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Podcast 287 - Reverence for Bees Part 4

 
Adrien Lapointe
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Summary

Credits: Rob Young


Part 4 of the Reverence for bees podcast with Paul and Jacqueline begins with the colony collapse disorder topic and how they both feel it is due to stress. Pesticides/Herbicides are a form of stress as well. They also discuss how research is done and how it lacks in actual, factual data due to not observing the bees over time not just a quick one time observation. Paul also suggests his idea of why the chem ag companies are researching this disorder as well and makes some future predictions on new laws and new products and the ways they will be advertised and administrated. Jacqueline chimes in that most people are not reading the instructions on how to spray the chem-ag products as well.

Paul reveals that Kraft and Nabisco are 2 of his least favorite food companies and tells why.

Mites are then discussed and the ways they can be killed- Miticides. They talk of the organic ways of dealing with this and the treatment free method. It seems their conclusion is: Don't poison bad things (mold, mites)-build up the health of the overall colony so they can take on the natural!

Migratory beekeeping is then tackled as to what it is, how they do it and how and why they continue to stay in the business. Some hives can travel up to 10,000 per year driven around on the back of semi tractor trailers. Monocrops are the cause of this business model.

The thought of importing bees from other countries is given a quick overview- pro's and cons.

Powdered sugar is discussed how, why, and why not to use this as a treatment. Jacqueline reviews sugar water and pollen patties- pros and cons.

99% of honey off the shelves had spores of bee diseases in them according to an FDA colony collapse study. Jacqueline suggest people to save 2 years supply of their own honey for emergencies in order to avoid giving your bees store bought honey and introducing these diseases into your own bees. She gives other suggestions as well.

The need for water station and how to build one is one of Jacqueline's favorite past times. She presents why this is so important for the colonies health and how it becomes as Paul put it "a neutral zone".

They wrap it up with 3 seasons forage, variety of forage, and, polyculture. Planting is important. Bees will pollinate only one type of flower per day, like all lavender/ all day so plant clumps of lavender together so they do not have to search all over for it. Jacqueline closes out with a list of different flowers to plant and for what times of year they are useful (3 seasons, variety and polyculture).

Bigger, better, faster in terms of business and bees is hashed out as well.

Useful Links

Part 3 of the interview
honey bees Forum
bees: way beyond organic, bee reverence thread at permies

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Matt Powers
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I LOVE THIS SERIES!!!
 
tel jetson
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Adrien Lapointe wrote:Monocrops are the cause of this business model.


I'm not sure that's actually the case. or rather, that's not the whole story. without migratory beekeepers, vast monocultures would never have been planted. so beekeepers are a precondition of monocrops rather than a result of them.
 
Matt Powers
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I don't know if that's true either: Monocropping is as old as people are. Wherever we've gone we've tried to replicate "glut". Our hunter/gatherer instincts are to look for glut, or a concentration of fruit or animals or color even that indicates less work & more calories/sugar/etc. Most of our history is us trying to live as large as possible and then tapping out the possibilities of the resources of that region (soil mostly). I would venture to say that they didn't have pesticides & herbicides, so bees were naturally present. Instead of monocrops failing with the soil failure, we've pushed past it with chemicals. The bees are simply caught in the garish reality.
 
tel jetson
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there are bees, and then there are beekeepers. an almond plantation of the scale that is now the norm wouldn't even produce almonds without migratory beekeepers. so I maintain that beekeepers are a necessary precondition for the development of many of the vast monocultures that are now common.
 
Mariamne Ingalls
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Wow!

Love the tip of the site http://www.themelissagarden.com !!!

As Jacqueline states near the end, you can go there, click on the "Plants for Pollinators" link and find all kinds of plants.
Nice resource when planning.

It even includes shrubs!

Awesome!!!

Thanks Paul and Jacqueline for the podcasts!!!
Mariamne
 
Cj Sloane
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I do wish they had spoke even more about the requirement for movable combs. Warre hives are actually illegal in most states unless you modify the bars to make them like this:


The deal is that more & more state are requiring movable combs so that the inspector can look for disease but opening up the hives changes the temps & humidity, stressing them out, making them more prone to get sick...
 
tel jetson
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Washington State, where Jacqueline lives, doesn't have much budget for disease inspectors. the upshot of this is that folks with only a few gives don't get inspected, particularly if they aren't registered with the department of agriculture. fixed frame hives are still technically illegal, but that doesn't mean a whole lot in practice.
 
Cj Sloane
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My bee inspector is giving me a bit of a hard time though. I asked for a waiver which would let me legally have a fixed comb hive. He said I should register the [illegal] hive first, then he'd decide if he would grant me the waiver. Seems like a catch-22 to me.

There's is a $500 penalty for having a fixed comb hive.

The people in my local bee group said the bee inspector does make the rounds.
 
edwin lake
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Paul and Jacqueline,

Thank you both for this podcast series. I listened to it on my commute to and from work. I think I was literally laughing out loud on at least three or four occasions. Not so much because of the humor--which this podcast includes in bountiful quantity--but because of the amazing insights into the hive mind offered by Jacqueline Freeman. I hope to buy her book as soon as it becomes available. Thank you both for putting this series together. It was super-awesome.

Edwin
Western North Carolina
 
tel jetson
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Cj Verde wrote:My bee inspector is giving me a bit of a hard time though. I asked for a waiver which would let me legally have a fixed comb hive. He said I should register the [illegal] hive first, then he'd decide if he would grant me the waiver. Seems like a catch-22 to me.

There's is a $500 penalty for having a fixed comb hive.

The people in my local bee group said the bee inspector does make the rounds.


does he seem like a reasonable chap? find out what diseases he's inspecting for and educate yourself as to how they can be checked without removing comb. most, if not all, can. if he absolutely requires that comb be removed, insist that you be the one to handle the comb while he does the inspection and that it be done during warm weather and nectar flow so as not to instigate robbing.
 
Marianne West
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Absolutely love this interview. I listened to all, one after another, and felt I wanted more…...
 
Tony Flint
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Location: Maple Valley, WA, USA - Zone 8a, 500 ft elevation
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This series was amazing. I am now building/buying/scrounging up hives to start my first apiary. Thank you dearly to Paul and Jacqueline and Adrien and everyone else involved in producing it.

Also, after hearing Paul's interpretation of mason bees at 1:06:45, I now wish to be reincarnated as one.
 
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