• Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

To espeliar or not to espeliar

 
Rob Sigg
Posts: 715
Location: PA-Zone 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I was wondering if anyone has any advice on espeliar fruit trees. My dilemma is this. I don't have a lot of land and the only areas where I can plant fruit trees is along our property line. I can't plant trees within 10 feet of that line because of zoning regulations. I was planning on training my fruit trees as a belgian fence, to get privacy, boundary and obviously it would not take up a lot of space. Running it parallel with the property line would mean I wouldn't overhang the line either so I can plant it closer to get more yard. The more and more I read though, it says that it is alot of work and of course requires heavy posts and wire to support everything which will not go over to well with the township or homeowners association. Is there a way I can train them flat without using the posts and wire?
 
Jordan Lowery
pollinator
Posts: 1528
Location: zone 7
12
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
all i can say is be prepared to to work on it for a few years before its even close to a living fence and producing a ton. if you are a patient person, it shouldn't be a hard project for you.

posts are only required for the first few years. if you get the training right and the right variety/rootstock it will stand on its own once mature.

 
Rob Sigg
Posts: 715
Location: PA-Zone 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
In your opinion is it more work to do espalier than to just keep pruning a dwarf tree? Im considering the really small ones instead of espalier but if they require the same amount of work then Ill go with the espalier if I can get it past the township.
 
Leah Sattler
Posts: 2603
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
blitz1976 wrote:
In your opinion is it more work to do espalier than to just keep pruning a dwarf tree?


I don't have any experience with espalier but I just can't imagine it being less work then a dwarf tree. my dwarf peach was never pruned. made a nice full bushy screen, wasn't over 10 feet at 8+ years old. I'm too lazy to train trees though!
 
Rob Sigg
Posts: 715
Location: PA-Zone 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Leah when did you first get significant fruit? I am buying 3-4 foot tall trees and just wondering how soon to expect any fruit. My understanding is that espalier will take much longer to get the same as a dwarf because of all the training. BTW do you have any pics of your dwarf? I want to show my wife what to expect and you just never know what you are going to get with google  Thanks!
 
Jordan Lowery
pollinator
Posts: 1528
Location: zone 7
12
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
its not really harder, it just takes a longer period of time to achieve the end goal. that's why i said if you are a patient person that helps.

what type of espalier are you planning on doing?
 
Rob Sigg
Posts: 715
Location: PA-Zone 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It makes sense because of the training. I would have loved to do a Belgian style so we can make a fence out of it. We like our privacy and to be perfectly blunt I am a little territorial  I love to share what I have but I don’t really like it when people use my land as a throughway  The reason for doing it this way was to keep it closer to the property line to allow for more space since it wouldn’t overhang the property line. With dwarfs I wont get as much space but I can at least keep them manageable. I want to start off with 2 apple and 2 pear variety.
 
Joel Hollingsworth
pollinator
Posts: 2103
Location: Oakland, CA
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I think a permaculturist's espalier has the option of being less rectilinear than the traditional Belgian variety.

Allowing the branches to follow more natural angles, and to occasionally arc slightly out of the ideal plane, might both reduce the effort needed and allow more of each year's growth to be acceptable.
 
  • Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic