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What is it.... the game! Post unknown objects to ID... and to stump others!  RSS feed

 
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How loose is the lid? Does it seemlikeit might be watertight if it swelled after soaking? If so, I'd guess a early washing machine.
 
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Allison Jones wrote:saw this at the flea market today

the circle is a loosely latched lid about 1' in diameter.



This isn't a super old-school compost tumbler, is it? 😂
 
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A drum for tanning leather.
 
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All good possibilities so far. Something in my old geezer brain remembers seeing a device like this that shucked corn on grandpa's farm.  
 
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Mike Barkley wrote:All good possibilities so far. Something in my old geezer brain remembers seeing a device like this that shucked corn on grandpa's farm.  


How would you shuck corn with it? Fill it with water and turn?


 
Mike Barkley
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I used the wrong word. Not shucked ... de-husked.
 
Pearl Sutton
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Mike Barkley wrote:I used the wrong word. Not shucked ... de-husked.


What is the difference? I thought it was the same? I'm not up on corn growing though....
 
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I went back and looked more closely, but unfortunately I couldn't find any label or even a price tag.  I got some more pictures, though.


Only one end has the circular profile; the end with the crank handle (previous pic) is left hexagonal

detail of the opening.  It actually slipped out of position when I turned the crank, so it's not a tight seal these days

looks like some water stains, so probably wasn't filled with water, because in that case the entire thing would be water stained, I think?

inside of one end; the points where the axle mounts to the ends.  The other side is basically identical.
 
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Pearl Sutton wrote:

Mike Barkley wrote:I used the wrong word. Not shucked ... de-husked.


What is the difference? I thought it was the same? I'm not up on corn growing though....



I think it's a 'regional' thing and can be interchanged.

With a name like 'Pearl' perhaps it's pertinent to note: oysters are shucked.

...........

I agree with Daniel, looks like an early washing machine:

A. The round lid appears to have had a rubber gasket to stop it from leaking - perhaps it's loose now because the rubber has perished.
B. Water stains would typically only be where water laid for a period of time.
C. The inside screw marks look to be caused by moisture.
D. The horizontal slats inside would help agitate clothing.

??

 
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possibly a huge butter churn?  I think there would be some sign of milk or cream fat residue on the inside though?

All of the images of wooden crank washing machines I found did not have a horizontal barrel like shown above and only a few of the butter churns did...some looked as large as the one you've posted maybe.
...and then, I'm not absolutely sure these two images are of butter churns even though that's where they were listed? sometimes google is mistaken

 
Mike Barkley
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   Pearl Sutton wrote:

       Mike Barkley wrote:
       I used the wrong word. Not shucked ... de-husked.


   What is the difference? I thought it was the same? I'm not up on corn growing though....



I think it's a 'regional' thing and can be interchanged.  



Looked it up. Both words mean the same thing. I was cornfused.

 
Pearl Sutton
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Mike Barkley wrote: Looked it up. Both words mean the same thing. I was cornfused.


Ah ha! You had me totally cornfounded :D

As far as the turning thing:
I think it's way too big and uncleanable to be a butter churn, the door isn't good for getting butter out of it
Too water damageable to be a compost tumbler, it would rot as fast as the compost did
Washing machine is possible, how do you drain out the water though? Cycling water through really often is a major part of laundry
Leather tanning drum is really very possible, leather dyeing even more possible  How leather is made  about 3/4 of the way down that page it says

Drum dyeing is the process of immersing the leather in the dye and tumbling it in a rotating drum to ensure maximum penetration of the dye throughout the hide.

So cycling water through isn't done as often..

Interesting! I hope someone can answer this one authoritatively! For now, I'm awarding an apple to Allison Jones for stumping us!! Keep the ideas coming folks, I'm curious... :D
 
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The lack of any real staining inside makes me think nothing to do with dyeing leather.  Maybe just a hand crank barrel to soften leather after it has been tanned...  but still no real staining.

The circular profile on the one end was put there on purpose... But what purpose ?  I can't believe it was to help hold it together or the other end would have it as well....

I guessing it might be for separating grain from chaff...  Still that round profile is baffling.

Good one Allison!
 
Kenneth Elwell
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thomas rubino wrote:The lack of any real staining inside makes me think nothing to do with dyeing leather.  Maybe just a hand crank barrel to soften leather after it has been tanned...  but still no real staining.

The circular profile on the one end was put there on purpose... But what purpose ?  I can't believe it was to help hold it together or the other end would have it as well....

I guessing it might be for separating grain from chaff...  Still that round profile is baffling.

Good one Allison!



I'd put money on the circular end being for a flat belt drive, you'd only need one.
 
Pearl Sutton
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Kenneth Elwell wrote:

I'd put money on the circular end being for a flat belt drive, you'd only need one.


You beat me to it :) Belt or a wheel to stabilize it.
I'd join you in the putting money on it.

Thomas Rubino: I disagree with grain from chaff, you'd end up with a mess that was an utter PITA to get out of the barrel. I had a compost tumbler shaped something like that at one point, it was damn near impossible to unload anything from it. if someone was doing something like grain, I can't imagine they'd not make it easier to deal with.
 
Judith Browning
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Maybe?  I couldn't give up on a butter churn...many, many types out there and I think this is it...







 
thomas rubino
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I think Judith has found it !   I vote we give her an apple or 3
 
Pearl Sutton
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YAY! Apple for Judith!!  :D

I wonder how you are supposed to clean those... Looks like a toxin factory to me...
 
Judith Browning
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Pearl Sutton wrote:YAY! Apple for Judith!!  

I wonder how you are supposed to clean those... Looks like a toxin factory to me...



Thank you Pearl

I think the lid is big enough to reach in with hands and pull out the finished butter but I don't know how they are cleaned and what I read about the larger one is that it holds twenty gallons! that would be twenty gallons of cream, a lot of cows!

When my husband was coopering he made a traditional upright wooden churn, coopered so that it did not leak and it had the plunger type deal with cross pieces of wood.  They could be cleaned with hot cold water of course but being wood there would always be a certain amount of cream soaking into it that could not be removed I would think?  I've only done the shake in a jar method.

I should have checked with my guy...he says folks used cold water to clean the churn so the fats didn't coagulate and many times just kept the churn going all the time.  Most was soured cream butter...is that clabbored butter as opposed to sweet butter?
 
Pearl Sutton
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Yes, that's clabbered buttered, when it's starts with slightly soured cream.
and thinking on it, if you didn't clean it, you'd be reinoculating it with the right bacteria.
 
Kenneth Elwell
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Sweet!!
I've learned three things today:
Why "sweet cream butter" is called that...
About clabber... what is clabber
and also why there's a leavening called "Clabber Girl"!

incidentally, we've always been a Rumford baking powder family, since Benjamin Thompson (Count Rumford) is a cousin of mine... ;-p
 
Pearl Sutton
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Kenneth Elwell wrote:Sweet!!
I've learned three things today:
Why "sweet cream butter" is called that...
About clabber... what is clabber
and also why there's a leavening called "Clabber Girl"!

incidentally, we've always been a Rumford baking powder family, since Benjamin Thompson (Count Rumford) is a cousin of mine... ;-p



YAY! Always learn more!! That's why I love this game, I learn SO much! It's a random walk down every subject known to the net :)
If I buy baking powder, honestly, I buy what's cheap :) Last I bought was a no-name restaurant pack, a pound or so. Never thought about brands of baking powder. I use baking soda and acid if I don't have any, doesn't bother me any at all.
Things I never thought of... Cool!
Keep them coming folks!! :D
 
Judith Browning
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kenneth wrote: incidentally, we've always been a Rumford baking powder family, since Benjamin Thompson (Count Rumford) is a cousin of mine... ;-p



..... a cousin who's a count! How fun!

Rumford is the only brand baking powder we use because it has no aluminum.  
 
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