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finally made use of the 250gl tank

 
Leah Sattler
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I really wanted a water storage container but the previous contents were just tooo icky. so pegleg peggy got a house instead! she will be having babies soon and needed to be seperated, especially from the mischevious 2yr old pony. she can't get around great because of an old injury and I will henceforth probably keep her put up anyway so she doesn't wear her good legs out trying to browse and fight for her share of feed. she is a sweet girl and didnt' ask for her lot in life and I want her to have an easy time of it as much as possible. her good front leg probably won't hold out for a normal goat lifespan because of the addded stress making up for the other front leg which operates only as a 'prop'.

 
charles c. johnson
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good job
 
Gwen Lynn
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I think it's great! Turned out to be a very useful item. Nice work! Dh gives it 2 thumbs up!
 
Leah Sattler
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the only thing I am not going to like about it is that it will have to be primarily a winter house. with the opaque plastic it will be like a green house in the summer there isn't really any shady spot to put it with the goats except waaaaaay down in the back. but its not unusual to need a hospital pen up near the house under the trees so I suppose it will end up there.

I can't wait to get started making a hay feeder out of the cage it came in. it will be awesome! pony proof! their little equine faces won't be able to get into it so well adn they will have to nibble around the edges. They are such pigs and destroy the hay I put out for the goats........and they aint exactly in need of extra food.......they look like the kiddos "my little pony" figurines as it is. the goats will be able to reach in and get they hay without climbing on it and ruining it too. ....well er...this is all working out great in my mind...I guess time will tell 
 
Gwen Lynn
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Now that you mention it, those ponies are looking a little Thelwellian, aren't they? 
 
Leah Sattler
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chunky monkeys! I kicked them out back yesterday. I had them up in front to feed them hay during the snowy wintery stuff but I swear I could see them swelling before my very eyes while pigging out and monopolozing the hay. I think they need to be out there on the winter graze to keep them from exploding!
 
Gwen Lynn
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Puffy ponies, no doubt! Putting them back in a situation where they have to move around more and work a little harder to get food can only be good for them.
 
Leah Sattler
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I am convinced that ponies, pygmy goats and Charlene can live on air alone!
 
Gwen Lynn
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Yeah...the ponies, the pygmies, Charlene...and ME! The "air" diet is what I need. Might have to throw in a little water every now and then. Unless it's humid! 
 
Joel Hollingsworth
pollinator
Posts: 2103
Location: Oakland, CA
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Leah Sattler wrote:
the only thing I am not going to like about it is that it will have to be primarily a winter house. with the opaque plastic it will be like a green house in the summer 


I bet it would help to paint a length of e.g. downspout pipe black, and fit it to the screw-top opening as a solar chimney: the convection would move a lot of air, especially during warmer weather. Piling dirt and/or straw would probably also help out a lot.

Unless the other goats have access to the outside, I could imagine using the cattle panel near the tank as a trellis (for curucubits?) over the summer: the tank will block her from eating the vines right where shade & transpiration are most needed.
 
Leah Sattler
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awesome idea joel! just getting some type of air movement through it (without making it leaky) would probably at least extend the amount of time it could be used. growing anything where the goats might have access to it is gonna be hard though! they can and will contort themselves and push things around to get that one bit of nibble!  i like the idea of burying it somehow....right now i jsut can't figure out where it would be feasable to do so. I have a little hill down to the pasture buts its mostly chat and rock. a realy PITA to dig in thats for sure.
 
Ken Peavey
steward
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Location: FL
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Joel beat me to it.  I was gonna say remove the cap for a roof vent.

Buried in hay/straw bales the thing will keep an animal warm in the winter.

If you have a blowtorch and/or a file, it would only take a few moments to smooth out the cut marks at the edges of the door.
 
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