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Yellow Fat.

 
Tokunbo Popoola
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I got myself a farming mentor by walking down the street to a real farm and started asking question. this is basically a hobby farm purely because it's a lot of land and i didnt want to buy a lawn mower. ok i was talking to the farmer.. and he was helping me with the fridge retirement plan for some layer hens. he told me when you buy food or grow food on almost any animal you want to see yellow fat. my chickens had yellow fat which i never notice before until he pointed it out. is that really a good trait to look for or is it a gene thing? 10 of 9 of mine had yellow fat. only one had light yellow fat
 
Renate Howard
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It's beta carotene, precursor to vitamin A, and means there's other good stuff like Omega 3's and vitamin K. Yeah it's good.

The one with lighter fat may have been laying - beta carotene went into the eggs. Just a guess.
 
Tokunbo Popoola
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Renate Haeckler wrote:It's beta carotene, precursor to vitamin A, and means there's other good stuff like Omega 3's and vitamin K. Yeah it's good.

The one with lighter fat may have been laying - beta carotene went into the eggs. Just a guess.



does the yellow fat rule work for all meat? from everything like cows, sheeps, goats?> it's supposed to be yellow?
 
Craig Dobbelyu
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I cooked up three hens yesterday to make a big soup base. The fat was almost as orange as some of the yolks that I found in the hens. I think the color has more to do with diet than genetics but I could be wrong. I've only butchered a hundred or so birds and the fat has always been some shade of yellow.
 
Renate Howard
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For most animals, they should have yellow fat. Some kinds of cows like Ayrshires and Holsteins don't store beta carotene they store vitamin A so theirs may be white but still good. I can't remember with the pigs but I think their fat was white, even tho they had lots of green grass. It was liquid at room temperature, tho - very unsaturated, which makes it hard to cook with, actually.
 
Tokunbo Popoola
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Renate Haeckler wrote:For most animals, they should have yellow fat. Some kinds of cows like Ayrshires and Holsteins don't store beta carotene they store vitamin A so theirs may be white but still good. I can't remember with the pigs but I think their fat was white, even tho they had lots of green grass. It was liquid at room temperature, tho - very unsaturated, which makes it hard to cook with, actually.



sorry for asking more question but let me get this straight so im not totally confusing this...

-yellow fat is good but not always the absolute arbitrator of good nutrition or genetics

this is the part im confused about? if it's good fat it should be liquid at room temp or not? what should it look and act like uncooked if it's a good well kept animal that ate right?
 
Burra Maluca
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As I understand it, it's not that simple.

If an animal is fed lots of 'greens', then the fat might store some of the catotene, which will then be yellow. But not all animals have the genetics to do that. I'm not sure of the exact mechanism, but I do know for instance that butter from pasture-fed cows is yellow, but from pasture-fed goats is generally white as they convert the beta-carotene into full-blown vitamin A.

Same with fat consistency. It's influenced by many things, including diet and where on the animal it's stored. 'Neatsfoot', for instance, comes from cows' lower legs, and is liquid. Their feet would probably freeze solid in cold weather if it wasn't. I think that fat from grain-fed animals tends to be firmer, but, like I said, it's complicated.

For me, egg-yolks and fat colour in my poultry follow the seasons - they are yelllow when we have fresh, green grass for them to eat and paler during high summer when it's too hot for the grass to grow.
 
Cj Sloane
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Renate Haeckler wrote:Some kinds of cows like Ayrshires and Holsteins don't store beta carotene they store vitamin A so theirs may be white but still good. I can't remember with the pigs but I think their fat was white, even tho they had lots of green grass. It was liquid at room temperature, tho - very unsaturated, which makes it hard to cook with, actually.


I have Belted Galloways and they are not fed any grain but their fat is still white. I have seen yellowish fat on other beef so it may be breed dependent. My pig's fat seems white too, but I'd have to compare with store bought. It might be yellowish in comparison. Weather a pigs fat is liquid at room temp has to do with it's diet.

I think the fat of my sheep is mostly whiteish but again, I'd have to compare with store bought to be sure.
 
Renate Howard
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Jerseys are known for their yellow butter and yellow fat. In fact, some butchers cut off all the fat and throw it away if it's yellow because they assume people are expecting white fat and will be put off if it's the "wrong" color.

High grain diet = more saturated fat = solid at warmer temperatures, but more omega-6 and less omega-3, in general.

A good pig fat from pasture with sunlight and lots of grass is a great source of Vitamin D and omega 3. Not so for grain-fed and raised in a shelter/building. Same for chickens.

The yolks from our chickens eggs stayed really highly colored all winter - I read recently they will eat bunny poop and sure enough - there is NONE under the rabbit cages! I guess the chickens are extracting the "vegetable-ness" from that even when there was snow on the ground! They did get a bit more orange when the snow melted and they could eat grass again, tho.
 
Tokunbo Popoola
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Renate Haeckler wrote:Jerseys are known for their yellow butter and yellow fat. In fact, some butchers cut off all the fat and throw it away if it's yellow because they assume people are expecting white fat and will be put off if it's the "wrong" color.

High grain diet = more saturated fat = solid at warmer temperatures, but more omega-6 and less omega-3, in general.

A good pig fat from pasture with sunlight and lots of grass is a great source of Vitamin D and omega 3. Not so for grain-fed and raised in a shelter/building. Same for chickens.

The yolks from our chickens eggs stayed really highly colored all winter - I read recently they will eat bunny poop and sure enough - there is NONE under the rabbit cages! I guess the chickens are extracting the "vegetable-ness" from that even when there was snow on the ground! They did get a bit more orange when the snow melted and they could eat grass again, tho.


lots of really good info. i will take it to heart while shopping and while retiring my own thanks!!!
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://richsoil.com/cards
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