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permaculture advocate in Zimbabwe - too little/too much rain

 
pollinator
Posts: 221
Location: Zimbabwe
81
greening the desert
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We continued the talk on success and our conclusion to help us understand where we currently are, which will  help us determine what we need to do to achieve our goals follows:

The quality of life in general is deteriorating and not much effort has made significant progressive change at a family level. E.g. the investment  made in education has limited benefit to the direct growth or improvement of the local society. Income generating projects in homesteads are an expence rather than a profit. It all comes down to failure in assessing whether an action is beneficial or not. There is also lack of enough knowledge on alternative lifestyles or income generating activities.

The measurable goals and objectives we came up with are
1) creating a system where there are high chances of getting beneficial results from any effort exerted I.e. concentrating on effectiveness.

2)building an environment as fair as possible, with each person getting a reward/ benefit for his/ her effort.
 
Rufaro Makamure
pollinator
Posts: 221
Location: Zimbabwe
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greening the desert
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We have had our first monthly review of the year. Things are promising. We isolated the chicken project, because it is one project my mum is deciding whether to continue or not and  since we bought most of the feed already we were able to appreciate better the inflow from selling chomolia. This alone takes care of all the expenses (excluding the chicken feed). We need to keep this up in the next months, with some improvement on other areas, it will be safe to say we would have succeeded in creating a retirement for mother independent from the need to financially rely on extra support for basic survival (with all things being equal). This will mark the beginning of fulfilling her wish. The first legacy that she can leave is a place that can take care of itself.

We defined specific goals and we both have separate responsibilities for the coming month, to help with accountability. Mother has to decide how the chicken project will be continued, whether she thinks now is a good time to keep this number of chickens or not. I have to come up with a way of planting chomolia suckers in the heat without the need to replant, as we spent too much time planting chomolia in the past year and we still are. Both the chickens and chomolia planting has made so much effort from last year be in vain and we want to change this.
 
Rufaro Makamure
pollinator
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Location: Zimbabwe
81
greening the desert
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We have won with the nursing of chomolia suckers. There is nothing new and special we did, except to focus more on our probable solution and put all our attention while trying it out. We would grow suckers directly into beds and it was normal and accepted for the leaves on the suckers to brown, leaving only the tiny central leaf in it's forming stage. This would keep the plant alive until it formed its roots.

Sometime last year or even before I tried a nursery but either the things would dry up or be destroyed by our dogs. This time l reserved enough time to monitor and attend to the suckers and we succeeded. With the new method, most leaves remain green and a few turn yellow. The space that needs watering is so small making it very manageable.

So far the ones we put as an experiment are showing signs of life and the method has already been adopted at the plot. We will wait for a month before transplanting and in the meantime we will work on the soil within the beds.
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Successful experiment
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Using tree shade as a micro climate
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We made a shade using grass
 
Rufaro Makamure
pollinator
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It has been raining consistently since the end of January. We decided to start with the front yard, which now had so much weeds coming through the stones that I put earlier. We did the same thing, talking about exactly what we want to achieve and we want
  • a portion just after the lawn that does not grow anything, with minimum maintenance
  • Lawn and flower area that stays green with minimum watering requirements
  • .  

    So again I am adding more stone which I am getting from yet another pile of rubble that was dumped by the road side. I want to first try to achieve weed suppression using most available and least costly material and also a pile of rubble along the side of the road is a sure attraction for dumping of garbage in the future. I decided to first put cardboard boxes, also using waste material, to stop the weeds for a while. If this time it doesn't work, the next step is to buy quarry stone, which seems to be working just fine on other people's yards.  And this time is the best time to see this, the weeds we pulled out end of last week are already coming out. As or the lawn area, we have decided to put succulents in place of the lawn and the flowers as they are more drought resistant. We have not picked on the actual plants we will use.  

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    Newly dumped rubble
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    Weeding in progress
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    Weeds are already growing back just days after weeding
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    Laid some cardboard under the rubble
     
    Never trust an airline that limits their passengers to one carry on iguana. Put this tiny ad in your shoe:
    Binge on 17 Seasons of Permaculture Design Monkeys!
    http://permaculture-design-course.com
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