• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

quiting smoking  RSS feed

 
charles c. johnson
Posts: 369
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
any herbal advice from anyone

I'm an addict. and i smoke 1 pack a day

 
Ken Peavey
steward
Posts: 2524
Location: FL
89
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Mint.
Use as you would chewing tobacco.
 
Joel Hollingsworth
pollinator
Posts: 2103
Location: Oakland, CA
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It's possible to graft a tobacco plant onto the roots of a tomato, producing nicotine-free tobacco leaves. (only the roots synthesize nicotine)

You can smoke these leaves while you go through withdrawal, which might break your association between smoking and nicotine, and will also allow you to gradually end the habit after dealing with the effects of stopping use of the drug.
 
Leah Sattler
Posts: 2603
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
no herbal advice here. only advice I have....get pregnant and refuse to endanger your baby (that might be kinda hard for you  ). Be depressed and isolate yourself for about 3 months. sell the car you smoked in. stay away from the things you did while smoking and the people you were around.  look back years later and think. why did I ever smoke those things? that is not the person i want to be. the longer you smoked the harder it will be I suppose.  bummer situation I know.
 
Gwen Lynn
Posts: 736
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I've been thinking a lot about your post, Charles. I am sorry to hear you are struggling with this. Personally, (IMO) you need love & support from you friends to help you. I do not think smokers should be vilified or treated as pariahs. Nor do I think they have anything to be ashamed of. Shaming people doesn't always help them quit. It just makes them feel bad, which is counterproductive. At least it has been for my husband. Case in point, the "truth" commercials. I understand they are done as a public service. It has been years since they quit advertising cigarettes on TV. When dh was trying to quit & one of those "truth" ads would come on, it would of course make him think about smoking, irritate him because of it's in-your-face attitude, and make him want a cigarette. Their point is well taken. We all know smoking is bad. I realize those commercials are targeted at younger smokers & if it helps fine. I'll still question whether it really helps or not.

My b-i-l smoked for over 40 years. He also drank. When he decided to quit, he had to quit both & he quit cold turkey. He was 56 at the time. Previous to that he'd tried to quit a number of times over the years. He even tried hypnosis, but it didn't work for him. He was told that he wasn't a good candidate for hypnosis in general.

My mother had 2 friends who smoked for decades. They did the hypnosis thing and it worked for them. Whether is was REALLY the hypnosis or just making the decision to quit via a placebo (such as hypnosis) to give them support, I don't know, but they never smoked again. They were in their early 50's.

My husband has smoked for 40 years. He is one of the sweetest guys you'd ever meet. We've been together for almost 25 years. He too has tried a number of times to quit. The brand he preferred (supposedly) had the lowest tar/nicotine content on the market. He tried the patch once, but even the lowest dosage of it delivered more nicotine than what he got from the cigs. The patch made him feel jittery and no wonder! He experienced the same thing with the nicotine gum & could only chew small sections of it at a time, with poor results. He got a prescription for chantix (Not cheap; even with insurance coverage). He had marginal results that weren't good enough to warrant the medication's cost.

At about the same time, the cost of cigarettes here really jumped. For a long time, it was cheaper to buy cigarettes here in "Indian Territory" than in most places of the US. When he crunched the #'s and realized just how much he was spending (just about the price of a monthly payment on a motorcycle) that helped more than anything else! So a new motorcycle was his reward for quitting cigarettes. He managed to avoid all smoking for quite a while. Unfortunately, job stress and other factors made it increasingly difficult to stay quit.

The main other factors were social drinking and playing in a band. My dh has played the guitar since he was a child. Like other musicians, playing in a band is something many strive for. Unfortunately, when he is in that environment, there are (of course) smokers & drinkers around. The band members (don't smoke) but many people who come & listen to them do smoke. Believe me, I would LOVE for him to stop associating with this group, for my own selfish reasons. I'd like him to be around as long as possible. He's 6 years older than me. It's his enjoyment. Even during the breaks the band has taken (which lasted a few months) didn't help. He was just depressed during that time. Friends and socialization are more important to some than they are to others. My dh really misses his friends when they aren't around.

He has gotten past cigarettes, but has substituted little cigars that are made with pipe tobacco. He doesn't smoke them as often & doesn't smoke at work anymore. Has he given smoking up completely? No. He struggles with his habits & the dependency every day. But at least he has cut down a lot. I've come to the realization that (for some) smoking isn't just about the nicotine addiction. It's something to do with their hands, oral fixation & there's a ritual involved/a habit. That's how it was for me. I don't believe I was ever addicted to nicotine when I smoked. I guess I was mostly a social-smoker. I have smoked off and on over the years, but never more than a 1/2 pack & I have always been able to just stop, whenever I wanted to. I think part of my ability to do that has something to do with my menthol preference. I only want to smoke menthol's. Non-menthol's are as repellent to me as menthol's are to people who don't smoke them. If I didn't have cigs of my own and there were no menthol smokers, I had no desire to bum cigs from anybody. Currently, I'm back in a non-smoking phase & hope to stay there. I have no desire to smoke, but I don't look back and think why did I ever smoke? I know why & I know I might even do it again, but my hope is that I won't.

I wish I had better advice for your Charles. I'm sympathetic and supportive. Some people can quit cold turkey, and some people can't. I don't know much about herbs & being as I've tried every dang herb I can lay my hands on to help me sleep (without much success), I question their efficacy. All I can say is try to stay positive, don't beat yourself up with negativity because I don't think it helps. I don't think saying quit because you have a wife and a child really works all that well. You have to quit for you. That's the best advice I have.
Hang in there! 
 
charles c. johnson
Posts: 369
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
any advice or stories about quiting helps. I am having a very hard time with it. I'll smoke when I'm sick. Last time I quit I made  it a few hour or so.  Then it was like an out of body experience, watching myself go in the store and buy them walk out side and light one up . It made me feel very weak. I haven't tried sense but I'm ready too
 
Chuck Freeman
Posts: 116
Location: Southcentral Alaska
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I quit smoking and dipping almost 20 years ago. I don't think there is anything that will lessen the withdrawal. It takes sheer willpower. Pick a time when you will have a couple of weeks when you won't have any outside stress or anything that takes any amount of concentration. You will probably have a hard time thinking straight and you will be very forgetful. Nicotine withdrawal is the pits you can't imagine how it will mess with you.  When you do toss them don't sit around find something physical to keep you busy. You are going to have a week of hell and another week of mostly hell. If you make the first two weeks you should have it beat. I'm not telling you this to scare you just prepare you.

Good luck don't let um beat you.
 
Wyatt Smith
Posts: 111
Location: Midwest zone 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I was a heavy smoker for 15 years.  I smoked Winston Light 100's at least a pack a day, sometimes 2.  I really loved smoking.  Unlike some people who try over and over to cut back or quit, I didn't even try until I was ready to fully commit.

When my residence changed I decided to finally quit smoking.  I cut down gradually for 1 week just to temper the cravings a little bit, then cold turkey after that.  There are two kinds of cravings physical and psychological.  The physical cravings are terrible for 3 days, horrible for 2 weeks, then they fade away forever.  The psychological cravings decline considerably after 1 month, are still significant after 6 months, occasional after 1 year, and never go away completely.  They get easier though.  It becomes a matter of thought catching, you just drive them out with any other thought; poof they are gone in a second.

What I did was start running.  Almost every time I craved a cigarette I got up and ran 1/2 mile.  Whenever I got my lungs huffing and puffing I wouldn't crave a cigarette.  After a run I would usually be OK for a while with no cravings.  I began to feel a lot better.  Everyone who quits notices how food tastes better and other nice things.  I had that going, plus I had more energy than ever before.  So I was feeling rewards for not smoking.  Running also shakes up your consciousness.  Whatever self-pity or whatever is going on, running pushes past it into some kind of free-association different than what happens sitting still. 

I stuck to one absolute rule:  Never smoke a single puff of tobacco again.
Never, not for any reason, not because you're drunk, not on a special occasion, not if there is a divorce or something terribly stressful.  Never.  Anyone who disobeys this rule will become addicted again.  All the effort you put into quitting, all the suffering you endure, it will all be for naught if you break this rule.
 
Caitlin Elder
Posts: 69
Location: Missoula
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have been a non smoker for the past 3 weeks, and I would have to say that the thing that has helped me the most is carrots.  When ever I was craving a smokey non fat treat(aka a cigarette) I found that munching on carrots helped reduce my cravings.  I also chewed alot of gum, especially when I was driving to help curb my cravings. 

On a side note - I have stopped hacking up nasty things from my lungs!
 
Joel Hollingsworth
pollinator
Posts: 2103
Location: Oakland, CA
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It is possible that fava beans will be helpful with physical cravings.

Fava beans contain L-dopa, and nicotine is dopaminergic (that is, it acts on the brain in some of the same ways that L-dopa does).

Two important differences are that inhaled nicotine enters your system all in a rush (especially prepared with ammonia, the way cigarette companies do, to cross the blood-brain barrier more easily), and that your body can break down (and otherwise moderate the effects of) natural L-dopa much more easily. Lastly, a pack of cigarettes easily contains a lethal dose of nicotine, while fava beans don't contain all that much L-dopa.

If you decide to taper off your usage, it might be good to roll your own for that time. It's much easier to control the amount of tobacco you use, and also hand-rolled cigarettes are not spiked at the tip the way commercial ones are. A spike of nicotine up front serves to train you to light up another; breaking that association with cigarettes that are the same the whole way through will probably help a little with the psychological aspects of addiction.
 
Happiness is not a goal ... it's a by-product of a life well lived - Eleanor Roosevelt. Tiny ad:
Book Review Grid
https://permies.com/wiki/31762/Book-Review-Grid
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!