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How do you grind sprouted grain?  RSS feed

 
R Scott
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Location: Kansas Zone 6a
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I want to make sprouted bread, but can't find a suitable way to grind the wet grain. Some say to dry it and run it through your regular mill--that is fine for a novelty but not sustainable for daily bread for a large family or community from time or energy IMO. Some say to run it through a meat grinder, but that makes for a really rough texture--fine if you are using it like oatmeal in bread (still mostly plain flour) but doesn't make for an appetizing loaf. Some say to use a food processor, which is fine for one loaf but doesn't work when you make 6 loaves per batch.

Anybody have any tips or tricks I am missing?
 
John Elliott
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Have you tried an immersion blender? I've recently discovered that these are far more versatile than upright kitchen-top blenders and food processors. I have one for in the kitchen for pureeing soups and salsas and another one out in the garden shed for non-food uses. You can size reduce all sorts of solids as long as it is suspended in enough water so that the particles can easily get drawn up into the blades and shredded. You get a good size one, and you can use it in a 5 gallon bucket -- a lot faster than trying to do batches in a food processor.
 
Dale Hodgins
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John Elliott wrote:Have you tried an immersion blender? I've recently discovered that these are far more versatile than upright kitchen-top blenders and food processors. I have one for in the kitchen for pureeing soups and salsas and another one out in the garden shed for non-food uses. You can size reduce all sorts of solids as long as it is suspended in enough water so that the particles can easily get drawn up into the blades and shredded. You get a good size one, and you can use it in a 5 gallon bucket -- a lot faster than trying to do batches in a food processor.


John, these things showed up on our shores in the 80s, only 20 years behind Europe. I've seen you mention yours before. You must be quite enamored with it. I bought an old one for $3 at a yard sale and used it to mix paint. Nothing gets the lumps out of free yard sale paint like an immersion blender. I wonder if Tim Allen or Bob Vila ever tried that ?

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R Scott
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Location: Kansas Zone 6a
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That I have not tried... yet. THANKS!

My wife just ordered a new one for making soap, she burned up the cheapie. It will make soap trace in a minute when the handmixer took 30 and by hand took an hour.

I keep thinking to order a commercial one, big enough to use in the 5 gallon stock pot, but I am not enamored enough with them to spend real money yet. If it will make a good 100% sprouted loaf, that will change
 
John Elliott
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Dale Hodgins wrote:
John, these things showed up on our shores in the 80s, only 20 years behind Europe. I've seen you mention yours before. You must be quite enamored with it.


Nothing quite like a good tool that gets the job done. Now if they don't take it off the market because of too many dim-bulbs sticking their fingers into the blades.....
 
Jordan Lowery
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I sprout in bulk and dry it. Most if the time in five to ten pound batches. We also do this for making beer so we get double duty out of it. I make 15-30 loafs at a time in the wood fired oven and I need lots of dough. I can't be fussing around with kitchen tools. After sprouted in food grade buckets with perforated bottoms and sides(dipped into fresh water and drained a few times a day) this draws air Into the center so they don't rot. Once sprouted it's laid out to dry and depending on weather it's usually a day or so.

I like to do three or four buckets at a time and only do that every now and then. I'd rather not do this task once a week or less. Doing three buckets is just as easy as doing one.

After it's dried it goes through my stone mill and onto fermentation.
 
R Scott
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Location: Kansas Zone 6a
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How do you dry it in a day?

Maybe I need to get my butt in gear and build that fodder system--I could use it for both us and the animals.
 
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