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Goose Recipies

 
pollinator
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This is great! Lane, thank you for taking the time to answer questions and suggest recipes. I was going to cook a goose. I imagine I will be able to get 3 or 4 dishes out of it and am wondering if you had any suggestions. I was thinking of starting with the breasts as I was recently exposed to a pair of exquisite ones here on this site I also imagine the carcass will end up as soup in the end. I've roasted duck a few times and made duck biscuits and gravy before but I was really just experimenting with things that are hard to screw up (like soup) Any suggestions very welcome. I live in the pacific northwest so I generally have access to lots of cool season veggies and on the shoulders of winter lots of mushrooms. Oyster mushrooms and nettles look like a sure bet for the near future. But I'm game for anything! That prosciutto looks to die for and I think my fig tree might just give me a fig or two by the time it'd be cured.
 
pollinator
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I would be interested in this answer too.
I usually roast my goose stuffed with apple and black pudding making sure it's on a trivet to catch the fat.

David
 
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We are adding geese to the homestead and I am hoping to make goose prosciutto someday, riffing off of this recipe
 
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Landon Sunrich wrote:I was thinking of starting with the breasts as I was recently exposed to a pair of exquisite ones here on this site



Tee hee.

My wife's done a few Christmas geese, and tried some easy recipes and some hard ones (like Julia Child's foie-gras-stuffed-prune recipe- elaborate!), and the hand's down winner was to do the goose in the crock pot. Whether roasting first and THEN going in the crock pot, or just going straight there, after a day at low heat, the goose was so good- every single time- that I wanted to swish it around my mouth like wine. Never had any other meat that good.

We did a couple wild geese this way, and a couple farm-raised, and the results were consistently amazing. I recommend it to everybody.
 
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I've never cooked a goose--so I'm no help here.

I've had two wild goose Thanksgiving dinners, thanks to a Montana friend. One was memorably good--rich, tender, wonderful meat. The next one, for which we made an amazing wild huckleberry sauce, was like eating rubber bands, albeit with really good sauce. I don't know if the hunters might have been able to tell the difference when they dressed the birds, and I wasn't the cook so I don't have any light to shed.

That experience made me think that if I were to be presented with a wild goose to cook, I would go the crockpot route just in case its another tough one.
 
Landon Sunrich
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Lane Morgan wrote: an amazing wild huckleberry sauce



Well that sound absolutely intriguing. Can you elaborate or is it a trade secret ?
 
Lane Morgan
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the sauce...not a secret, but I can't remember details. Probably it was huckleberries, sugar, and some sort of not very fruity liqueur (kirschwasser?), simmered together. Huckleberries have such an intense taste that not much else could compete anyway.
 
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