• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Shreded/chipped bamboo as filler instead of hemp in hempcrete  RSS feed

 
David E Sharpe
Posts: 1
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Given that bamboo has a high silca content like hemp, could it not be used as a 'filler' in hempcrete or as I'd call it bamcrete The reason I ask is that in my country (New Zealand) the rules for growing your own hemp are extremely long winded and difficult. Also the way I see it bamboo wouldn't require the stripping of the outer fibre like hemp does. I'm not inteested in making hemp fibre, just a house.

There are people making and selling hemp shiv in NZ, but at a distance that makes the advantages of it rather less.

Any comments / impressions / observations welcome.
 
Rusty Shackleford
Posts: 22
Location: Tidewater Virginia
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I was able to find info on bamboo as a rebar substitute (it works, apparently) but nothing immediately about it as an aggregate. Check out this text: Material For Sustainable Sites - Meg Calkins Page 425-7 in particular. It's written a textbook, but doesn't offer citation for some of the topics covered (the historian in me reels at this)
 
Bo Taylor
Posts: 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Who's going to test this out? I think you could really be on to something. . .
 
Terry Ruth
Posts: 698
26
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hemp averages ~ 80% silica content since it can grow in sand it is said, so if the bamboo is that high in theory, yes, however, I have never seen any data to support this as in lab of tested core samples. I know Magnesium OXY Chorides bind well to cellulose since I been talking to a MAG chemist and seen his lab test but nothing specific to hemp. Be careful here there are hemp suppliers and myths that would like everyone to believe it is some magic potion. It binds well to lime and portland cement to, perhaps a mag bentonite clay again in theory, but many of the binders can leach and be corrosive if not designed right.

We been talking about tensile strength aggregates here: http://www.permies.com/t/56689/cob/Cob-Fiber-Composite
 
Those are the largest trousers in the world! Especially when next to this ad:
Mike Oehler's Low-Cost Underground House Workshop & Survival Shelter Seminar - 3 DVD+2 Books Deal
https://permies.com/wiki/48625/digital-market/digital-market/Mike-Oehler-Cost-Underground-House
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!