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Save money with fermentation as medicine  RSS feed

 
John Saltveit
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Fermenting can help you save money when it is used as medicine. I think that one of the keys is the financial long run. My friends come over to my house and realize that my wife just made dinner that cost us $2.36 per person, but was tastier, healthier, and more interesting than what you could buy in a restaurant. We did have to learn to cook over time, but it was totally worth it. We probably saved $100 just that day for the meal. I don't mind doing the dishes because I realize what an amazing deal I'm getting. I read that sauerkraut has probiotics in it, which could prevent some of those $135, 723 visits to the hospital. Then I noticed that the corporate sauerkraut I was eating had sodium benzoate in it, which after brief research showed me that it turns to benzene in my body got me to buy Bubbie's, a good and real sauerkraut. Spending $7 on a jar of Bubbie's got me thinking, I could make 5 gallons of this with a much wider variety of species in it for $7. Now I eat it every night on top of my green salad for dinner. And since I've learned to incorporate vegetables like Indian gooseberry, bitter melon, okra, and eggplant, which are equally effective in limiting cholesterol as statins, but much cheaper and with only positive side effects. Pickling them in the lactic acid sauerkraut makes them taste good, so I'll eat more, and they only cost a vegetable price instead of a medicine price.

When someone realizes how much they are paying for corporate medicines and their side effects and I just eat it as food, they've got to realize that I'm getting a better and more delicious deal than they are.
John S
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Johnny Niamert
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You should try kale-kraut.

I'm planning on making a big vat soon. Good stuff.
 
Jennifer Wadsworth
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John - I've tried bitter melon in Indian food but it was just TOO bitter for me - how does it taste after fermentation?
 
John Saltveit
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Kale in kraut-great idea. I often have to fish out the kale ribs and broccoli stems from the compost that my wife puts in there to put them in the kraut. Before bland and fibrous, after, briny, juicy and savory. PLus-free probiotics.

Bitter melon, like amla-Indian gooseberry, and nopales-cactus pads, are pretty hard to eat raw, but medicinal. When bitter melon is made to be part of sauerkraut, it is juicy, salty, sour and savory, with just the slightest hint of bitter. You have to strain to sense the bitter. They taste great over green salad, which by itself, is not so flavorful.

I have noticed the correlation over time that many different Asian ethnic groups will eat things not because they taste great but because they're healthy. Then they will explore recipes on how to make that taste good. Is it surprising that the Japanese are much healthier and long-lived than Americans?
John S
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