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bees on diversified farm. farm naturally (no input)

 
Tokunbo Popoola
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Location: Sacramento, CA
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does anyone have any numbers on colony collops on diversified farm, permaculture farms, self sufficient farms? are they dying on those farms? ive never seen any numbers or much.. university research done on them just wondering
 
Ernie Schmidt
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Location: Olympia, Washington
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Ever since the out break CCD(colony collapse disorder), as a layman I have researched and studied CCD and it's relation to sideliners or hobby beekeepers. I have yet to find a single documented case of CCD in a Warre or Top Bar keeper. At this point I can only conclude the disorder to be an aliment directly related to commercial beekeeping. When I say a "documented case" I refer to an episode that is clearly back up by professional, personal observation. I have received cases of "my uncle's neighbor heard about the bee keeper down the street from his house that had CCD in a Top Bar hive" type of reports. No matter how sincere, I can only consider this type of observation to be hearsay and not documented. I am still open to any and all documentation refuting my conclusions. Knowledge is the most important key to dealing with honey bee health.
 
Michael Cox
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A documentary about bees was published last year here in the uk. One interesting observation was that urban bee keepers were doing really well in a period where rural bee keepers were really struggling. They didn't know exactly why but pinned it in large part on massive scale monoculture cropping. The landscape and hence forage is less diverse leaving bees more vulnerable to all other factors (disease, pesticides etc...).
 
Quintin Holmberg
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honey bees travel up to a mile to forage. If there were any hives with exclusively permaculture farms in that range, the number would be so few that any statistics would be considered inconclusive.

However, current research points to the pesticides used by the farms you are implicating with you question. Specifically, neonicitinoids.
 
Chris Badgett
pollinator
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Try reaching out to Ross Conrad. We just created an online Apitherapy course with him over at Organic Life Guru. He's very knowledgeable about colony collapse. Here's his website: Dancing Bee Gardens
 
tel jetson
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Quintin Holmberg wrote:Honey bees travel up to a mile to forage.


a colony that traveled only a mile to forage would be rather unusual. more common is four miles, and six isn't unusual where forage is sparse.
 
Tokunbo Popoola
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Chris Badgett wrote:Try reaching out to Ross Conrad. We just created an online Apitherapy course with him over at Organic Life Guru. He's very knowledgeable about colony collapse. Here's his website: Dancing Bee Gardens


thanks a lot will look into it
 
Cj Sloane
pollinator
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According to Paul's 6 of diamonds,
Conventional beekeepers lose 40% of their bees annually to ccd. Organic beekeepers lose 5-10%. Permaculture beekeepers rarely lose hives when they follow these techniques.

The techniques are on the card.

 
tel jetson
steward
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permaculture beeks regularly lose hives. as their colonies establish and adapt, though, losses should decrease over time.
 
Cj Sloane
pollinator
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Tel, is it too early to know how your hives fared through the winter? Did any type do better than any other?
 
Patrick Mann
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Location: Seattle, WA, USA
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Cj Verde wrote:According to Paul's 6 of diamonds,
Conventional beekeepers lose 40% of their bees annually to ccd. Organic beekeepers lose 5-10%. Permaculture beekeepers rarely lose hives when they follow these techniques.


That doesn't match my experience. I attended the 2013 West Coast Treatment-free Beekeeping Conference and *everybody* was reporting losses far exceeding 5-10%. Unless we are talking *only* CCD - in that case I agree, that is rare in natural beekeeping.

 
Ludger Merkens
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Hi,
if you are talking about CCD, what symptoms are you exactly talking about? I know hive losses from varroa mites infection, from nosema also, but I probably couldn't tell CCD from a varoa mites infection apart.

Independently of the exact symptoms of CCD. It seems obvious to me, that healthy, diverse, non poisenous forage, with full honey storage above the bees all year, is a good starting point to reduce colony losses.

 
Ernie Schmidt
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This site mentions the symptoms of CCD, along with other honey bee diseases and pests.
http://kanat.jsc.vsc.edu/student/lees/maincontent.htm
 
Ludger Merkens
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Thanks Ernie,
interesting read, but the cited literature is more than 5 years old. Probably too old for such an acute problem. Is there more recent development on this?
 
Tokunbo Popoola
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Location: Sacramento, CA
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Ludger Merkens wrote:Hi,
if you are talking about CCD, what symptoms are you exactly talking about? I know hive losses from varroa mites infection, from nosema also, but I probably couldn't tell CCD from a varoa mites infection apart.

Independently of the exact symptoms of CCD. It seems obvious to me, that healthy, diverse, non poisenous forage, with full honey storage above the bees all year, is a good starting point to reduce colony losses.



well i want to know basic informational compare between hives that don't move around and stay in the same place.. conventional farming hives that stay in place, hives in urban areas, hives on permaculture farms, hives on organic farms that use more industrial organic practices.. traditional conventional diversified farming operations. it seems like all this the bee's are dying talk is always done by people who are part of big farming... i havent seen university studies.. of other types of farming and there impact on the bee's. it's frustrating because bee research seems to mostly bee in reference to conventional farming even pollinator research is gear that way.
 
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