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I think it will work. Question on if I am wrong for composting cigarette buds

 
Whitney Segura
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Yeah, that should work okay, even though I have not tried it myself.

One thing, however, that I have successfully composted, and a lot of, is actual cigarette buds. They take a little longer to break down, but eventually, they do and turn into nice compost.

Or, am I wrong about doing that, and hurting the plant's due to the contents of cigarettes? Does anyone know?

- Whitney
 
John Elliott
pollinator
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I don't see a problem; there's nothing in them that fungi can't break down.
 
David Williams
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They will decompose being organic , the filters are not likely to if they are synthetic , i would be hesitant to do so because of the amount of chemicals used in manufacture, and certainly wouldn't use on food products (Am a smoker myself) i don't think personally there is enough organic matter to warrant using them , and certainly too many chemical unknowns to be sure of complete breakdown
 
John Polk
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Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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I smoke myself, and don't see a problem, with the exception of the filters.

I do, however, smoke American Spirits, which have no added chemicals, and I smoke non-filter cigarettes.
Essentially, I am composting a natural plant leaf, with a minimal amount of delicate paper.

The basic principal behind composting is that "If it once lived, it will decompose".

I believe that most filters are made predominantly from things that never lived.
As a side note, several years ago, Marlboro recalled about 10 million of cartons (there was about a week when their products were absent from store shelves) due to a 'new' filter that had some questionable contents. I am certain that they did not go into the dumpster...they probably got flooded onto the markets in Africa and Asia, where nobody could realistically attempt to sue them.

By the way, with cigarettes, it is called a 'butt' (as in 'the butt end'). 'Buds' are from another smoking product.



 
David Williams
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In Australia most filter mediums are fiberglass, with the exception of "Benson and Hedges" that use cotton, 98% of the tobacco sold in Aus uses artificial drying and curing methods and NOT the original fermenting process of days gone by... If you have a natural product then one could easily make it into a natural pesticide if one was to require one .... Yes all natural products do decompose even Uranium given time ... I'd use it for compost on trees and other non edibles.... tho wouldn't use it on a vegie patch without 100% knowledge of it's contents
Peace and Love Dave oxoxox
 
wanda hermann
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there is a virus called "Tabakmosaikvirus" in German ( sorry quick google didn't give me an english name) which also likes tomatoes that you could get into your soil with the cigarettes theoretically.
At least during my apprenticeship as a gardener we weren't allowed to smoke in the greenhouses with tomatoes because of it.
So if you don't plan to grow tomatoes or tobacco you should be fine.
 
Chris Kott
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Location: Toronto, Ontario
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It is known as the Mosaic virus where I have read up on it, and can be a problem for all nightshade family plants, including tobacco, tomatoes, potatoes, and the eponymous nightshade.

So just like you don't mulch plants of the same family with eachothers' plant wastes so that diseases and dormant molds/fungi (even pest insect eggs) particular to the family aren't transferred to the soil and, after, to successive crops, you will want to avoid using composted tobacco on nightshades. I have been told that you don't even want people smoking around your nightshade crops for fear of infection.

This, in addition to using crops with different needs and nutrient profiles so as to not deplete the soil every year of the same nutrients, is one of the main reasons for traditional crop rotation.

-CK
 
2017 Permaculture Design Course at Wheaton Labs
http://richsoil.com/pdc
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