• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

goji berry transplants wilting

 
Angelika Maier
Posts: 786
Location: cool climate, Blue Mountains, Australia
4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have sown some goji berries from berries and this is really dead easy. BUT after transplanting them into individual pots they wilted.
I chose an overcast day to do so and the next day was sort of overcast too, then it got hot, but then it got hot, but they wilted on the first day anyway.
They are still alivive.
What was it? Don't take goji berries to be transplanted or did I do this on the wrong moon phase (6th of feb)?
 
Michael Qulek
Posts: 148
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Transplanting can always be a shock to the plant, and I'm not surprised in the least. What you can do is place some kind of shade on the sunny side of the plant, so noon-time sun is not beating down on it. Keep it shaded and cool for the first week or two. If the plants are really wilted, you might try covering the plantlets with plastic bags, but you must be certain they get almost no direct sun. Any plant wrapped in plastic and in the sun is sure to be cooked!
 
Angelika Maier
Posts: 786
Location: cool climate, Blue Mountains, Australia
4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I covered them with cardboard during the day.
 
Judith Browning
Posts: 5615
Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
284
bike chicken fungi trees urban woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Angelika, I wondered how your goji plants are doing...did they come out of their wilt? I have a flat of seedlings that I started in doors a few weeks ago and am ready to transplant...good germination but between what you said and then something i read that said they don't transplant well because there isn't much root when they are young...now I am afraid to pot them up until I find out more. mine are indoors because it is still really cold here..I won't be putting any out until April.

I potted a few from an earlier flat and they look good but they were not as close together as the ones in this flat.
 
Michael Qulek
Posts: 148
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Angelika Maier wrote:I covered them with cardboard during the day.
When you say "covered", do you mean an inverted cardboard box that covers the plants down to the ground? If so, I think that's why they are wilting. The cardboard is acting like an oven and cooking them. I would cut the box in half, length-wise, and position it such that the box shades the plants from the noon sun, but the north side is still open to the wind. That way heat will not build up inside the box.
 
Judith Browning
Posts: 5615
Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
284
bike chicken fungi trees urban woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have about twenty four first year goji plants in pots...started from seed over the winter, that I can't seem to get used to the sun. they have been in a window and then on the porch with morning sun but much past that causes them to wilt badly and turn pale even done gradually as I do all of my starts. So far they recover by the next morning. I planted a few out today and made covers to shade them out of some loose hay and they still look wilted but not so pale. Reading more on line I guess this seems to be common...so I am wondering if anybody has gotten past the wiltly part and on to established plants.
Angelika, did yours recover? when I do a search on line this thread comes up early in the list The seed germinated so well, I would hate to lose them now.
 
John Saltveit
gardener
Posts: 2001
61
bike books food preservation forest garden fungi trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have some that slugs go crazy for. I have to watch them. You can put nylons around the base of plants that slugs want to crawl up. They hate crawling up nylon/burlap material. It wipes off their slime. I have saved many plants that way.
John S
PDX OR
 
The permaculture playing cards make great stocking stuffers: http://richsoil.com/cards
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!