• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies living kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • raven ranson
  • paul wheaton
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Julia Winter
stewards:
  • Burra Maluca
  • Devaka Cooray
  • Bill Erickson
garden masters:
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Bryant RedHawk
  • Mike Jay
gardeners:
  • Joseph Lofthouse
  • Dan Boone
  • Daron Williams

False Indigo (Amorpha fruticosa)  RSS feed

 
Posts: 142
Location: Missoula, Montana (zone 4)
8
 
master steward
Posts: 4921
Location: Missoula, MT
677
books food preservation forest garden hugelkultur purity
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I merged your stuff with the following thread. I hope that is okay by you.
 
Posts: 54
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hey all,

I've heard some great things about the nitrogen fixation and nectary properties of false indigo...I bought seeds but it looks like there are two completely different species. I hear guys like Eric Toensmeier talk more about Amorpha Nana but Baptisia seems more common. Anyone have experience with both of these plants?
 
Posts: 100
Location: Denver, Co 6000ft bentonite clay soil
4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I've only grown Baptista so I can't really say anything specific about the Amorphas. From what I can see though the biggest difference is that Baptista is an herbaceous perennial and the Amorpha is a small shrub. I do love my Baptista. I have the traditional blue/purple flowering one and also a yellow flowering one. They are lovely and showy when they bloom and have cool seed pods when they are done blooming. One thing to consider I suppose is that Baptista is a fairly late to emerge plant. This could be a concern if the area is going to get any foot traffic in spring and you don't want to have to worry about where you are stepping. I don't do fall garden cleanup but Baptista seems to be one of those plants that most traces disappear over the winter.
 
Jocelyn Campbell
master steward
Posts: 4921
Location: Missoula, MT
677
books food preservation forest garden hugelkultur purity
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
If it helps, here is blue indigo seed from Peaceful Valley Seeds: http://www.groworganic.com/hh-blue-indigo.html.
 
when your children are suffering from your punishment, tell your them it will help them write good poetry when they are older. Like this tiny ad:
five days of natural building (wofati and cob) and rocket cooktop oct 8-12, 2018
https://permies.com/t/92034/permaculture-projects/days-natural-building-wofati-cob
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!