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Black Radish throat Cure  RSS feed

 
David Livingston
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Location: Anjou ,France
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I just tried making a syrup from Radin noire or Black radish worked a treat for my sore throat .
Peel the raddish, chop finely, cover with sugar, leave for a couple of hours ,use within a couple of days ,store in the fridge .
Simple

David

Eddited once as I am crap at spelling
 
Steven Feil
Posts: 242
Location: South Central Idaho
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What was the underlying cause of the sore thoat (root cause)? Did you make this solely to treat the symptom (pain) or to treat that root cause (cure/support your body so it can heal itself)?
 
David Livingston
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Location: Anjou ,France
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I had a cold /sore throat , Now I dont . It soothed my throat made it easy to sleep let my body recover fight the germs .
Try it yourself


David
 
Victor Skaggs
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I've grown the Spanish black round radish a few times. It is an interesting addition to stews, used like potato or turnip. Combine with strong tastes as it does have the strong cabbage-family taste.

This is a crop worth getting to know, for organic gardeners, etc. I read that it is good for gall bladder, and for those who've had it removed.

It's quite productive, the radishes are huge (softball size is normal), the above-ground part is good mulch/compost, and it does well in bad weather (such as the over-abundance of rain and clouds with insufficient sunlight suffered here in WV summer 2013).

The tops are large, more like Brassicas such as broccoli or cabbage than common radishes.
 
Steven Feil
Posts: 242
Location: South Central Idaho
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Victor Skaggs wrote:the above-ground part is good mulch/compost, and it does well in bad weather (such as the over-abundance of rain and clouds with insufficient sunlight
Would this be a good one to grow in waste places and move the vegetative parts to the compost or mulch areas? Is it drought tolerant?
 
David Livingston
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Location: Anjou ,France
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In my experiance it is not drought tolerant and will bolt given the slightest oppertunity .
I usually have it raw as a starter with grated carrot and a bit of tameri

David
 
Victor Skaggs
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Steven Feil wrote:
Victor Skaggs wrote:the above-ground part is good mulch/compost, and it does well in bad weather (such as the over-abundance of rain and clouds with insufficient sunlight
Would this be a good one to grow in waste places and move the vegetative parts to the compost or mulch areas? Is it drought tolerant?


Not good for drought. It did well here last summer where it was so cloudy many things wouldn't ripen, such as tomatoes.

Must have loose soil. I've only grown it in the garden which is fertile.
 
Devon Olsen
Posts: 1066
Location: SE Wyoming -zone 4
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i have grown black spanish round radishes, last summer actually, on hugelkultur beds in cheyenne wy with very little care as i live 200 miles away, they not only survived but were one of my best yielding crops among all the uncared for plants growing down there, most bolted and formed seed early as they were never harvested but i harvested about a dozen perhaps a month ago after a week of -20F, the tops had mostly died at that point, but they were big, tasty from what ive heard (havent cooked any up myself as of yet) and in my opinion did excellent considering the amount of care they recieved
one that bolted on the hand constructed section of the hugelkultur bed was probably two softballs large, if not three, but thats a guess from what i could see aboveground, i did not pull it as i wish for all the bolted radishes to decompose in place and form deep thick plugs of organic matter in the soil
very satisfied and even proud of the black spanish round radish and look forward to growing more next year, will hopefully see a few volunteers from all the ones that bolted as well
 
John Merrifield
Posts: 92
Location: West Virginia 6a Avgerage Rainfall 54" est. Average snowfall 36"
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OP, I've used the same trick with onion. You may try the radish and onion together.
 
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