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Andrew Winsor
Posts: 58
Location: Aberdeen, WA
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The "Three Amigos" Garden Pack
"For species successionism of friendly fungi in the garden, we recommend using these three garden allies: in concert, the Garden Oyster (Hypsizygus ulmarius), the Garden Giant (Stropharia rugoso-annulata) and the Shaggy Mane (Coprinus comatus). They can be placed in the garden for the benefit of vegetables and for improving soil quality. And, gourmet mushrooms flourish throughout the seasons to create the best of edible landscapes!"


Plug Spawn Kit
"We’ve assembled a selection of critical items for your outdoor log and stump cultivation projects, at a special price.

Kit includes:
A 5⁄16” steel drill bit for use with our Mushroom Plug Spawn. Includes a stop-collar with an adjustable set screw to customize drilling depth.
A sturdy wood-handled mallet with a solid rubber head, perfect for tapping plugs into logs and stumps.
A pound of our soy-based Sealing Wax.
A 1" brush for applying wax."

MycoGrow™ Soluble--2x 1 oz
MycoGrow™ Soluble is similar to Plant Success™ Tabs but is more concentrated, containing more spores and more species, plus other beneficial organisms. Consisting of powdered spore mass rather than tablets, MycoGrow™ Soluble is great for adding to rooting media or commercial potting soils. Sold in one pound and one ounce increments. An ounce is sufficient to treat 125-250 plants covering approximately 250 square feet. - See more at: http://www.fungi.com/product-detail/product/mycogrow-soluble-1-oz.html#sthash.oNbDtZ6v.dpuf


Pearl Oyster Plug Spawn--Approx. 100 Plugs
Skill Level: 1/5
Fruiting Temperature: 55–75° F
Ideal Wood Types: alder, maple, oak, aspen, poplar, beech, birch, elm

Pleurotus ostreatus is probably the most common edible mushroom found on hardwoods. Growing on alder, cottonwood, poplar, oak, birch, beech, aspen and many other hardwoods, our aggressive strain is renowned for its productivity. Hardwood logs and stumps can be used for inoculation; after incubating the logs may be partially buried, horizontally-oriented, to conserve water during fruiting.
 
Florian Kreisky
Posts: 57
Location: Austria, Central Europe, USDA-Zone 6b
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"For species successionism of friendly fungi in the garden, we recommend using these three garden allies: in concert, the Garden Oyster (Hypsizygus ulmarius), the Garden Giant (Stropharia rugoso-annulata) and the Shaggy Mane (Coprinus comatus). They can be placed in the garden for the benefit of vegetables and for improving soil quality. And, gourmet mushrooms flourish throughout the seasons to create the best of edible landscapes!"


The H. ulmarius you bought is actually some kind of Oyster, most likely Pleurotus ostreatus or P. pulmonarius

Hypsizygus ulmarius looks quite different as you can see in this link
http://www.mushroomexpert.com/hypsizygus_ulmarius.html

It's edible, but by far not amongst the best mushrooms i tried
 
Andrew Winsor
Posts: 58
Location: Aberdeen, WA
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Florian Kogseder wrote:The H. ulmarius you bought is some kind of Oyster, most likely Pleurotus ostreatus or P. pulmonarius

Hypsizygus ulmarius looks quite different as you can see in this link
http://www.mushroomexpert.com/hypsizygus_ulmarius.html

It's edible, but by far not amongst the best mushrooms i tried


Yeah, I may not like all the mushrooms in my garden, I am most hoping they help my plants grow better, and I will be settings up a Pearl Oyster log or 2,
Each new year, I will be ordering more species of seeds, trees, and fungi. I always have to choose something, this way each new year is interesting in its own way.
 
Florian Kreisky
Posts: 57
Location: Austria, Central Europe, USDA-Zone 6b
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Sorry, my comment on edibility was actually on the real "Elm-Oyster", Hypsizigus ulmarius. The Pleurotus sp. you got is a much better edible and will be quite similar to the other Oyster you bought


How are you planning to grow the species you got?
 
Andrew Winsor
Posts: 58
Location: Aberdeen, WA
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Florian Kogseder wrote:Sorry, my comment on edibility was actually on the real "Elm-Oyster", Hypsizigus ulmarius. The Pleurotus sp. you got is a much better edible and will be quite similar to the other Oyster you bought


thank you for the update, I am going to try all the mushrooms in my garden.


Florian Kogseder wrote:How are you planning to grow the species you got?


For the Garden Mushrooms, I was going to do something similar to this image


Which the way I understand it is to place the mushroom spawn before you do your last layer of mulch in a sheet mulch.
I already order my kit so I have 20 days to put it into my bed, which would put me at the start of February, which is a bit soon. (both on my project time table and on the recommended start time of March). Hopefully I can store them in the dark garage for 45 days instead of 20.. Oh I really don't know what I should do. I wont really be ready to put them into my beds for another 45 days. I messed the whole "Live Item" and "no in door flushing first".

For the Pearl Oyster plugs, I bought the Plug starting kit, and will follow the instructions, I do have a cottonwood stump that was only cut down 2 weeks ago, so I am worried if I can put the Pearl Oyster Plugs in there or not. its about 3.5 feet across. I am waiting at least 4 weeks to insert my Plugs (into the stump and logs) so the food anti-fungal cycle ends.
 
Florian Kreisky
Posts: 57
Location: Austria, Central Europe, USDA-Zone 6b
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For the Garden Mushrooms, I was going to do something similar to this image



This should work perfect, especially for the Shaggy Manes and the Stropharia, which naturally grow in similar environments. I tried something like this with Pleurotus columbinus once, but I didn't have any luck. Maybe the genetics you got there are better suited for the job, but naturally all these Pleurotus species grow on trees, logs and stumps


Hopefully I can store them in the dark garage for 45 days instead of 20.. Oh I really don't know what I should do. I wont really be ready to put them into my beds for another 45 days. I messed the whole "Live Item" and "no in door flushing first".



In my experience storage for up to some months is no problem at all. Just keep them dark and cool, the fridge would be perfect.
I successfully inoculated new substrates with spawn I had stored for up to 9 months!
In my experience indoor flushing is no problem at all, the mycelium will just need 2-3 days time to change from fruiting into growing mode again


I am waiting at least 4 weeks to insert my Plugs (into the stump and logs) so the food anti-fungal cycle ends.



For logs from most trees 2-12 weeks after cutting is perfect, but with stumps you should wait a bit longer, 6 weeks at least
 
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