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Rose Hive Method

 
James Colbert
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Has anyone seen this type of hive? It is in may ways a hybrid between warre and perone hives. I object to the use of frames but and would use top bars instead but for the most part it seems like a good method. I would love to get some input from people with experience on this.





 
Patrick Mann
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Location: Seattle, WA, USA
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Isn't this the same as a foundationless Lang using all mediums? Or an odd-sized Warre, for that matter?
The only difference I can see is how it is managed (adding empty boxes into the brood nest area).
 
James Colbert
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Well management and simplicity of design. All the boxes are the same and replacing the frames with top bars would make it even more bee friendly no? I was thinking of a Warre/ Perone Hybrid when I came across this. It seems to benefit from the greater size compared to the Warre, but is more modular and allows for brood expansion more like a Warre. I believe in one of the above links he state that the bees can fill one of those boxes in a week! Of course those are under ideal conditions but sill that is a lot of honey. You can super or nadir depending on your desired involvement and intervention levels and it is very easy to create additional hives using this method. Can you find some downsides. It seems as if the brood expansion option would allow for even greater honey production than the Perone maybe even more than commercial hives.
 
Martin Miljkovic
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Hi,
this type of the hive is common where I live. Not many beekeepers use it but there are some things that I would suggest fir this type of the hive:

1.Queen excluder
you need it during the preparation of the honey flow for a lot of reasons. Some might be: honey without brood, ability to know where your queen is when you take the honey from the hive. If you do not know you may destroy her.

2. There is a pattern of brood and foundation (drawn and not drawn) that must be respected in order to have bees in the new brood boxes.
Complex matter but logical.

3.There are patterns of rotation of brood, honey, empty wax that you need to know in order to maximize the potential of the hive.

4. This type of the hive is easier to manage than most others
due to the facts that all of the parts of the hive are of same dimensions.


 
Kevin Hedrick
Posts: 21
Location: S.E. South Dakota
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I think I prefer the premise of this hive. To me, it is a langstroth with medium boxes that prohibits the use of a queen excluder to allow the bees to make use of their most natural and efficient brood patter. I personally see no difference in what type of frame structure is used. It would seem that if you are using bars as opposed frames you are still persuading the bees to make comb in a certain fashion. If you have ever read any of the theories of langstroth or his studies in the design (Which date back to the 1800's), you have probably found the frames to be efficient by design for the bees. The Rose hive is, in my humble opinion, a very nonrestrictive langstroth, which takes advantage of supers as brood space as well as catering to the bee's natural shape of brood chamber, the rose shape. This is why it is called the rose method. The queens most efficient means of moving from comb to comb is that which is found in nature. In nature a bees space most closely resembles a skep, or a cork hive as I have seen from other posts here. The hollow of a tree.. The natural swarm is also an indicator of this "Rose" in shape. The cluster is easily formed and not restricted in the shape of a triangle, square, trapezoid or whatever man can come up with to hold the bugs.. I think the rose hive method holds merit, for the bees, and also in efficiency for our needs. I think our goal in beekeeping among permies is generally all the same. In states like mine, I must make it as easy as possible for bees to be inspected by government authorities, as they require me to comply with these regulations. I cannot own a hive that does not have removable frames. If I am found in violation, the local governing authority can seize my property, fine and possibly jail me.. I use the rose method to allow the bees the best chance in recovering from our governments intrusions... Bars are susceptible to breakage upon inspection and that doesn't enable the best fighting chance for my bees..
 
James Colbert
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I think the simplicity of the design allows you to get the best of all world depending on your management methods and level of involvement. You could treat it like a large Warre (which is what I was looking for examples of when I came across the Rose Hive), or more like a Perone. It seems potentially superior to both because of the ability to create a massive amount of brood. It also seems to make splitting hives a lot easier. Now ideally a big brood and lots of forage make for a happy bee keeper and happy bees. I am going to build one of these this year and see how it turns out.
 
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