going to weld without burning through. This project I MAY attempt but we will see. It has the biggest chance of them all for me to mess up and make things substantially worse than they are now.

I've also got three coat hooks done that I'm excited to put up somewhere when I get home. Maybe at the cottage or in the garage.
head.jpg
Head of the crusher. Ground rust off to make for a easier and better weld
Head of the crusher. Ground rust off to make for a easier and better weld
handle.jpg
Handle cut 1" longer than needed incase I mess something up. Cutting more off is easier than adding new metal
Handle cut 1" longer than needed incase I mess something up. Cutting more off is easier than adding new metal
scoop.jpg
Kitchen scoop
Kitchen scoop
gap.jpg
Gap that needs to be filled
Gap that needs to be filled
milk-jug.jpg
[Thumbnail for milk-jug.jpg]
little-hole.jpg
Pin hole to be filled
Pin hole to be filled
 
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Cam Haslehurst wrote:Today was nice and busy. It started with chores as usual, then I got the scythe out and cleared a bunch of stinging nettle out of the horse paddock. I think I might take some of the fallen nettle and give it to the horses and goats tomorrow for a nutritious snack.

After that I watched a farrier work on Snoopy and Midnight, two dwarf horses. It is a neat trade and it sounds like there is a shortage of good workers so any of you who like horses, this could be an option for you!

Following that I helped build a bit of road. We took the excess sand that I dug out from my hugel beds, and moved it over to another spot and put it all there. There are no little tractors around here, so it was a serious workout. I took a break afterwards, then headed back out to watch the fire that was started to fry up some burgers. We got the fire burning nice and hot, then moved the coals into a mini barbecue to cook the burgers. So tonight we're having a nice dinner of burgers, followed by some cake (I turned 23 yesterday, I know I am getting up there).

Finally I did a bit more scything. Now I am pooped for the rest of the day I think.  

Oh and this morning I officially milked over a quart of milk, and got the badge bit! I also finished up a mallet for one of the roundwood badges. So overall this was a busy day and I am tired, but it is a very satisfying kind of tired.



Hey I'm curious about the goat milk. Do you guys drink it as well as having it in yogourt?
 
Lorianne Haslehurst
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Cam Haslehurst wrote:Another busy day today. My big project was dismantling an old trellis that was starting to fall apart. We're going to put another one up in its place, but a little less 'busy' I think. I took photos and made a gif but the angle isn't the greatest. Oh well. The structure was screwed together and tied together with wire. So lots of unscrewing and (careful) untwisting of rusty wire. I didn't burn but I definitely got some sun out there.

Following that we started to get the fence up! We took the panels from the inside of the pillars, then attached them to the outside. See the second photo to see what I mean. We're getting there, and we're getting closer to the goats being allowed to roam free once again

On the subject of goats still being fenced in, I gave them a treat tonight. I brought them some of the stinging nettle I scythed yesterday, along with some fresh stuff I cut today. Needless to say they enjoyed it. I felt like that cool cafeteria supervisor who would help pay for a student's lunch if the student forgot their lunch money. You know, the one everyone liked. I think the goats are going to like me more now - I'll be the guy who brings nettle. At least until they're out roaming free, then I'll go back to just being the new guy.

I also brought some to the three horses and they all munched on it too. I don't know if they're just seriously tough or what but I sure as hell am not going to start snacking on some raw stinging nettle.



I'll have to look into this stinging nettle. It sounds kind of nasty.  I have no idea what it is right now but your animals sure seem to like it!
 
Lorianne Haslehurst
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Cam Haslehurst wrote:Today was seriously toasty. We got up to 29C (84F for the americans reading). That paired with some high humidity made everyone sluggish. For you folks further south this probably sounds like nothing, but after 6 months of chilly stuff it takes some getting used to. I still got stuff done, just at half my usual pace. I gathered up all the wood from the old trellis first. I peeled the fiberglass off some pieces, because they were originally blank rejects from a nearby hockey stick manufacturer (very canadian form of reusing). Once it was off I broke everything into smaller pieces, then tied the pieces into little bundles for the rocketstove in the outdoor kitchen.

Following that I helped build some more box frames to go around the last post. We are getting very close to the goats running free! I brought them some nore snacks today, to cheer them up in this heat. I gave them more nettle, some motherwort, some grass, and some other grassy flowers. It was fun to watch them eat. The more experienced older ones ran straight over to me and munched away, but the little ones hesitated more. It was good to see how cautious they were. They'd watch their mom eat it right up, then they'd start slowly nibbling away.

Oh and almost forgot. We did some chicken processing this morning. The other guy living here has a good set up with a local small food mart. He collects the scraps that would other wise be tossed, and they get put to use here on the farm. There was a lot of chicken he picked up recently that was past due. So he boiled it on the fire box yesterday, and we all picked the meat from the bones this morning. The meat will be food for Remi, the great pyrenees who lives here. The bones were boiled again, and will be crushed then put into the garden. Now I really gotta get going on the bone crusher tool.

Oooh I like the look of the green smoke for the mosquitoes!

 
Cam Haslehurst
pollinator
Posts: 193
Location: Stone Baerm Permaculture Homestead
90
goat dog gear books bike building
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Lorianne Haslehurst wrote:
Hey I'm curious about the goat milk. Do you guys drink it as well as having it in yogourt?



Yes you can drink it as milk but I actually don't too much. It's not that I don't like it, I just tend to eat yogurt when I'm hungry and have cold water for a drink. She makes all soft cheese, hard cheese, yogurt, and cream is skimmed off the top of the milk too. Lots of goat dairy around here.

Lorianne Haslehurst wrote:
Oooh I like the look of the green smoke for the mosquitoes!



It works pretty darn well, as long as you've got at least a slight breeze. I know why the bugs don't like it though - it is unpleasant. Most smoke is, but I accidentally took a whole lung's worth of it when I was blowing on the coals and it was nasty. Don't breathe in green smoke if you can avoid it.

Lorianne Haslehurst wrote:
I'll have to look into this stinging nettle. It sounds kind of nasty.  I have no idea what it is right now but your animals sure seem to like it!



I've rubbed my wrists on it a couple times by accident now and it's not pleasant. It's not excruciating by any means, but it's a stinging sensation that sits with you for a little while. I got little white spots where I rubbed it and they stayed there a couple hours. I'm still mysitified as to whether the goats and horses are just badasses or if they have something in their saliva that neutralizes the sting.

I know next to nothing about it but I've heard it has good medicinal properties when made into teas and whatnot, so that's something to look into.

-------

It was cooler today! 18C (64F) was the high today and boy was it refreshing. I only worked up a sweat once, when I was scything out in the sun.

We got the potatoes in today. The process was fairly simple, and it sounds like it's very low maintenance from here on out. We got a bag of seed potatoes from last year, then brought them to the mulched area. We started in the middle and worked our way out at first, but then transitioned to kind of doing row planting. Someone who likes order and organization might have had a fit, but we got them in! For each potato we dug into the hay down to the more composted stuff. Then we put a handful of well-composted barn mix, then potatoes, then more mix, then the hay lightly covered everything. Last year they didn't water the potatoes once, and they still got a great yield.

Yesterday after my midday post I went for a long bike ride around the area, and this place is just beautiful. There's a road that goes right alongside the lake, and with the blue sky blotted with fluffy white clouds it was a sight to see.

Later today I did some more work on the hugel beds. I put a layer of goat manure/hay mix, then scythed a bigger plot and dropped the cuts in as well. I still had extra afterwards so the goats got a bonus snack.
taters.gif
How the taters were planted
How the taters were planted
bike-ride-views.jpg
The camera doesn't do it justice but gives you an idea
The camera doesn't do it justice but gives you an idea
scythed.jpg
Did some scything today, then brought the cuts to Hugh and Gill
Did some scything today, then brought the cuts to Hugh and Gill
Hugh-and-Gill-today.jpg
The two beds after getting some chop and drop action
The two beds after getting some chop and drop action
 
Cam Haslehurst
pollinator
Posts: 193
Location: Stone Baerm Permaculture Homestead
90
goat dog gear books bike building
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Another relatively cool day today which was nice. Clear blue sky too and breezy. So a beautiful day all in all.

We started by repairing some fencing around the perimeter of the property. The electric fence had snapped in one spot, so we needed to disconnect the section,  get some slack and re-tie it. After that a whipper snipper took care of the plants growing under the electric fence. I used an axe to take off a low hanging branch above the fence that was close to touching. Later on we went further in and fixed up the fence there. Some posts were leaning so I helped to bang them back in straight. Others were too far gone, so we replaced them with metal t-bars. It was actually pretty fun knocking the bars in with the post driver. It's just like a hammer to me. Let gravity do most of the work then at the last second give it a boost and you can get a real hard hit with relatively little effort. I did scrape one finger when a top of one of the posts busted (it was getting old) and my hand scraped the wood. Pretty minor cut though.

Following the repairs I had some breakfast and watched more of the Geoff Lawton PDC. I'm going to do about an hour a day to make sure I finish before I leave. We're getting into concepts and themes in permaculture right now. So far I am finding it pretty interesting.

And can you guess what I did later on? Yeah I got the scythe and sickle out again. Sliced and diced those poor plants in the horse paddock until I had an overflowing wheelbarrow, then made a Skip the Browsing delivery to the goats. They now know that seeing me and a wheelbarrow means snacks so they come running as soon as they see me now. But the fence is just about done so soon they won't need the deliveries!

Tonight I did a strength workout and then some stretches. I also watched a movie called Bright on netflix which was great. Thought it was cheesy at the start but ended up really enjoying it.
skip-the-browsing.jpg
This is a good way to make friends
This is a good way to make friends
fencing.jpg
Some of the sad looking posts needing to be banged in more
Some of the sad looking posts needing to be banged in more
shit-delivery.jpg
Forgot to mention this in the post. We also brought some manure and barn mix down a plot further down in the property
Forgot to mention this in the post. We also brought some manure and barn mix down a plot further down in the property
 
Cam Haslehurst
pollinator
Posts: 193
Location: Stone Baerm Permaculture Homestead
90
goat dog gear books bike building
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Back up to the toasty weather again. 30C and humid out, so not a whole lot of activity. I did do some work on the hugels though and they are just about ready to be planted in. Put some cardboard down, then stabbed it repeatedly to make sure roots and water can get through before it decomposes. Then I alternated between layers of barn mix and cuttings from the surrounding area. Then some more ash sprinkled on. Then some fully composted barn mix that had been scratched through by the chickens. Just another wheelbarrow and a bit of the composted mix and they are ready to plant! I think I might try some squash in them.

Other than that I really didn't do too much today. Lots of reading, but not a lot of doing. Oh well, gotta read too!
hugh-gill-progress.gif
The progress I made today
The progress I made today
garter-snake-buddy.jpg
This guy let me get real close before he slithered off
This guy let me get real close before he slithered off
 
Cam Haslehurst
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Posts: 193
Location: Stone Baerm Permaculture Homestead
90
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Today was a big day! The fence is offically done - and that means the goats were released! They were actually very relaxed and leisurely when they walked out of the barn. It was neat to see them all out roaming. The babies got to work smacking their heads together. For Daisy's two daughters it was their first time outdoors as they were born in December of last year. At first they ate like everyone else, but then they started to run around, clearly just having a blast. Jumping over logs, bumping into other goats trying to eat, and smacking heads.

Now that they're out I want to see if I can get a picture of the babies about to butt heads in midair. I've got my DSLR here so I can mess with shutter speeds and all the rest and have fun. I've got very willing subjects, especially since I made all the deliveries while they were still in the barn. They actually approach when they see me coming now, which will make it a whole lot easier to get good photos.

I am also just about done my hugel beds! I put a good layer of the fully composted barn mix on both beds, then I went to down on the nettle and grass to put together a mulch layer. For the first time I actually cut myself with the sickle. Just doing the grab and slice and movement I've been doing for a bit now, but got my pinky. It's a minor cut because I had gloves on, but it's still a reminder to be careful. If I wasn't wearing the gloves I think it would have been worse, as I just sharpened the sickle today. That aside, Hugh and Gill are (just about) ready for planting! Just a couple more handfuls of mulch and I can put some squash seeds in there. So two big projects done today. This will open things up for some new projects to get going.

Oh, and I made a post about how kids these days are not willing to work anymore - that discussion is here.

cuddles_.jpg
The buck and Pearl engaging in some PDA
The buck and Pearl engaging in some PDA
wishaw_.jpg
Wishaw visited me while I was getting mulch for the beds
Wishaw visited me while I was getting mulch for the beds
bundles.jpg
Took the small branches off a dead tree in the garden, now ready for rocket stove
Took the small branches off a dead tree in the garden, now ready for rocket stove
majestic-eh.jpg
The buck on his way to scratch his head on a little tree trunk
The buck on his way to scratch his head on a little tree trunk
 
Lorianne Haslehurst
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Cam Haslehurst wrote:Today was a big day! The fence is offically done - and that means the goats were released! They were actually very relaxed and leisurely when they walked out of the barn. It was neat to see them all out roaming. The babies got to work smacking their heads together. For Daisy's two daughters it was their first time outdoors as they were born in December of last year. At first they ate like everyone else, but then they started to run around, clearly just having a blast. Jumping over logs, bumping into other goats trying to eat, and smacking heads.

Now that they're out I want to see if I can get a picture of the babies about to butt heads in midair. I've got my DSLR here so I can mess with shutter speeds and all the rest and have fun. I've got very willing subjects, especially since I made all the deliveries while they were still in the barn. They actually approach when they see me coming now, which will make it a whole lot easier to get good photos.

I am also just about done my hugel beds! I put a good layer of the fully composted barn mix on both beds, then I went to down on the nettle and grass to put together a mulch layer. For the first time I actually cut myself with the sickle. Just doing the grab and slice and movement I've been doing for a bit now, but got my pinky. It's a minor cut because I had gloves on, but it's still a reminder to be careful. If I wasn't wearing the gloves I think it would have been worse, as I just sharpened the sickle today. That aside, Hugh and Gill are (just about) ready for planting! Just a couple more handfuls of mulch and I can put some squash seeds in there. So two big projects done today. This will open things up for some new projects to get going.

Oh, and I made a post about how kids these days are not willing to work anymore - that discussion is here.


Hey Cam!  That is so exciting that your hugel beds are almost done.  I've made another sheet mulch in the front yard.  You probably remember how dry it is up there.  So far I've put about 3 hours into it and I'm using leaves from the neighbours yards.  They have been very happy to hand over their big paper bags of leaves to me so I can run them over with the lawn mower and then put them in the mulch.  The paper bags will be able to be reused as well to make more sheet mulches.  Dad and Jamie think I'm a bit nuts but I'm having a ball.  Getting my exercise after school building healthy soil in the front yard.  I'm not sure what we will grow there but my vision is to have all kinds of plants up there (maybe transplant some trees from the backyard, perennial flowers, ferns, and Dad wants to add more berries too.)
 
Lorianne Haslehurst
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Cam Haslehurst wrote:

Lorianne Haslehurst wrote:
Hey I'm curious about the goat milk. Do you guys drink it as well as having it in yogourt?



Yes you can drink it as milk but I actually don't too much. It's not that I don't like it, I just tend to eat yogurt when I'm hungry and have cold water for a drink. She makes all soft cheese, hard cheese, yogurt, and cream is skimmed off the top of the milk too. Lots of goat dairy around here.

Lorianne Haslehurst wrote:
Oooh I like the look of the green smoke for the mosquitoes!



It works pretty darn well, as long as you've got at least a slight breeze. I know why the bugs don't like it though - it is unpleasant. Most smoke is, but I accidentally took a whole lung's worth of it when I was blowing on the coals and it was nasty. Don't breathe in green smoke if you can avoid it.

Lorianne Haslehurst wrote:
I'll have to look into this stinging nettle. It sounds kind of nasty.  I have no idea what it is right now but your animals sure seem to like it!



I've rubbed my wrists on it a couple times by accident now and it's not pleasant. It's not excruciating by any means, but it's a stinging sensation that sits with you for a little while. I got little white spots where I rubbed it and they stayed there a couple hours. I'm still mysitified as to whether the goats and horses are just badasses or if they have something in their saliva that neutralizes the sting.

I know next to nothing about it but I've heard it has good medicinal properties when made into teas and whatnot, so that's something to look into.

-------

It was cooler today! 18C (64F) was the high today and boy was it refreshing. I only worked up a sweat once, when I was scything out in the sun.

We got the potatoes in today. The process was fairly simple, and it sounds like it's very low maintenance from here on out. We got a bag of seed potatoes from last year, then brought them to the mulched area. We started in the middle and worked our way out at first, but then transitioned to kind of doing row planting. Someone who likes order and organization might have had a fit, but we got them in! For each potato we dug into the hay down to the more composted stuff. Then we put a handful of well-composted barn mix, then potatoes, then more mix, then the hay lightly covered everything. Last year they didn't water the potatoes once, and they still got a great yield.

Yesterday after my midday post I went for a long bike ride around the area, and this place is just beautiful. There's a road that goes right alongside the lake, and with the blue sky blotted with fluffy white clouds it was a sight to see.

Later today I did some more work on the hugel beds. I put a layer of goat manure/hay mix, then scythed a bigger plot and dropped the cuts in as well. I still had extra afterwards so the goats got a bonus snack.



The potatoes sound interesting Cam.  Auntie Lisa said she loves to grow them.  It has been getting crazy cold up here so I've not put any veggies in the garden yet.  Maybe this weekend.  I'm still not sure what we're putting in there.  I'll let you know!
 
Cam Haslehurst
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Location: Stone Baerm Permaculture Homestead
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Lorianne Haslehurst wrote:
Hey Cam!  That is so exciting that your hugel beds are almost done.  I've made another sheet mulch in the front yard.  You probably remember how dry it is up there.  So far I've put about 3 hours into it and I'm using leaves from the neighbours yards.  They have been very happy to hand over their big paper bags of leaves to me so I can run them over with the lawn mower and then put them in the mulch.  The paper bags will be able to be reused as well to make more sheet mulches.  Dad and Jamie think I'm a bit nuts but I'm having a ball.  Getting my exercise after school building healthy soil in the front yard.  I'm not sure what we will grow there but my vision is to have all kinds of plants up there (maybe transplant some trees from the backyard, perennial flowers, ferns, and Dad wants to add more berries too.)



Lol if they think you're nuts I'd list that as a good thing. You're setting the example! It's one thing think 'gee people should really learn to garden' and another entirely to start learning and set the example yourself. I'm excited to see it when I get home!

Lorianne Haslehurst wrote:
The potatoes sound interesting Cam.  Auntie Lisa said she loves to grow them.  It has been getting crazy cold up here so I've not put any veggies in the garden yet.  Maybe this weekend.  I'm still not sure what we're putting in there.  I'll let you know!



Yeah the weather here has been up and down. Some days wearing a sweater and hovering around 10C, then the next day we can have 33C and everyone is sluggish. We're looking forward to some more even weather. I think we're also in a bit of a draught here so water use is down quite a bit as we're on a well. Still lots of rainwater from the catchment and lots in the well, but planning ahead incase it lasts a while. We've had two storms bypass us now with no rain falling here and it looks for the next while it'll just be sunny.  The potatoes should ne all set in the mulched area though, it stays moist deep down for a very long time.

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