• Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Choctaw Hogs

 
Greg Boyderman
Posts: 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Choctaw_Hog

choctaw hog

Hi all, I'm new here and have been reading about these pigs and wanted to ask for some other people's opinions and/or experiences? They seem pretty interesting when you look at them from PD perspective? They're small, 120lbs on average and 'require little care'... Industrial Farming doesn't like them because they are small and don't have a very valuable market carcass. Internet also says they can 'become tame'... I dunno about the last part BUT I am going to write the Choctaw Nation and ask for more information about these pigs as I am intrigued. They listed as a 'critically rare' breed and are in need of conservation.. sad.
 
chad stamps
Posts: 46
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Very interesting. I've never encountered anyone who mentioned working with these before.

If that doesn't work out you might consider looking at Ossabaw Island Hogs, or American Guinea Hogs - both share some of the same traits that these appear to.
 
J D Horn
Posts: 155
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
You might find it difficult to locate breeding stock. The ALBC says that there are less than 150 animals left. http://www.albc-usa.org/cpl/choctaw.html
 
Greg Boyderman
Posts: 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
chad stamps wrote:Very interesting. I've never encountered anyone who mentioned working with these before.

If that doesn't work out you might consider looking at Ossabaw Island Hogs, or American Guinea Hogs - both share some of the same traits that these appear to.


I did some further reading today about American Guinea Hogs, they seem like a suitable alternative to the Choctaw, smaller and 'reasonably even tempered'. I'll have to do more reading on both.
 
Paul Ewing
Posts: 127
Location: Boyd, Texas
3
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
If you are just looking for smaller pigs, check out the potbelly pig. The bubble for them burst a long time ago and they are relatively inexpensive. There are several people using them for their original use as a household meat producer and they like them because the small size makes them easy to home process. I would be careful in the "heritage" breed market because they seem to be in the mid bubble curve of fad livestock. Lots of people trying to make money on the greater fool theory of selling breeding stock in the "rare and in demand" breed.

I am raising pigs for meat sales so I raise one of the oldest heritage breeds the Large White, AKA Yorkshire. I also like Hampshires (also older than most so called "heritage breeds") and crosses of the two. They do very well on pasture and in the woods and also produce a very nice carcass at 300-400 pounds.
 
Tokunbo Popoola
Posts: 202
Location: Sacramento, CA
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Paul Ewing wrote:If you are just looking for smaller pigs, check out the potbelly pig. The bubble for them burst a long time ago and they are relatively inexpensive. There are several people using them for their original use as a household meat producer and they like them because the small size makes them easy to home process. I would be careful in the "heritage" breed market because they seem to be in the mid bubble curve of fad livestock. Lots of people trying to make money on the greater fool theory of selling breeding stock in the "rare and in demand" breed.

I am raising pigs for meat sales so I raise one of the oldest heritage breeds the Large White, AKA Yorkshire. I also like Hampshires (also older than most so called "heritage breeds") and crosses of the two. They do very well on pasture and in the woods and also produce a very nice carcass at 300-400 pounds.


i agree about the fad bit about them for some people .... but it's worth getting some for example navajo sheep.. work really well in california.. because of the way they are setup. sometimes some of the heritage breeds are bred for your area where other breeds you have to work with it for much longer. (or find someone local who has been breeding that sheep, pig, goat, so forth in your area for a LONG time).. certain breeds have to be developed for a way of outdoor life or you will end up having to put in major work. some shorter less common breeds work well in apple orc. or.. other non common places and taste great. i think we have a habit of labeling fad.. which it is for some people.. and not a fad if you need an animal who can live and survive in your area out doors and already has the breeding tools inborn already then you having to develope them. for example in the south.. cattle with slicker coats.. do better.. or california sheeps with expose bellies and can still shed their wool per season do really well here.
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://stoves2.com
  • Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic