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Feed storage: 275 gallon IBC tank/tote?

 
Ben Good
Posts: 27
Location: Central Ohio - Humid continental climate - USDA zone 6
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Anyone use one of those 275 gallon IBC tank/totes for feed or grains? I'm using 55 gal drums but those 275ers can be had for the same cost as a barrel! I imagine the tough part is converting to get the grain OUT.
 
R Scott
Posts: 3305
Location: Kansas Zone 6a
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Considered it, but no. Rodents can chew threw them pretty quick.
 
Kelly Smith
Posts: 699
Location: In a rain shadow - Fremont County, Southern CO
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i have stared at an IBC tote for a few hours trying to figure out how to convert it into feed/grain storage.
i cant come up with anything, other than a generic flip top, but that makes sealing it tough.

i am buying feed by the ton, so i would love a solution that didnt involve scooping feed from the delivery tote to cans.....
 
R Scott
Posts: 3305
Location: Kansas Zone 6a
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You could add a bucket door to the side pretty easy (a 4x6 guillotine door) using plywood and screws.

But you still need to put it on a rodent proof stand.

These are getting popular around here: http://www.greenswelding.com/html/bins.html

3 tons of feed in a towable trailer, don't even need a pickup. Beats handling bags for most people.

The hunting lease guys use them to fill their feeders in good weather. They build air-driven deals like this from scrap:



You need to add a cyclone if you are doing ground feed or it will blow dust EVERYWHERE.

Sure beats carrying bags up ladders on your shoulder--especially when you are already pushing a ladder weight rating by yourself!

Older bulk bins are available on craigslist for about $300/ton of capacity around here for ones small enough to haul on a trailer whole. Usually in good shape with a rusted out bottom--the part you would need to replace anyway because it was made for an auger and you want a bucket door. I think this is the route I will go, as getting feed delivered is cheaper than picking it up for me.
 
Ben Good
Posts: 27
Location: Central Ohio - Humid continental climate - USDA zone 6
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Never thought of a guillotine type door on the side.

Will rodents really chew through the plastic? I would imagine that since they are water tight the rodents wouldn't be able to smell it and have no reason to chew it. But just to make sure, what would a rodent-proof stand look like? Or what controls (besides resident barn cats) would be needed?
 
R Scott
Posts: 3305
Location: Kansas Zone 6a
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They will chew through metal barn siding to get to the grain, doesn't take much of a smell for them to be curious.

A rodent resistant (shouldn't call anything PROOF) stand has cones on the legs, like for bird feeders. We used old disc blades, but you can use anything metal. They don't have to be that big for mice, but for squirrels and rats they do.

BL_195.jpg
[Thumbnail for BL_195.jpg]
 
Ben Good
Posts: 27
Location: Central Ohio - Humid continental climate - USDA zone 6
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Scott, thanks for the image. That will stop climbing, but does anyone know how far/high a rat or mouse can jump. I'll just assume about 100 feet for squirrels
 
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